VOGONS


List the CPUs you owned when they were new

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Reply 100 of 118, by F2bnp

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kanecvr wrote:

FPU performance ... weekend.

Hi again! I look forward to your tests, I always enjoy these benchmarks/comparisons! I am intrigued to see what you'll show us 😀.

I'm basing my conclusions from my own tests:
Pentium II/III VS K6-III+
This was the second one I did which was more cohesive and complete, I also did a few other tests some years prior.

Yes, Quake was very much 100% Pentium optimized in order to get that kind of performance, so it should be taken with skepticism, GLQuake slightly less so, as the differences aren't quite as dramatic. Still, I was doing some tests earlier this week and happened to compare an MMX 233 and a Pentium II 233, it was quite a bit faster even in Quake.
I'm thinking those old benchmarks probably didn't run FastVID which kills performance on P6 platforms.

Reply 101 of 118, by AlaricD

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When new:
65C10
Am386DX-40 (and Cx387DX-40)
Cx486DLC-40
Am486DX2-80
Pentium 100MHz
Pentium 200MHz
Celeron 300A (@450MHz)
Tualatin-core P3 (forgot speed 🙁 )
Athlon 2500+ (Barton Core)
Pentium M 1.4GHz
Core i7-920
Core i7-6700K

Others I got when they weren't new (roughly in order of performance)
Zilog 80
Intel 8088
65C816
Intel 8086
Intel 186 @10MHz
Intel 286
Intel 486DX2-66
P3-Xeon @550MHz "Tanner" (x2)

I think that covers it.

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Reply 102 of 118, by kanecvr

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F2bnp wrote:
Hi again! I look forward to your tests, I always enjoy these benchmarks/comparisons! I am intrigued to see what you'll show us : […]
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kanecvr wrote:

FPU performance ... weekend.

Hi again! I look forward to your tests, I always enjoy these benchmarks/comparisons! I am intrigued to see what you'll show us 😀.

I'm basing my conclusions from my own tests:
Pentium II/III VS K6-III+
This was the second one I did which was more cohesive and complete, I also did a few other tests some years prior.

Yes, Quake was very much 100% Pentium optimized in order to get that kind of performance, so it should be taken with skepticism, GLQuake slightly less so, as the differences aren't quite as dramatic. Still, I was doing some tests earlier this week and happened to compare an MMX 233 and a Pentium II 233, it was quite a bit faster even in Quake.
I'm thinking those old benchmarks probably didn't run FastVID which kills performance on P6 platforms.

Spoiler - results are a bit different then what my thread contained, but to a small (although relevant) percentage. I'm also including a K6-2 and a Celeron to the benchmark suite, for witch I am running tests now.

Reply 103 of 118, by candle_86

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1998 Pentium 133 (my first computer Christmas 98) - Upgraded to PEntium MMX in 2000
2001 K6-2+ 450 (Bought computer from a flea market with money earned during hauling hay)
2002 Athlon XP 17000+ (Bought new with money earned doing concrete when i was 15)
2005 AMD Sempron 2200+ (AXP 1700 died and had to be replaced)
2006 Athlon 64 X2 3800 AM2
2010 AMD Phenom X4 9650
2011 Intel Core i5 2500k
2013 Intel Core i7 3930k (traded rig for a car after mine blew an engine)
2013 Intel Core 2 Quad Q6600 (what I could afford after selling 3930k)
2014 Intel Core i5 4590k
2016 Ryzen 5 1600
2018 Intel Core i7 3770 (Sold Ryzen rig after I got laid off, bought what i currently use once i started getting unemployeement)

Reply 104 of 118, by Tiido

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There's only been one : AMD Athlon64 X2 4000+
Maaaaybe one day I'll buy a new computer, then there will be a second entry 🤣

T-04YBSC, a new YMF71x based sound card & Official VOGONS thread about it
Newly made 4MB 60ns 30pin SIMMs ~
mida sa loed ? nagunii aru ei saa 😜

Reply 105 of 118, by dionb

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When new...

NEC/Zilog Z80A 3.5MHz
NEC/Zilog Z80A 3.5MHz (successive Sinclair computers stayed very similar in terms of CPU)
Intel 386-16
Intel Pentium 60
Intel Celeron 366
Intel Celeron 433 (my C366 system died, I thought it was the CPU. Stupidly I bought a new one before confirming that)
Intel Pentium 3-700E
AMD Duron 800
AMD AthlonXP 1800+
AMD Athlon64 3200+
AMD Athlon64 X2 3800+
Intel Core2Duo E8200
Intel Core i7 860
Intel Core i7 2600 - and still running on that one.

14 CPUs in 37 years - but most of them between 1999 and 2004, and no new CPUs the last >5y.

Reply 106 of 118, by stalk3r

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MOS 6510
AMD 386DX40 <--- loved this one
AMD 486DX4-100
Intel Pentium 166
Intel Celeron 366
Intel Pentium 4 - 3Ghz

The rest I cannot recall and at some point I switched to company laptops/PCs, so stopped taking care of what CPUs they have

Reply 107 of 118, by mpe

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My route:

MOS 6510 (or whatever the C64 had)
AMD 386DX-40
Intel Pentium 75
IDT C6 200
Intel Celeron 300A
dual Intel Celeron 366
Intel Pentium 4 1.8A Northwood
Intel Core i5-750 2.66 Lynnfield
Intel Core i5 (I5-2557M) Sandy Bridge
Intel Core i5 (I5-4278U) Haswell
Intel Core i5 (I5-6600) Skylake
Intel Xeon W 3.2 GHz 8-core (right now)

Interestingly, the biggest performance step was from 1 to 2. Each other upgrade was less and less noticeable. Moore's law is a BS 😀

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Reply 108 of 118, by HanJammer

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Not counting the 'retro' CPUs (only these I used in non-retro PCs)

CPUs I used:
AMD K5 PR133 (sold)
AMD K6-2 300MHz (I still have it!)
AMD Athlon 600MHz Slot A (I still have it!)
AMD Athlon 64 3000MHz (I still have it!)
AMD Athlon 64 X2 5200MHz (sold)
AMD FX 6300 (sold)
AMD FX 8950 (sold)
AMD Ryzen 1700X (still in use!)

Not since it was new:
AMD 286-16MHz (sold 🙁(( )
AMD K6-2 450MHz (I still have it!)
AMD Athlon 1000MHz Slot A (Orion core) (I still have it!)

Reason I still have most of these CPUs is that I used them for so long, that I wouldn't sell them for a good amount of money.

Want to buy AT cases, motherboards and other vintage stuff? My Items for Sale
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Reply 109 of 118, by einr

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1995: Intel DX4/100
1998: Intel Pentium II/266

[large gap where I starting around 2003 I used an AMD Duron 800 that I got really cheap from a friend, not new...]

2006-ish: AMD Athlon64 3000+
2009-ish: AMD Athlon II X2 250
2012-ish: AMD Phenom II 965 BE

That's it... 😉 I still have no compelling reason to upgrade from the 965.

Reply 110 of 118, by RaverX

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Cyrix 6x86 233
Athlon 900 socket A -> upgraded to Athlon XP 1700+
Pentium 4 3.2 GHz Extreme Edition
Core2 Duo E8200 -> upgraded to Core2 Quad Q9450
i7 940 -> upgraded to i7 980
i7 5820k

Those were my CPUs used in my "main rig" during the years. I had quite a few others CPUs, but they were used for a short time (they were sold fast or just used for testing or for friends).

Reply 111 of 118, by rmay635703

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1992 Tandy 1000rlx 10mhz AMD 286 512kb vga FDD ONLY

1992 QLT Futura 100 14.7mhz 68010 cpu , 4mb system ram, 1.25mb dual port vram (Video capture) Targa graphics, Kodak Fllashsync RGB Camera, Panasonic Omniflex printer, 120mb scsi, system 6.2

1995 AST ADVENTURE ADVANTAGE 4/66D all in one (cyrix)
1996 Generic PCCHIPS AMD 5x86-133 4mb ram 1.2gb hd
1997 Generic Cyrix PR200, 8mb ram, 1.6gb hd
1998 Generic Cyrix PR233, m571 32mb sdram integrated 4mb video
2000 Vertex AMD K6-2 450 48mb of mixed ram
2003 AMD duron 700, 256md sdram, pcchips all in one, 60gb hd

Reply 114 of 118, by Murugan

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1) 8088
2) 386DX-33
3) Pentium 75
4) P3-500
5) Pentium 4 2.8
6) Pentium D 3.0 I think

From then on I kinda stopped buying new hardware.

My retro collection: too much...

Reply 115 of 118, by FFXIhealer

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1. Intel Pentium P54c (100MHz/66FSB) [1996 - 1999]
Ah yes, the old Packard Bell. This PC brings back memories. It was the first PC with a modem that actually worked, internet that actually worked. I remember having to unspool a long phone cable half-way across the house in order to use it, and then coil it back up when I was done. I was in high school and this little computer was great for DOS gaming, but sucked at Windows gaming since the video chip was built into the motherboard and only had 1MB of video memory. And we had no upgrades either. A whopping 16MB of 72-pin memory let Windows 95 work great, though driver updates did sometimes cause blue-screens that I'd have to fix. Old 1.8GB hard drive seemed massive at the time.

2. Intel Pentium II "Deschutes" (350MHz/100FSB) [1999 - 2002]
Oh hell yeah. This was my first actual gaming PC. I was in college "learning to code" as it were, and didn't want to be stuck in the computer lab for hours either waiting on a PC or doing the work and tying up the PC for others. So I talked my father into investing in my own higher-powered PC and I snuck a great sound card and what I thought at the time was a good video card: Diamond Stealth II G460 8MB AGP card with the Intel i740 graphics chip. 128MB PC-100 SDRAM made sure I never came close to running out of memory in Windows 98 (First Edition), and the bump up to the 100MHz FSB meant all-around performance boosts in compiling code AND playing games. The 10GB Maxtor hard drive died on me and I lost everything, which pissed me off and I swore I'd never buy another Maxtor drive (a vow I have kept to this day). I also got the legendary Asus P2B motherboard with the 440BX chipset, which I STILL HAVE and still works to this day, though with a newer 600MHz Pentium III in it now. I played many games on this thing, including Half-Life and Final Fantasy 7+8.

3. AMD Athlon XP 1800+ "Palomino" (~1.53GHz/133FSB) [2002 - 2005] Windows XP SP2
This was a rebuilt/refresh of my gaming PC as I neared completing my college years. I made the jump to Windows XP as well, but started with only 256MB of PC-133 which I later doubled to 512MB. Unfortunately as we all know, SP2 ruined that for all of us and I didn't know it at the time. Started with a Radeon 7500 and then "upgraded" to a Radeon 9550xl (#facepalm). First PC with a DVD drive to watch movies on and a 5.1 channel sound card (Sound Blaster Live! 5.1).

4. Intel Pentium M 770 "Dothan" (2.1GHz) [2005 - Present] Windows XP SP3
Joined the Army in 2005 and bought my first laptop, in this case the Dell Inspiron XPS Gen 2 that I still have to this day. Boasting 2GB of DDR2-533 memory and a 7800GTX PCI-e graphics card with a 1920x1200 17" LCD display, this beast kept me gaming through my 2009 deployment to Afghanistan and my return in 2010, when I began to plan my next upgrade.

5. Intel Core 2 Duo E7400 "Wolfdale" (2.8GHz) [2008 - 2016] Windows Vista
Built a new computer in 2008 to replace my mother's horribly aging Windows Me computer and stepped her right up to this Core 2 Duo running Windows Vista with 4GB of DDR2-800 memory. The thing ran FLAWLESSLY until it was retired in 2016 due to lack of support for Google Chrome and Internet Explorer. Video card was just an office 8400GS card who's fan eventually died soon after the 2016 system upgrade. Was replaced with a GT1030, which is severe overkill for what she uses the computer for.

6. Intel Core i7-860 "Lynnfield" (2.8GHz) [2010 - Present] Windows 7/10
Oh yeah, talk about pure adrenaline-pumping hardcore gaming. This is my Final Fantasy 14 PC. This is the first real gaming PC I was truly hyped about. Brand new Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit on a 1TB Western Digital Black 7,200RPM HDD, 16GB of DDR3-1600 memory (which cost me well over $300 at the time, by the way), a $350 motherboard in an MSI Big Bang Trinergy, giving me 16x/16x PCI-Express 2.0 lanes... which I used to power - 2x nVidia GeForce GTX 480 graphics cards in SLI. BEAST MODE ACTIVATED! Plus, when it got cold outside, I just put some games to run and I could put my feet behind my computer and keep my toes nice and warm.
This system has been upgraded and maintained to this day and runs Windows 10 off of a Samsung 850 EVO perfectly, though limited to SATA2 speeds (3Gbps), as is a limitation of the motherboard. I'm also in the process of gathering parts to finally complete the original vision for the computer: a full liquid-cooling loop. I even bought a Thermaltake Versa H26 case to house the full loop, as it will have one pump, three heatsinks, and two different radiators (a 360 for the two graphics cards and a 240 for the CPU). But I'm being very picky about my parts for the loop because I want it to be aesthetically pleasing (with the tempered glass side-panel of the Versa G26) and work great. I'm still trying to decide if trying to do hard-tubing bends is worth the effort over just going with soft tubing to make it easier. Hard tubing will look much better, but I've NEVER DONE IT, so I'm liable to *#@% up a lot before I get things right and I don't exactly have a massive fortune of money stashed away to spend on this. Graphics cards will be cooled in parallel and I already have the GPU blocks and the 240 rad. Just need to get the CPU block, 360 rad, pump and res combo and install everything.

7. Intel Core i7-6700K "Skylake" (4.0GHz) [2015 - Present] Windows 1
My current gaming rig. It was also beast mode when I put it together as I installed Windows 10 fresh onto a Samsung SM951 m.2 PCI-Express AHCI hard drive. Yes, I got a PCI-e m.2 drive before they went mainstream. I kinda wish I had one of the new 960s with NVMe installed now, but it's not worth the cost to switch them out and I really wouldn't see much of a gain. It also has a 1TB Samsung 850 EVO for games and a 3TB Seagate 7,200RPM hard drive for backups and file storage. Graphics are provided by a ($650) GTX 980ti pushing 3x monitors, the main center one being an Acer Predator 1440p 144Hz G-Sync 27" gaming display that cost more than the video card ($800). It also has 16GB of DDR4-3200 and the MB supports up to 64GB. If I upgrade anything on this system later, it'll probably be the graphics card.

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Reply 116 of 118, by tegrady

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IBM Blue Lightning 50MHZ
Pentium 133mhz
Pentium II 300mhz
Celeron 466mhz
Pentium 3 800mhz
Pentium 4 2.26ghz
Pentium 4 3.06ghz
Core 2 Duo 2.4ghz
Core 2 Quad Q9650 3.0ghz
i7 4790k
i7 8700k

Reply 117 of 118, by blank001

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Skipping a few along the way but

pentium 100mhz
pentium ii 350
pentium !!! 600e
athlon xp 1.4
pentium 4 1.6a
c2d E6600
i7 2600k

I try to delay upgrading until I can upgrade to a chip I think will be a classic someday.

_: K6-III+ 450apz@550, P5A-B, 128Mb CL2, Voodoo 5500 AGP, MX300, AWE64 Gold 32mb, SC-55v2.0
_: Pentium III 1400 S, TUSL2-C, 512Mb CL2, Voodoo 5500 AGP, MX300

Reply 118 of 118, by RandomStranger

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I'm probably one of the young ones here with the age of 29. I mostly had severely outdated hardware up until the late-2000s and never bothered with high-end stuff. Since 2010 it's not even an issue. I feel like progression slowed down a lot since the introduction of Sandy Bridge.

1997 - Am386DX-40
1999 - Pentium 100MHz
2001 - Celeron 900MHz (Pentium 200MHz for a short time, but it was too underpowered)
2004 - Celeron 2.4GHz (Northwood)
2009 - Athlon X2 5050e (I wanted a power efficient PC)
2011 - Phenom II 710
2014 - Phenom II X6 1055T
2018 - Core i5 3570

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