Widescreen monitors and 4:3 aspect ratio compatibility thread

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Re: Widescreen monitors and 4:3 aspect ratio compatibility thread

Postby shamino » 2017-9-03 @ 03:59

Samsung 930b

1280x1024 5:4 TN, 8ms rise+fall response time. Officially supports 60Hz and 75Hz input. ~2005 monitor.
I've opened 2 of these. An earlier unit had a Samsung LTM190EX-L01 panel, a later one had an AU Optronics M190EN04. The unit used in this test has the AU Optronics panel, but I don't think that makes any difference for this test. Both should behave the same.
According to the datasheets, the Samsung LTM190EX-L01 panel supports VSync from 50-75Hz. The AU Optronics M190EN04 supports 56.25-77Hz (maybe the max has a tolerance from 75-77Hz, not sure I'm reading that part correctly). So the lower end of the range differs between panels, but that doesn't mean the video interface board will allow those rates.
I noticed that the 2 panels have very different specs for the rise and fall response times, one is faster at rising and the other faster at falling, but both add up to 8ms rise+fall as advertised for the monitor.

Side note: Even though both of these panels were used in Samsung 930B monitors, they have very different pinouts and are not compatible. I smoked something on the Samsung paneled unit when it's backlight died, and I swapped a panel that had the same pinout as the AU Optronics. After looking at the panel datasheets it's clear that was a mistake.


Samsung 930b with AU Optronics M190EN04 panel
Tested with Geforce2 MX AGP card.
This monitor stretches everything to 5:4.

When I originally ran this test, I noted some flickering of the screen in some modes. I've left those notes but I don't think the flickering is actually a monitor issue. I believe it's caused by "PC Players Benchmark" being a performance benchmark which doesn't use Vsync. This results in flickering, how much will vary with the speed of the system used. On another monitor where I saw the same issue, the flickering was gone when I ran real games.

BIOS: 5:4

DOS Command prompt: 5:4

DOS 320 x 200 game: 5:4 stretched, stable for first 1-2mins, then picture starts jumping occasionally.

DOS 640 x 400 game: 5:4 stretched, flickers occasionally, probably caused by lack of vsync in this test.

DOS 640 x 480 game: 5:4 stretched, after a few mins I did see a very rare flicker, it took some patience to catch it

DOS 800 x 600 game: 5:4 stretched, very rare flicker as with 640x480

DOS 1024 x 768 game: 5:4 stretched, stable

DOS 1280 x 1024 game: 5:4 native, stable

DOS 1600 x 200 game: 5:4 stretched, stable. Scales down to native res. OSD reports 1600x1200 but pops up the "non optimal resolution" warning. Lower modes didn't produce that warning.

Windows 640 x 480: 5:4 stretched

Windows 800 x 600: 5:4 stretched

Windows 1024 x 768: 5:4 stretched

Windows 1280 x 960: 5:4 stretched

Windows 1280 x 1024: 5:4 native

Windows: 1600 x 1200: not selectable (haven't figured out how to force it in Win98SE, but monitor should scale to native res as above. Have had this happen in a linux GUI, pretty sure it was stretched 5:4 like everything else)

Text vertical scrolling: 5:4, smooth scrolling
Last edited by shamino on 2017-9-23 @ 15:01, edited 5 times in total.
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Re: Widescreen monitors and 4:3 aspect ratio compatibility thread

Postby shamino » 2017-9-03 @ 07:40

Dell 1801FP

1280x1024 5:4 IPS

Tested with nVidia GT430 VGA output
This monitor stretches most things to 5:4, but 320x200 appeared to be 4:3

[edit: I recorded some flickering issues below. I now suspect these are not monitor issues. I saw the same thing in an earlier entry for the Lenovo L220x, and those issues went away when I tested that monitor with a slower system. It's likely the same applies here.]


BIOS graphical splash screen: 5:4
BIOS setup menu: letterboxed 4:3

DOS Command prompt: didn't pay close attention, think it was 5:4

DOS 320 x 200 game: 4:3 letterboxed - there was some black space above and below the text in PCPBench, so appears it was 4:3. Screen jumps every few seconds.

DOS 640 x 400 game: 5:4 stretched, severe flicker producing horizontal bars. But as with previous entries I'm not really sure whether these are monitor issues or caused by lack of vsync in PCPBench.

DOS 640 x 480 game: 5:4 stretched, severe flicker producing horizontal bars

DOS 800 x 600 game: 5:4 stretched, less flicker but still bad

DOS 1024 x 768 game: 5:4 stretched, static noise at top and bottom. Image is consistent (no bars or jumps) but still has high speed flicker. Might be lack of vsync.

DOS 1280 x 1024 game: 5:4 native, stable

DOS 1600 x 200 game: 5:4 stretched, stable. Scales to native res, there is no warning popup.

Windows 640 x 480: not selectable

Windows 800 x 600: 5:4 stretched, stable

Windows 1024 x 768: 5:4 stretched, stable

Windows 1280 x 960: 5:4 stretched, stable

Windows 1280 x 1024: native res

Windows: 1600 x 1200: not selectable. Don't know how to force it, but monitor should scale to native res as above.

Text vertical scrolling: 5:4, surprisingly smooth but has slight stutters. Prob 70->60Hz conversion.
Last edited by shamino on 2017-9-23 @ 15:01, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: Widescreen monitors and 4:3 aspect ratio compatibility thread

Postby Azarien » 2017-9-03 @ 14:46

dr_st wrote:Common DOS resolutions are not 4:3. Both 320x200 and 720x400 are widescreen resolutions. But old CRTs were 4:3, and so they distorted these resolutions to have non-square pixels. And because everyone knew that to be the case, they adjusted the characters and pictures to compensate for that.


I remember one weird case: Red Alert. DOS version of the game runs in 320x200. In Windows version, there are two available resolutions: 640x400 and 640x480. In 320x200 and 640x400 when stretched to 4:3 everything is distorted (more tall than it should be), and when you select 640x480 the game is still rendered in 640x400, then letterboxed to 640x480. And circles become actually circles.

I seems that the intended aspect ratio of the game was actually 16:10.
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Re: Widescreen monitors and 4:3 aspect ratio compatibility thread

Postby shamino » 2017-9-12 @ 16:12

Samsung 943SWX
18.5" 16:9 1360x768 TN
response time advertised as 5ms

Overall result:
Suitable for 4:3 usage, particularly with 1024x768 mode. Can replace a 15" 1024x768.
Has a front panel button for stretched vs unstretched display. The options are "wide" and "auto". "Auto" will crop the sides to maintain proper dimensions. To toggle between "auto" and "wide", you just need to tap that button twice to switch modes (once to bring up the menu, again to change the setting).
If the source resolution is not 1024x768 then the "auto" mode will still be subject to fractional scaling. There is no 1:1 mode.

The cropped 4:3 area of the screen is 1024x768 and is just barely larger than a 15" 4:3 LCD. It's close enough to a 15" 1024x768 that you could match it up with them and make the world's smallest triple monitor rig, if that's your thing.


Below was tested in "auto" mode with the VGA input from a Geforce2 MX socket 7 machine.

BIOS: 4:3
DOS Command prompt: 4:3
DOS 320 x 200 game: 4:3
DOS 640 x 400 game: 4:3
DOS 640 x 480 game: 4:3
DOS 800 x 600 game: 4:3
DOS 1024 x 768 game: 4:3 - 1:1 pixel mapping in this mode

DOS 1280 x 1024 game: 4:3 - displays this without complaint, but text clarity suffers
DOS 1600 x 200 game: 4:3 - displays but pops up a warning message, have to hit a button to clear it. Text is fuzzy.

Text vertical scrolling: 4:3 and smooth

Windows 640 x 480: 4:3
Windows 800 x 600: 4:3
Windows 1024 x 768: 4:3
Windows 1280 x 1024: not offered
Windows: 1600 x 1200: not offered

Windows: 1280 x 768: - cropped with 1:1 pixel mapping. Not sure why this mode was offered, but with monitor size set to "auto", it will display with the appropriate amount of cropping at each side.
Windows: 1360 x 768: - 16:9 native
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Re: Widescreen monitors and 4:3 aspect ratio compatibility thread

Postby s0ren » 2017-12-06 @ 15:45

Philips 240B7QPJEB

Very similar to u2412m but with some key differences:
5ms grey to grey (8ms for u2412m - not that i notice the difference)
HDMI port instead of DVI
Very thin bezels
Flicker free
Build in speakers
USB 3.0 support with quick charge
Better height adjustment range
In addition to 16:10 and 4:3 modes, it also supports 16:9 and 1:1 which i personally find very useful. Auto not supported on either.
It has a power sensor that detects if a person is in front of the monitor and turns off the back light if there is no one there
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