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NT3.51 Just turned 25 Today!

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Reply 20 of 56, by Caluser2000

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Intel486dx33 wrote on 2020-06-22, 11:39:

Back in 1990’s HP was able to create a Global computer network using WinNT 3.5.1

You have heard of marketing hype I would imagine?

There's a glitch in the matrix.

Reply 21 of 56, by Intel486dx33

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Caluser2000 wrote on 2020-06-22, 17:31:
Intel486dx33 wrote on 2020-06-22, 11:39:

Back in 1990’s HP was able to create a Global computer network using WinNT 3.5.1

You have heard of marketing hype I would imagine?

Well, it wasn’t entirely global but it encompassed many nations and continents.

Reply 22 of 56, by Caluser2000

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Intel486dx33 wrote on 2020-06-22, 18:13:
Caluser2000 wrote on 2020-06-22, 17:31:
Intel486dx33 wrote on 2020-06-22, 11:39:

Back in 1990’s HP was able to create a Global computer network using WinNT 3.5.1

You have heard of marketing hype I would imagine?

Well, it wasn’t entirely global but it encompassed many nations and continents.

Do you perhaps think it may have been done in the back of what we call the internet these days? You know like the www is?

There's a glitch in the matrix.

Reply 23 of 56, by chinny22

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Washington/ The Whitehouse had a number of servers.

Came across this when researching for something else. It's very dry but name drops period correct hardware and software.
https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=aC4NuOffN … epage&q&f=false

It's interesting (to me at least) for a few pages per day

Reply 24 of 56, by appiah4

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We had NT 3.51 on our high school network server, I had a lot of fun poking around with that PC and not understanding anything. 😁 I never installed it at home, I should sometime, maybe if I ever get a dual Socket7/8/Slot-1 motherboard or something.

Retronautics: A digital gallery of my retro computers, hardware and projects.

Reply 25 of 56, by Intel486dx33

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Caluser2000 wrote on 2020-06-23, 08:35:
Intel486dx33 wrote on 2020-06-22, 18:13:
Caluser2000 wrote on 2020-06-22, 17:31:

You have heard of marketing hype I would imagine?

Well, it wasn’t entirely global but it encompassed many nations and continents.

Do you perhaps think it may have been done in the back of what we call the internet these days? You know like the www is?

No, It definitely was a multi national computer network.
Even our Cable modem service provider when they first started out back in 1996 was first just an open computer network with not much security.
You could browse the entire network and share printers and make shares on your computer through windows network neighborhood.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/@Home_Network

Reply 26 of 56, by chrismeyer6

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I remember a similar experience when Adelphia first started offering cable modem service. You could see everyone's computers on the entire node. Which then prompted my parents to switch to Verizon DSL which was cheaper and offered faster speeds

Reply 27 of 56, by jakethompson1

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Intel486dx33 wrote on 2020-05-30, 07:09:

I did not know Win NT 3.5.1 could support up to 32 CPU’s. Do you know of any computers or motherboards with 4 or more CPU’s ?
http://www.os2museum.com/wp/more-cpus-in-nt-3-x-workstation/

I remember reading that the limit came from using one bit per cpu in a 32-bit int. That is, it wasn't a practical limit, rather than the point at which software rather than hardware would be the bound on the number of CPUs.
Kind of like saying that an 80386DX can handle up to 4GB RAM but it's not like you can find a board that takes that obviously.

Reply 28 of 56, by swaaye

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Cool NT 3.51 writeup Chinny. 😀

chrismeyer6 wrote on 2020-06-23, 12:40:

I remember a similar experience when Adelphia first started offering cable modem service. You could see everyone's computers on the entire node. Which then prompted my parents to switch to Verizon DSL which was cheaper and offered faster speeds

I remember seeing this when a friend first got DSL. If I remember right the service provider just suggested disabling TCP/IP for the Windows file sharing service. Heh.

Reply 30 of 56, by chinny22

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I'm surprised how many people are saying their schools had a NT3 server. Did the education system get it cheap?
Would have thought peer to peer was good enough, Computer labs were pretty basic in those pre internet for everyone days

I know Microsoft made a deal with the Australian Education system, Not sure of the full details but know dad being a teacher got bring home a few volume licence CD's like Office and Windows and install it. That was very late 90's maybe early 2000's though.

Reply 31 of 56, by martinot

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chinny22 wrote on 2020-06-24, 21:38:

I'm surprised how many people are saying their schools had a NT3 server. Did the education system get it cheap?
Would have thought peer to peer was good enough, Computer labs were pretty basic in those pre internet for everyone days

I know Microsoft made a deal with the Australian Education system, Not sure of the full details but know dad being a teacher got bring home a few volume licence CD's like Office and Windows and install it. That was very late 90's maybe early 2000's though.

I do not know about US, but here in Sweden I got to buy NT 3.51 and NT 4 Workstation at academic price (around $70) as a student at the university.

Reply 32 of 56, by Intel486dx33

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chinny22 wrote on 2020-06-24, 21:38:

I'm surprised how many people are saying their schools had a NT3 server. Did the education system get it cheap?
Would have thought peer to peer was good enough, Computer labs were pretty basic in those pre internet for everyone days

I know Microsoft made a deal with the Australian Education system, Not sure of the full details but know dad being a teacher got bring home a few volume licence CD's like Office and Windows and install it. That was very late 90's maybe early 2000's though.

Well, i was in the computer education system where we had allot ot the latest tech and software.
But back in the early 1990’s it was Microsoft vs Novell vs. UNIX systems.
Novell was King of the Networks and Servers because they where easy and cheap to own.
Novell netware and Groupwise and Novell Database all came for FREE with the purchase of Novell server.
You could setup a Novell Server on a 486 computer with 8mb ram and 20mb harddrive.
And Novell could network Apple computers too.
In fact Apple use to use Novell to network there computers prior to OS X with tcp/ip .

Novell was more robust than WinNT 3.5.1 server.

Microsoft only supported Microsoft software.

But Universities in Silicon Valley did not start offering student discounts on software until about Windows XP.
But prior to that you could subscribe to Microsoft technet and get access to lots of beta and demo software.

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Reply 33 of 56, by appiah4

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chinny22 wrote on 2020-06-24, 21:38:

I'm surprised how many people are saying their schools had a NT3 server. Did the education system get it cheap?
Would have thought peer to peer was good enough, Computer labs were pretty basic in those pre internet for everyone days

I know Microsoft made a deal with the Australian Education system, Not sure of the full details but know dad being a teacher got bring home a few volume licence CD's like Office and Windows and install it. That was very late 90's maybe early 2000's though.

In my case, it was a private highschool funded by a foundation owned by one of the country's biggest conglomerates who also used to have a company that was a distributor of UNISYS computers, so they could source the hardware and software with ease. The PCs weren't great (Turbo XTs in one classroom and ATs in the other, then the XTs were replaced by 386SXs in mid 90s IIRC) but we had two computer labs in 1992 and Multimedia PCs with Encarta and stuff in the Library in 1995. I was lucky.

Retronautics: A digital gallery of my retro computers, hardware and projects.

Reply 34 of 56, by martinot

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Intel486dx33 wrote on 2020-06-25, 23:11:

But back in the early 1990’s it was Microsoft vs Novell vs. UNIX systems.

Those were the days! 😀

Intel486dx33 wrote on 2020-06-25, 23:11:

And Novell could network Apple computers too.

You could do that with NT 3.51 (and other NT versions) as well. I used to work with NT admin, and a with lot of Mac customers at the time.

Last edited by martinot on 2020-06-26, 13:13. Edited 2 times in total.

Reply 35 of 56, by martinot

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appiah4 wrote on 2020-06-26, 07:23:

In my case, it was a private highschool funded by a foundation owned by one of the country's biggest conglomerates who also used to have a company that was a distributor of UNISYS computers, so they could source the hardware and software with ease.

Nice!

UNISYS used to do some really cool servers and other stuff.

Reply 36 of 56, by martinot

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Intel486dx33 wrote on 2020-05-30, 07:09:

I did not know Win NT 3.5.1 could support up to 32 CPU’s. Do you know of any computers or motherboards with 4 or more CPU’s ?
http://www.os2museum.com/wp/more-cpus-in-nt-3-x-workstation/

Sequent used to do Windows servers, like the WinServer 5000 series, with up to 30 of either 486 or Pentium processors.

Shipped with up to 16 processors as standard, and the rest you had to install as add-ons yourself.

Reply 37 of 56, by martinot

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martinot wrote on 2020-06-26, 13:31:
Intel486dx33 wrote on 2020-05-30, 07:09:

I did not know Win NT 3.5.1 could support up to 32 CPU’s. Do you know of any computers or motherboards with 4 or more CPU’s ?
http://www.os2museum.com/wp/more-cpus-in-nt-3-x-workstation/

Sequent used to do Windows servers, like the WinServer 5000 series, with up to 30 of either 486 or Pentium processors.

Shipped with up to 16 processors as standard, and the rest you had to install as add-ons yourself.

Replying to my own post here, but googled a little bit and found some news around the WinServer 5000 series launch in 1993 (co-siding with launch of NT 3.1):

https://www.krsaborio.net/unix/research/1994/0404.htm

https://books.google.se/books?id=qjsEAAAAMBAJ … %205000&f=false

https://books.google.se/books?id=PA0AAAAAMBAJ … %205000&f=false

Reply 38 of 56, by spieler8

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It's interesting how time changes perspective. Back in the day I hated Microsoft with passion, as the whole Windows 9x line was unstable and crashed so often, as well as their business practices. Nowaday I understand what they achieved, given that back in the industry everyone was playing with these shady business tacticts, and technically with that slow and crappy hardware and zoo of configurations.
There's btw a very interesting read on how NT was born; the book is called: Show Stopper!: The Breakneck Race to Create Windows NT ...

Reply 39 of 56, by zPacKRat

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Intel486dx33 wrote on 2020-06-25, 23:11:
Well, i was in the computer education system where we had allot ot the latest tech and software. But back in the early 1990’s it […]
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chinny22 wrote on 2020-06-24, 21:38:

I'm surprised how many people are saying their schools had a NT3 server. Did the education system get it cheap?
Would have thought peer to peer was good enough, Computer labs were pretty basic in those pre internet for everyone days

I know Microsoft made a deal with the Australian Education system, Not sure of the full details but know dad being a teacher got bring home a few volume licence CD's like Office and Windows and install it. That was very late 90's maybe early 2000's though.

Well, i was in the computer education system where we had allot ot the latest tech and software.
But back in the early 1990’s it was Microsoft vs Novell vs. UNIX systems.
Novell was King of the Networks and Servers because they where easy and cheap to own.
Novell netware and Groupwise and Novell Database all came for FREE with the purchase of Novell server.
You could setup a Novell Server on a 486 computer with 8mb ram and 20mb harddrive.
And Novell could network Apple computers too.
In fact Apple use to use Novell to network there computers prior to OS X with tcp/ip .

Novell was more robust than WinNT 3.5.1 server.

Microsoft only supported Microsoft software.

But Universities in Silicon Valley did not start offering student discounts on software until about Windows XP.
But prior to that you could subscribe to Microsoft technet and get access to lots of beta and demo software.

Unlike a Windows BSOD, a Netware server would abend, sometimes not being noticed for years as the core functions kept on working, printing, check, files, check. no problem here .