VOGONS


Reply 13740 of 17893, by derSammler

User metadata
Rank l33t
Rank
l33t

Cleaned, fixed, and tested a couple of C64/Atari joysticks yesterday and today. Was quite interesting to see the differences in their construction and to choose the one that feels best while playing. May post more details in a separate thread later.

Reply 13741 of 17893, by bjwil1991

User metadata
Rank l33t
Rank
l33t

I have a QuickShot II for the C64/Atari 2600 that I got for $0.25 one day and got it all cleaned out. I used BASIC to test the joystick and the port along with an Atari 2600 controller connected to the other port to make sure they both work.

Discord: https://discord.gg/U5dJw7x
Systems from C64 to FX-6300.

Reply 13743 of 17893, by PTherapist

User metadata
Rank Oldbie
Rank
Oldbie

I was always a fan of the QuickShot II Turbo (the red base / black stick ones). Though they don't age very well as they're not very well built inside.

In saying that though, I did recently get hold of 2 Archer Joysticks that were a rebadge of the QuickShot II Turbo, but they were built even more shoddily and literally fell to pieces when I tried to repair them.

I still have 2 QuickShot II Turbos, 1 works great but is a little over sensitive on the up axis whilst the other has some issues with holding down certain directions and firing at the same time (I'll get around to fixing that one day).

Reply 13744 of 17893, by TheAbandonwareGuy

User metadata
Rank Oldbie
Rank
Oldbie
PTherapist wrote:

I was always a fan of the QuickShot II Turbo (the red base / black stick ones). Though they don't age very well as they're not very well built inside.

In saying that though, I did recently get hold of 2 Archer Joysticks that were a rebadge of the QuickShot II Turbo, but they were built even more shoddily and literally fell to pieces when I tried to repair them.

I still have 2 QuickShot II Turbos, 1 works great but is a little over sensitive on the up axis whilst the other has some issues with holding down certain directions and firing at the same time (I'll get around to fixing that one day).

Are earlier Quickshots actually decent joysticks? I have a gameport Quickshot Warrior from around the late Windows 3.1 era and that thing is hot garbage. It was new in box when I received it and I never could get it calibrated or functioning well.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuFY6ZVlYOXA12tV8b00x_A
1996|P200MMX|64MB EDO|Virge DX 4MB|SB16 OPL3
1999|P3 933|384MB SDR|GF2 Ultra 64MB|CT4620
#Bernie2020 #FeelTheBern

Reply 13745 of 17893, by wirerogue

User metadata
Rank Member
Rank
Member

merry christmas to me.
installed some upgrades for my pentium 4 rig.
asus p4c800-e deluxe, geforce 6800 ultra and corsair xms platinum ddr-500

upgrade.jpg
Filename
upgrade.jpg
File size
950.25 KiB
Views
529 views
File license
Fair use/fair dealing exception

AEAVEwk.png

Reply 13746 of 17893, by derSammler

User metadata
Rank l33t
Rank
l33t
TheAbandonwareGuy wrote:

Are earlier Quickshots actually decent joysticks? I have a gameport Quickshot Warrior from around the late Windows 3.1 era and that thing is hot garbage. It was new in box when I received it and I never could get it calibrated or functioning well.

You can't really compare the PC ones with those for Atari/Amiga/C64, as they are completely different inside, even if they may look the same. However, apart from the Quickshot II Plus (1984) and Quickshot II Turbo (1985), I would avoid the rest.

Reply 13747 of 17893, by appiah4

User metadata
Rank l33t++
Rank
l33t++

I was lucky enough to own a QuickShot II Turbo when I had my Atari 800XL and it was awesome. I really enjoyed the QuickShot II Plus on a friend's C64 - it was pretty good.

That said, my experience is worthless today. Majority of my 8/16-bit home computer gaming was done with QuickShot Python 1s which I also loved back then, but can't stand today.

Pretty much all joysticks were probably shit back then.

Retronautics: A digital gallery of my retro computers, hardware and projects.

Reply 13748 of 17893, by derSammler

User metadata
Rank l33t
Rank
l33t

QuickShot II Turbo on an Atari 800XL? That's what I had set up 2 days ago. 😁

I don't think these joysticks were bad back then. It's just that we abused them rather hard when we were young. On the one hand because we didn't care, on the other hand because the games demanded that. Now there were some really shitty joysticks back then as well, no question.

Reply 13750 of 17893, by wirerogue

User metadata
Rank Member
Rank
Member
oeuvre wrote:

damn, that bad boy requires 2 molex plugs

somehow, santa knew exactly what i wanted.
i must have been extra good this year. 😀

AEAVEwk.png

Reply 13751 of 17893, by looking4awayout

User metadata
Rank Member
Rank
Member

Been working on setting up the interim TUV4X, so when the replacement arrives I'll have everything up and running once again. In the meantime, I had some fun at overclocking the new RDD motherboard. First, I begun by increasing the FSB in the BIOS, and managed to reach a stable overclock at 154MHz of FSB and 1.5v core voltage. If I tried to go beyond 154MHz, the system would fail to POST when you turned it on. Since I have fitted two 1GB ECC sticks, I've enabled ECC mode and made the machine stable. I was happy.

Then, I remembered I had SetFSB in my data drive, and thought to give it a spin, to see if I could push the FSB a little bit more. And fate has been friendly to me, since the program supports the PLL of my motherboard!

That allowed me to push the FSB up to 165MHz (with the memory running at 3-2-2-6), although I had to raise the core voltage to 1.7v in order to stabilize it, and as a safety measure, I also have increased the I/O voltage to 3.6v. I've been stress testing it with 3DMark 99, 2001SE and 2003, ran Final Reality and then a 32M run of SuperPi. The system is rock solid.

I've been amazed by how fast it became, the Tualatin can surely pack a punch. Now it's running at 1728MHz without breaking a sweat, and none of the cards are having issues despite the AGP and PCI busses are running out of spec.

Now, I just hope to find other two 1GB PC133 ECC sticks that can run stable at such an high frequency, so I can expand the RAM of the system to 4GB, which is incredibly overkill, but who cares: 4GB of RAM on a Tualatin is cool nonethless. 🤣

My Retro Daily Driver: Pentium !!!-S 1.7GHz | 2GB PC166 ECC SDRAM | Gecube Radeon X1950 Pro 256MB OC | 128GB Lite-On SSD + 500GB WD Blue SSD | Creative Sound Blaster Live! CT4620 | Windows XP Professional SP3

Reply 13753 of 17893, by Old PC Hunter

User metadata
Rank Member
Rank
Member

Today I installed my brand new AdLib replica card into my 286 machine. The AdLib works beautifully, and it is a big improvement over the PC speaker. Tommorow's upgrades will consist of an 80287 XL, and a game port joystick card. Over the weekend, i'll do my final upgrade to the 286, which will be a CPU swap from the AMD 8 MHZ 286 to my NOS Harris 20 MHZ 286. Ive also bought an oscilliator socket and oscilliators to run the CPU at 10, 12 or 16 MHZ, depending on what my board and ISA bus handles. I'm a bit scared that i'll mess up the soldering job, but it's only 4 pins and i'll make sure to practice good until the weekend when I finally do the swap.

I also got a Sound Blaster X FI SB 0460 today and I installed that in my XP-era gaming rig. I have good headphones, and I am amazed at how immersive EAX audio technology is in games such as F.E.A.R. The SB card also makes music sound slightly better and it allows me to plug in multiple outputs at once.

Set up retro boxes:
DOS:286 10 MHZ/ET4000AX1MB/270 MB HDD/4 MB RAM/Adlib/80287 XL
W98:P2 450/Radeon 7000 64 MB/23 GB HDD/SB 16 clone/384 MB RAM
XP:ATHLON X2 6000+/2 GB RAM/Radeon X1900XTX/2x120 GB SSD/1x160 GB and 1x250 GB 7.2k HDD's/ECS A740 GM-M/SB X-Fi

Reply 13754 of 17893, by appiah4

User metadata
Rank l33t++
Rank
l33t++

Yay another adlib clone! Photos of the card? I sometimes wonder if I should replace the ES688+MusicQuest combintion in my 1987-1989 386SX25 (which is basically a stand-in 286) with Adlib+MusicQuest.. There are no games prior to 1990 that actually take advantage of SB's OPL3 or digital sound let alone an SB Pro, right?

Retronautics: A digital gallery of my retro computers, hardware and projects.

Reply 13755 of 17893, by ragefury32

User metadata
Rank Member
Rank
Member

Got my hands on a Mid-2010 MacBook Pro 13, rescued from the ol' corporate discard pile.

Pre-SSD.png
Filename
Pre-SSD.png
File size
883.86 KiB
Views
330 views
File license
Fair use/fair dealing exception

Core 2 Duo P8600 (2.4GHz), 4GB of RAM, 250GB 5400rpm spinner, 8x Superdrive.

Not a bad machine per-se - as it contains nVidia's Geforce 320M/MCP89 chipset, which is a very good integrated chipset. It's the only Core 2 Mobile chipset that will allow 8GB DDR3 DIMMs per socket, yielding 16GB of RAM total (must be PC8500/1066MHz RAM, though. Any higher timing and the machine will simply not work). The integrated graphics performance were arguably better than the Intel HD3000 (Sandy)/HD4000 (Ivy) integrated GPUs and match the Geforce 8600 Go on normal usage, which is good for older games like Quake 4, Battlefield 2142, NHL 2002 and Star Wars Battlefront (the 2004 release). Man, I really miss old-school Apple and their repairability. Especially when compared to the current generation MBP13 sitting at my desk in the office.

Post SSD and 16GB RAM.png
Filename
Post SSD and 16GB RAM.png
File size
807 KiB
Views
330 views
File license
Fair use/fair dealing exception

So, what to do? Swap out the 4GB, tried some other pieces of RAM sitting at the old homestead (the G.Skill Ripjaw is PC3L-12800 if I remember correctly, and it refused to run on the machine at all), eventually found a pair of 8GB PC3-8500, popped in a Samsung Qvo 960 1TB SSD and reinstalled MacOS 10.13 (last version to have full CUDA support and works with non-metal compliant GPUs). The machine is held back by the Core 2 Duo/Penryn CPU, though. I kinda wished that nVidia didn't exit the chipset business and actually released the MCP99 for the Nehalem based mobiles.

USB-PD to L-Tip Magsafe.png
Filename
USB-PD to L-Tip Magsafe.png
File size
549.07 KiB
Views
330 views
File license
Fair use/fair dealing exception

Purchased and ran the machine off a 60w rated USB-C PD to Magsafe L-Tip adapter (because the Apple originals are such a piece of fragile crap, plus my power bricks/power banks are all USB-C PD nowadays). Works well enough.

UT2004.png
Filename
UT2004.png
File size
839.94 KiB
Views
330 views
File license
Fair use/fair dealing exception

Long term plans? Use it as an Era 6 vintage gaming machine - probably going to install a Bootcamp environment for Windows XP and Windows 7 (or 10), just to run some DX9 and 10/11 stuff on the hardware respectively.

On other news, finished Rowan's Airpower: Battle in the skies, working on a Dosbox/bare-metal install/config guide (SVGA support was a massive pain)/game review.

Look at my vampire, look at it.png
Filename
Look at my vampire, look at it.png
File size
116.91 KiB
Views
330 views
File license
Fair use/fair dealing exception

Reply 13756 of 17893, by Old PC Hunter

User metadata
Rank Member
Rank
Member
appiah4 wrote:

Yay another adlib clone! Photos of the card? I sometimes wonder if I should replace the ES688+MusicQuest combintion in my 1987-1989 386SX25 (which is basically a stand-in 286) with Adlib+MusicQuest.. There are no games prior to 1990 that actually take advantage of SB's OPL3 or digital sound let alone an SB Pro, right?

I unfourtunately did not get any pics of the card before I put it in. Ill put the manufacturer's stock photo below. It's a exact replica of the AdLib, execpt for the fact it has a different logo due to copyright reasons I am assuming. Personally, I feel like installing an Adlib into that system would be a good period correct choice. The good thing about the Adlib is the fact that you do not have to fiddle with jumpers or install drivers to get it to work. My card had all the jumpers not installed, but there is an option to install pin headers if you would like. You just plug the card in, and select the AdLib option in games, and everything works. I paid about 60 bucks for mine, pre assembled. It's a really good card. No clue what the volume knob on the back of mine is set at, but it is very loud and crisp. As far as games before 1990 supporting OPL3, I don't think that was a thing back then. There were some that took advantage of the Sound Blaster's PCM channel if I remember correctly, but personally I don't think you'd be missing out if you replaced the ESS688 with an AdLib. I think the SB Pro came out in 1991, so as far as games before 1990 using it I don't think so.

Attachments

  • s-l400 (1).jpg
    Filename
    s-l400 (1).jpg
    File size
    38.58 KiB
    Views
    315 views
    File comment
    RadLib Sound Card
    File license
    Fair use/fair dealing exception

Set up retro boxes:
DOS:286 10 MHZ/ET4000AX1MB/270 MB HDD/4 MB RAM/Adlib/80287 XL
W98:P2 450/Radeon 7000 64 MB/23 GB HDD/SB 16 clone/384 MB RAM
XP:ATHLON X2 6000+/2 GB RAM/Radeon X1900XTX/2x120 GB SSD/1x160 GB and 1x250 GB 7.2k HDD's/ECS A740 GM-M/SB X-Fi

Reply 13757 of 17893, by appiah4

User metadata
Rank l33t++
Rank
l33t++

Nice.. Did it come with a metal bracket? Mine was my own solder project so it's not as clean as yours. It also has a volume shaft that is a few mm longer and and lacks a metal bracket, but I think it cost me half of what you paid so I can't complaing 🤣

Tube-Time-Adlib-Bracket-Replacement.jpg

Retronautics: A digital gallery of my retro computers, hardware and projects.

Reply 13758 of 17893, by kaputnik

User metadata
Rank Oldbie
Rank
Oldbie
appiah4 wrote:

Nice.. Did it come with a metal bracket? Mine was my own solder project so it's not as clean as yours. It also has a volume shaft that is a few mm longer and and lacks a metal bracket, but I think it cost me half of what you paid so I can't complaing 🤣

If you really want a metal bracket, it wouldn't be much harder than drilling two holes in a blank bracket with a step drill bit. A cheap one from Ebay or Aliexpress is good enough for that job. Drill on low rpm, with the bracket firmly clamped to a piece of wood.

Fastening tabs could be made from any piece of sheet metal, and soldered on with regular electronics solder. You'll probably need liquid flux for a good result though. Otherwise it's surprisingly simple to DIY a working spot welding machine, in it's basest form, only an old transformer and a piece of heavy gauge cable to replace the secondary winding is needed 😀

Reply 13759 of 17893, by derSammler

User metadata
Rank l33t
Rank
l33t
derSammler wrote:

Cleaned, fixed, and tested a couple of C64/Atari joysticks yesterday and today. Was quite interesting to see the differences in their construction and to choose the one that feels best while playing. May post more details in a separate thread later.

I settled on using this one, btw:

IMG_20191226_121243261.jpg

A Quickjoy II Turbo. It has the cheapest construction of all the various joysticks I own, but after cleaning and fixing it, it feels just as good as the other ones. Also, I have two of these; so should this one break, it's not much of a loss.