VOGONS


AMD 5x86@160mhz., Media Vision PAS16.

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Reply 82 of 98, by pentiumspeed

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WARNING!

WD40 is and never will is NOT a lubricant ever. It was intended use was protecting the metal from corrosion, which I researched long ago. I tried some on something long ago and it thickened up to waxy mess and does not have lubricant qualities even for heavy loads, and really messy. You'll not see me have one in my tool box. For the car doors, I use another spray can that is thinned with evaporating solvent when sprayed, it came out in a foam that goes into door hinges on cars and latch mechanisms and foam for few second then eventually thickens into real heavy oil film. Worked really good on sliding door roller bearings, was stiff from age. Then sliding easily with two finger even in winter. Fluid Film Multi Lubricant is the name of this spray can. But too thick for fan anyway but correct one. Not WD40.

Also no to silicone grease as well,

Use engine oil or unscented baby oil (purest mineral oil) which is cheapest and plentiful. Do not buy slick products.

Fans spins fast and needs to be sliding on oil layer instead of contact to contact point (btw, this is is exactly what fluid bearing works in hard drives and engines, transmissions etc) and not stiff that fan ends up spinning slowly and eventually burn out. That what viscosity is all about.

Cheers,

Great Northern aka Canada.

Reply 83 of 98, by feipoa

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I only use Liquid Wrench and WD40 to soak torqued rusty bolts overnight, in preparation for removal.

I've heard of this fluid film stuff from a mechanic friend of mine. I've always wanted to find some and now I know the name. This the stuff? https://www.homehardware.ca/en/333g-fluid-fil … icant/p/8640376

Unscented baby oil - I'll have to try that. I probably still have some.

Ultimate 486 Benchmark | Ultimate 686 Benchmark | Cyrix 5x86 Enhancements | 486 Overkill Graphics | Worlds Fastest 486

Reply 85 of 98, by LHN91

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feipoa wrote on 2020-02-21, 00:58:

I only use Liquid Wrench and WD40 to soak torqued rusty bolts overnight, in preparation for removal.

I've heard of this fluid film stuff from a mechanic friend of mine. I've always wanted to find some and now I know the name. This the stuff? https://www.homehardware.ca/en/333g-fluid-fil … icant/p/8640376

Unscented baby oil - I'll have to try that. I probably still have some.

Biggest thing with Fluid Film is it's rather thick. Holds up well for larger (read desk-sized) fan motors and the like, works great for undercoating/rust-proofing, but not great for delicate/smaller items.

Reply 86 of 98, by feipoa

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LHN91 wrote on 2020-02-21, 02:17:
feipoa wrote on 2020-02-21, 00:58:

I only use Liquid Wrench and WD40 to soak torqued rusty bolts overnight, in preparation for removal.

I've heard of this fluid film stuff from a mechanic friend of mine. I've always wanted to find some and now I know the name. This the stuff? https://www.homehardware.ca/en/333g-fluid-fil … icant/p/8640376

Unscented baby oil - I'll have to try that. I probably still have some.

Biggest thing with Fluid Film is it's rather thick. Holds up well for larger (read desk-sized) fan motors and the like, works great for undercoating/rust-proofing, but not great for delicate/smaller items.

I want it working on the car - particularly for hard to reach spots which need grease but don't have a grease nipple and for the door hinges. Seems like every winter, after the roads have been salted, my suspension starts making a lot of noise and it needs a good greasing to quiet it up again. I have around 30 nipples to grease, but some spots are without and need something that can spray on liquid to fit thru the cracks, then turn into something with consistency like wheel bearing grease.

Ultimate 486 Benchmark | Ultimate 686 Benchmark | Cyrix 5x86 Enhancements | 486 Overkill Graphics | Worlds Fastest 486

Reply 87 of 98, by Jo22

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pentiumspeed wrote on 2020-02-21, 00:42:

Use engine oil or unscented baby oil (purest mineral oil) which is cheapest and plentiful. Do not buy slick products.

Or weapon oil, maybe. Sounds macabre, I know. But that oil is very fine also and doesn't seem to suffer from resinification.. 😐

"Time, it seems, doesn't flow. For some it's fast, for some it's slow.
In what to one race is no time at all, another race can rise and fall..." - The Minstrel

//My video channel//

Reply 88 of 98, by gdjacobs

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pentiumspeed wrote on 2020-02-21, 00:42:
WARNING! […]
Show full quote

WARNING!

WD40 is and never will is NOT a lubricant ever. It was intended use was protecting the metal from corrosion, which I researched long ago. I tried some on something long ago and it thickened up to waxy mess and does not have lubricant qualities even for heavy loads, and really messy. You'll not see me have one in my tool box. For the car doors, I use another spray can that is thinned with evaporating solvent when sprayed, it came out in a foam that goes into door hinges on cars and latch mechanisms and foam for few second then eventually thickens into real heavy oil film. Worked really good on sliding door roller bearings, was stiff from age. Then sliding easily with two finger even in winter. Fluid Film Multi Lubricant is the name of this spray can. But too thick for fan anyway but correct one. Not WD40.

Also no to silicone grease as well,

Use engine oil or unscented baby oil (purest mineral oil) which is cheapest and plentiful. Do not buy slick products.

Fans spins fast and needs to be sliding on oil layer instead of contact to contact point (btw, this is is exactly what fluid bearing works in hard drives and engines, transmissions etc) and not stiff that fan ends up spinning slowly and eventually burn out. That what viscosity is all about.

Cheers,

I've used both sewing machine oil and petroleum jelly to lube fan bearings. Sewing machine oil has much more penetration while petroleum jelly has great persistence.

All hail the Great Capacitor Brand Finder

Reply 89 of 98, by Intel486dx33

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I would use oil as a temporary solution to revive a CPU fan. If it has gone bad it’s time to replace.
Maybe a noisily fan is good because it is notifying you to replace it.
Where a silent bad working fan does not notify you to replace it.

Especially on a CPU that requires a fan or is over clocked.

I already but NEW fans in my computers.

Reply 91 of 98, by barleyguy

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Interesting machine. I had almost this exact computer from 1995 to 1997 (I posted my 1997 machine in a different thread). Mine was a 5x86 133 with 16 MB RAM, an ATI Graphics Xpression video card, a 540 MB hard drive, and an 8x CD-ROM Drive. And a Pro Audio Spectrum 16. I think I essentially built this machine for the release of Windows 95.

This was the first machine I ever played multiplayer, multimachine games on. We used to have LAN Parties and play Duke Nukem 3D. We would set up 4 machines on a dining room table, hook the 4 machines together (with serial cables strangely enough), and play Duke. Good memories.

Reply 92 of 98, by derSammler

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barleyguy wrote on 2020-03-01, 16:04:

I think I essentially built this machine for the release of Windows 95.

Are you sure? Because the AMD 5x86 was released three months after Windows 95 and was probably not widely available before 1996. So unless you had a time-machine, that doesn't quite fit. 😉

Reply 93 of 98, by barleyguy

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derSammler wrote on 2020-03-01, 16:22:
barleyguy wrote on 2020-03-01, 16:04:

I think I essentially built this machine for the release of Windows 95.

Are you sure? Because the AMD 5x86 was released three months after Windows 95 and was probably not widely available before 1996. So unless you had a time-machine, that doesn't quite fit. 😉

I probably got the 5x86 133 around its release day. One of my best friends owned a computer store (that I worked at several times), so I generally saw hardware, especially AMD hardware, around the time it came out. It was definitely 1995, because I remember which house I was living in at the time, and I moved in 1996.

I could have got Windows 95 and the 5x86 3 months after Windows 95 came out though. That does line up.

Reply 94 of 98, by NyLan

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Last time I tried to open websites with such old browser, almost all sites couldn't work due to https requirement. 🙁

My Intel SE440BX-2 Intel's website Mirror : Modified to include docs, refs and BIOSes.

Reply 95 of 98, by feipoa

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LHN91 wrote on 2020-02-21, 02:17:
feipoa wrote on 2020-02-21, 00:58:

I only use Liquid Wrench and WD40 to soak torqued rusty bolts overnight, in preparation for removal.

I've heard of this fluid film stuff from a mechanic friend of mine. I've always wanted to find some and now I know the name. This the stuff? https://www.homehardware.ca/en/333g-fluid-fil … icant/p/8640376

Unscented baby oil - I'll have to try that. I probably still have some.

Biggest thing with Fluid Film is it's rather thick. Holds up well for larger (read desk-sized) fan motors and the like, works great for undercoating/rust-proofing, but not great for delicate/smaller items.

I bought some of this stuff and thought I should provide an update. It smells absolutely horrible. I used it on the door hinges of my car and it reeked up the whole interior for a week. I can't really describe the smell to relate it to anything else, but perhaps sweet and musky body odor combined.

Ultimate 486 Benchmark | Ultimate 686 Benchmark | Cyrix 5x86 Enhancements | 486 Overkill Graphics | Worlds Fastest 486

Reply 96 of 98, by LHN91

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feipoa wrote on 2020-08-01, 21:20:
LHN91 wrote on 2020-02-21, 02:17:
feipoa wrote on 2020-02-21, 00:58:

I only use Liquid Wrench and WD40 to soak torqued rusty bolts overnight, in preparation for removal.

I've heard of this fluid film stuff from a mechanic friend of mine. I've always wanted to find some and now I know the name. This the stuff? https://www.homehardware.ca/en/333g-fluid-fil … icant/p/8640376

Unscented baby oil - I'll have to try that. I probably still have some.

Biggest thing with Fluid Film is it's rather thick. Holds up well for larger (read desk-sized) fan motors and the like, works great for undercoating/rust-proofing, but not great for delicate/smaller items.

I bought some of this stuff and thought I should provide an update. It smells absolutely horrible. I used it on the door hinges of my car and it reeked up the whole interior for a week. I can't really describe the smell to relate it to anything else, but perhaps sweet and musky body odor combined.

I don't mind the smell..... but we used it a lot on equipment when my family had farm equipment.

Reply 98 of 98, by Intel486dx33

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My Advent speaker setup.

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