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List the CPUs you owned when they were new

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Reply 80 of 118, by cyclone3d

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jade_angel wrote:

The reason the K6-2 was interesting is that it was cheaper and used cheaper motherboards. It was never faster than any contemporary Intel design - it was never really even in striking distance. The K6-III+ was, kinda, but by the time it came out, the P2/400 or P2/450 ran rings around it. It could trade blows with a P2/333, at least. AMD didn't fight Intel on level terrain until the Athlon came out (and then it was slightly faster per clock as well as equally clocked). K6 vs P2 was a more unequal fight than Bulldozer vs Haswell. (At least Bulldozer rigs are fast enough for current-at-the-time games; the same could not be consistently said of the K6.)

I do remember that the cost delta between a K6 machine and a P2/P3 was quite large. The Celeron, not quite so much, but really, you had to overclock them to do well, and if you didn't know your onions, overclocking seemed like black magic.

When I was purchasing K6-2 CPUs, my work computer had a Pentium II 266 that I overclocked to 300 to try to make it more useable.

I was also overclocking K6-2 CPUs at the time. Fastest I ever ran was a K6-2 550 @ 660 on an ASUS P5A.

The ALI Aladdin V chipset was quite a bit faster than then Via chipsets.

As for my "new" cpu progression....

1991 - 386 SX-25 the 486 was already out, but this was the first computer my family had.

Next new CPU I bought new was an AMD 5x86-133. Not sure what year, Pentiums were already out.

K6
K6-2 (multiple)

Slot-A Athlons. Those were the bomb-diggity. Buy a 500Mhz, and crack it open to find a 650Mhz core. The faster ones usually also had a faster than labeled core.

Socket A Athlons.

Athlon XP
And then the Athlon XP period hit and I was on those for quite a while.

Athlon 64 and Opteron
After that phase, I bought an Athlon 64 3700+ and then on to an Opteron 175 which I de-lidded to drop the load temp by about 20c.

Q6600
Then it was all over for AMD when the Core2 stuff came out because of Intel's nasty dealings to hurt AMD's marketshare. My next new rig will most likely be AMD based
as they have finally pulled their collective heads out of their rears and built something worth buying. I love to see Intel sweat 😁

i7-920 then to a Xeon after the 920 died a sudden death after a few years.

i7-4930k

Yamaha YMF modified setupds and drivers
Yamaha XG resource repository - updated November 27, 2018
Yamaha YMF7x4 Guide
AW744L II - YMF744 - AOpen Cobra Sound Card - Install SB-Link Header

Reply 81 of 118, by bjwil1991

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1992 - 286 (my dad built the system) and it had the Hard Card (Hard Drive on an ISA Card) for the HDD <-- possibly Intel
1993 - 386 (upgraded from the 286) <-- possibly Intel
1994 - 486 (fastest CPU installed was an AMD AM486 DX4-120)
1998/1999 - AMD K6-2/300 (stopped working suddenly in 2009)
2006 - AMD Athlon 64 3200+ Socket 754
2008 - AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual-Core 4000+ AM2+
2012 - Intel Celeron B280 (ASUS X54C laptop)
2014-2016 - ARM processors (single core, quad core) Raspberry Pi Model B+, 2 B, and 3 B.
2015 - AMD FX-6300 3.5GHz AM3+

Discord: https://discord.gg/U5dJw7x
Systems from the Compaq Portable 1 to FX-8350
Twitch: https://twitch.tv/retropcuser

Reply 82 of 118, by Andy1979

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1996 - Intel Pentium 120
1997 - AMD K6 200
1998 - Intel Pentium II 333
2000 - AMD Duron 600
2002 - AMD Duron 1200
2003 - AMD Athlon XP 2500+
2006 - Intel Core2Duo E6600
2009 - Intel Core i5 750
2013 - Intel Core i5 3570K (still running great, see no reason to upgrade)

Interesting that my current CPU is now over 4yrs old, yet in my first 4yrs of PC ownership I got through 4 upgrades. Shows how far things have come. To be honest I'd still be using my 2009 i5 system if I hadn't needed to downsize to ITX.

On the laptop front my CoreDuo T2300E is still going strong after 10yrs (with a few RAM upgrades along the way)

My Retro systems:
1. Pentium 200, 64mb EDO RAM, Matrox Millennium 2mb, 3DFX Voodoo 4mb, DOS6.22 / Win95 / Win98SE
2. Compaq Armada M700 laptop, PIII-450, Win98SE
3. Core2Duo E6600, ATI Radeon 4850, Win XP

Reply 83 of 118, by psychz

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To be honest I'd still be using my 2009 i5 system if I hadn't needed to downsize to ITX.

What is interesting to see, is that generally the perceivable speed difference between CPUs released year-by-year, or sometimes even in the same year, were tremendous in the nineties, which isn't the case nowadays, since the progress isn't as much as it was back then, our basic needs are covered by large even with the slowest of modern processors, and today, parts of their main focus points are low power consumption and integration, thus practically making all platforms after Pentium 4 still perfectly usable. I've recently seen lots of people happily working on Core 2 Duo machines. Socket 775 lives 🤣 Hell, even P4s would be usable if not for hi-res video decoding and content-rich website rendering (lots of javascript!!!)

Stojke wrote:

Its not like components found in trash after 20 years in rain dont still work flawlessly.

:: chemical reaction :: athens in love || reality is absent || spectrality || meteoron || the lie you believe

Reply 84 of 118, by kanecvr

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aop wrote:
I didn't have that good experience with K6-2. The difference between it and fast Pentium II or Celeron rigs was ridiculous. Late […]
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kanecvr wrote:

*snip*

I didn't have that good experience with K6-2. The difference between it and fast Pentium II or Celeron rigs was ridiculous. Later that year some friends updated to AMD Duron CPUs and the difference was absolutely massive (I'd estimate they had atleast 3 times as much fps in Counter-Strike with the same video card). Deus Ex demo was one of the games my K6-2 450 MHz, 128MB RAM, Voodoo 3 2000 AGP and 13GB HDD setup really struggled back in the day. I'd be surprised if I had anything over 10 fps at 640*480.

In fact I have been playing around with my retro PC lately and the K6-2 is dog slow unless the games are specifically optimized for it. Even older stuff like Carmageddon II could get choppy. I slapped in a K6-III+ and that's a totally different beast (for example Carmageddon II is much smoother on it than on a similarly clocked K6-2) though it struggles with many games released in 2000 too.

Had I gotten a Celeron 300A or 333 and a decent motherboard instead of the K6-2 I bet I'd have been much happier in the long run.

My numbers prove otherwise: 500MHz P II v.s. 500MHz P III v.s. 550MHz K6-III+ benchmarks!

The difference in performance between a PII and K6-II/III CPU is negligible, and can be attributed entirely to the super socket 7 platform, where performance will differ massively depending on what motherboard and chipset is used. I believe your K6 was slow because it was either poorly configured or it used a cheap motherboard or a non super 7 motherboard (VIA MVP3/MVP4 or ALi Aladdin V). Stuff like running a 400Mhz K6-II at 66x6 instead of 100x4 severely impacts performance of the system, as well as using FPM / EDO ram and slow drives taken over from 486 machines during an upgrade, and from my experience back in the day is what gave the K6-II a bad rep. That and the original K6 witch was horrendous.

On the flip side, I've seen slot 1 machines running on cheap chinese mainboards with 72 pin simms or combo 72 pin / sdram but the machine had SIMM memory in it, and it was FPM at that - those things sucked. In my country some (very few) people would spend 700$ on a pentium II CPU and expend their budget, being forced to buy cheap mainboards and even use ram off their old machines - causing the 700$ CPU to perform like 200$ P55C. Not all did this tough. At least half would buy a decent board to go with the CPU, but frankly the majority of slot 1 rigs were pre built OEM stuff from IBM, compaq or HP.

Reply 86 of 118, by NamelessPlayer

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Computers I've built with contemporary parts:

2007 - Intel Core 2 Quad Q6600, G0 stepping. Still going strong in the family computer jacked up to 3.0 GHz, though pushing it to 3.6 GHz results in some kinda instability I never figured out. It's still surprisingly good enough for a lot of modern PC games if paired with 8 GB of DDR2 and a GTX 760.
2013 - Intel Core i7-4770K. 4.6 GHz on water, still my most powerful CPU by far, and it cost me a whopping $200 at Micro Center. Best pre-Black Friday sale ever!

...yeah, it's a short list. I was only 17 in late 2007, after all, and gaming-grade computers are not cheap things. Now, if I was to factor in family-built-or-owned systems?

1999/2000 - AMD K6-2 350.

I played a lot of DOS/Win9x era games on that thing, though I have to seriously question why my father used a PC-Chips M598 mobo, AT case and PSU. Budget parts, I guess? Also, he never, ever bought a 3dfx card for some dumb reason, though he did pick up an ATI Xpert98 PCI at one point to make it not totally suck in the 3D department. It worked.

That system went to recycling save for a few choice parts many years ago, however. I don't miss it when I have better options now, ranging from DOSBox/PCem to my P4EE 98SE/XP rig (which didn't make the list because I built it well after the components were decades old).

2002 - AMD Athlon XP 1800+.

It was part of some crappy Compaq desktop my parents bought after a move. 512 MB of DDR-266, and later, an ATI Radeon 9600 XT - its only upgrade when in mainline service. It was a huge leap over the K6-2, no question, but having to put up with increasingly dreadful performance in Far Cry/Doom 3/Half-Life 2, Battlefield 2, F.E.A.R., TES IV: Oblivion and eventually Crysis made me cave in and build the Q6600 box.

I have not seen that big a leap in performance ever since, regardless of what people say about Nehalem/Westmere and Sandy Bridge being a good jump over Kentsfield to warrant retiring Core 2 on the spot. I wasn't that rich. And since the new system was mine, I didn't have pesky parents telling me what I could and couldn't do on it!

Part of me does wish that I held out a few more years until Skylake (since DDR4 seems to make a considerable improvement for CPU-limited scenarios), but the one-two punch of PlanetSide 2 and DCS World made for a brutal wake-up call about how CPU-limited games can actually be. When I saw a considerable increase in framerate between both CPUs and associated RAM while keeping a GTX 480 across both, it was clearly time to upgrade.

I actually don't know what I'll move on to next. i9 and Threadripper are enticing, but way too expensive when I'm just looking for 6 to 8 cores with ludicrous single-threaded performance.

The problem I find now is that I don't have enough PCIe lanes to maintain my X-Fi Titanium HD, USB 3.0/3.1/Thunderbolt 3.0 host controller cards, and a video capture card/framegrabber all at once when the higher-end hardware requires PCIe x4 slots. Then you tack on a few NVMe SSDs down the road, which take another four PCIe lanes apiece, and 16 PCIe lanes + 4 on the chipset is not going to cut it. Coffee Lake and Ryzen 7 aren't pushing far enough in that respect, so HEDT it is. Maybe the time will be right once they push PCIe 4.0 out to market.

Reply 87 of 118, by appiah4

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1987--MOS Technology 6502 (Atari 800 XL)
1989--Intel 8086 (IBM PC Compatible clone)
1990--Motorola 68000 (Amiga 500)
1993--Intel 80486 DX-33
1995--Intel 80486 DX4-100
1998--Intel Pentium II 300
2000--Intel Pentium III 866
2002--AMD AthlonXP 1800+
2002--AMD AthlonXP 2000+ (I fried the former chip while trying to unlock its multiplier)
2003--AMD AthlonXP 2500+
2006--AMD Athlon64 X2 3600+ (Skipped the whole Athlon64 Socket 754/939 generations as I was on military duty)
2008--AMD Athlon X2 7450
2009--AMD Phenom X3 8450
2010--AMD Athlon II 640
2014--AMD FX-6100
2016--AMD FX-8300
2018--AMD Ryzen 7 1700 (One can dream..)

Some clockspeeds and dates are a little hazy in my mind, but regardless..

Last edited by appiah4 on 2017-11-09, 06:20. Edited 1 time in total.

Retronautics: A digital gallery of my retro computers, hardware and projects.

Reply 89 of 118, by Nvm1

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Well, just a modest list here:
1. Cyrix 486 fascache @ 40mhz - Parents first computer, I must have used it for more then 50% 😀
2. AMD 486DX2 @ 80mhz
3. Pentium 133mhz
4. AMD K6 - 200mhz
5. AMD K6-2 400mhz (I used this computer in my student room till atleast 2006 when some caps blew)
6. Celeron 433mhz
7. Pentium 4 - 1.8Ghz -s478 (I saved a lot for this pc with it's first flatscreen with it, still have the cpu and the flatscreen as second to a newer screen.)
8. Pentium 4 - 2.4Ghz
9. Pentium Dual D930
10. Core 2 Quad Q6600 (in the G0 stepping)
11. Core I7 3930K (current rig)

I have not mentioned notebook cpu's, that would have expended the list alot and most of them came with the machine 🤣

Reply 90 of 118, by m1919

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Pentium MMX - 233 MHz
Pentium II - 350 MHz
Pentium 4 - 2.4Ghz (Prescott, Socket 478)
Core 2 Duo T9400 (Asus M50VM-B1)
Core 2 Quad Q9450
Core i7-920
Core i7-5820k

Past the 5820k, I've been running used QS Xeons, but we'll see what comes in future.

Crimson Tide - EVGA 1000P2; ASUS Z10PE-D8 WS; 2x E5-2697 v3 14C 3.8 GHz on all cores (All core hack); 64GB Samsung DDR4-2133 ECC
EVGA 1080 Ti FTW3; EVGA 750 Ti SC; Sound Blaster Z

Reply 91 of 118, by alvaro84

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Z80@3.125MHz (1989) - I don't know the actual manufacturer, I'll take my Videoton TVC apart again one day then I'll know...

8088/10 (1993) - I still don't know though I saw it enough before I put this thing together, or, more precisely, it was put together in the shop. I wasn't brave enough to build my own when I was a highschool kid. It was backed up with an Intel 8087-10 but I gave it away with the board. I really regret it as I couldn't find any 8087 for my collection yet.

80286/10 (1994-ish) - I've never seen this one, this ceramic beauty was hidden below a heat sink. The board was pretty oldschool, it was large and didn't know type 47 HDD.

AMD 386SX/33 (1995-ish) - A whole new world of 386. I played Doom on it when I finally got 4MB of RAM. I have a similar board now (though it runs at 40MHz) and now I see how horrible it is. Felt better those days...

AMD 5x86-133@160 (perhaps late 1996...?) - Another huge step up. I was still behind with my hardware but was working on closing the gap. Could run Quake but any Pentium smoked this one.

AMD K6/266, quickly followed by K6-2/266 - First with an Acorp TX board, then a Lucky Star MVP3. I'm still not sure it was a good idea.

AMD K6-2/500@550 (1998 or 1999, I guess)

AMD Athlon XP 1700 (fried), 1600+, both Palomino.

AMD Athlon XP 2100+ Thoroughbred-B, could do 2300MHz+ on water.

Core 2 Duo E6420 (2007) - This was where I switched to Intel because after the P4 era they returned to make decent CPUs. At what I deemed a decent price back then.

Core 2 Duo E8400 (2015?) - From the scrap. A nice little upgrade for the Conroe. Wasn't really necessary but it was free. Still in use in another computer.

Core i3-2100 (2016/17) - Salvaged from garbage again, together with a motherboard.

Plus there's a 'permanent' 'kitchen computer' with an AMD A4-3400. It has no video card and is quite light on power but we rarely use it.

Shame on us, doomed from the start
May God have mercy on our dirty little hearts

Reply 92 of 118, by F2bnp

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kanecvr wrote:

This is a little off-topic, but you have been told before and even in the thread you mentioned that you were GPU limited by the Banshee, which is true. Replace the Banshee with a Voodoo3 and you'll see the Pentium 2 and 3 systems distancing themselves from the K6-III+.
3DMark99 is also not really indicative, it leverages 3DNow! and SSE to great extent, which is why the Pentium 2 is left behind, but this was certainly not what was happening at the time.
The Pentiums are ahead mostly because the P6 processors had a really fast FPU, where as the K6's was less powerful.

Integer performance is another matter and the K6-III+ (and K6 line in general) is more than competitive here.

Reply 93 of 118, by aop

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kanecvr wrote:
- Aida64 2.5 - Speedsys 4.78 - 3DMark 99 - GL_Quake - Quake 2 3.20 - 3dfx MiniGL v1.46 […]
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- Aida64 2.5
- Speedsys 4.78
- 3DMark 99
- GL_Quake
- Quake 2 3.20
- 3dfx MiniGL v1.46

Which one of those is 00's game I talked about?

Reply 94 of 118, by Andy1979

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psychz wrote:

What is interesting to see, is that generally the perceivable speed difference between CPUs released year-by-year, or sometimes even in the same year, were tremendous in the nineties, which isn't the case nowadays, since the progress isn't as much as it was back then, our basic needs are covered by large even with the slowest of modern processors, and today, parts of their main focus points are low power consumption and integration, thus practically making all platforms after Pentium 4 still perfectly usable.

Agreed - although it's interesting to see that the current 8th gen i5s are probably an awful lot faster than mine full throttle, I'm just not sure I would notice. Did make full use of it when it was new though, encoding all of my blu-rays to MP4 which took ages. In terms of productivity applications, I'm astounded how well a P133 still runs Office 97 (albeit without Norton Antivirus in the background these days!) so once you can do all that plus MP3 playback, digital photography, HTML5 and HD video, any extra power is surplus for most people, which I guess is why consumer PC sales keep declining. VR/AR looks like being the next big leap, if it catches on.

It's similar with GPUs - when I needed to replace the graphics card in this system I went with an Nvidia GT1030 which plays all my games faster than the card I had before, while drawing about half the power.

The only system I own which feels genuinely slow is an Atom-based Windows tablet which only has 1gb of RAM, and that was mostly fine until the latest Windows 10 update.

My Retro systems:
1. Pentium 200, 64mb EDO RAM, Matrox Millennium 2mb, 3DFX Voodoo 4mb, DOS6.22 / Win95 / Win98SE
2. Compaq Armada M700 laptop, PIII-450, Win98SE
3. Core2Duo E6600, ATI Radeon 4850, Win XP

Reply 95 of 118, by appiah4

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My experience is that the K6-II is a better CPU than the MMX, and the later K6-2 models and K6-III are faster than the Pentium II overall, but the Pentium III really basically stomps it. But then, there is Athlon which also stomps the Pentium III so..

Retronautics: A digital gallery of my retro computers, hardware and projects.

Reply 96 of 118, by torindkflt

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For my response, I'm going to consider "new" as being no more than approximately one year after release of the CPU (According to Google) when it came into my possession...although I will leave a little margin of error since obviously I cannot remember exact purchase/build dates from way back yonder. This list will include family computers that everyone in the household was able to use including myself, as well as systems I personally have owned.

AMD 486DX4-100 - Generic mail-order build. My family's first "modern" (i.e. from the 90s) computer we got in late summer of 1995. Prior to this we had been still using a stock Apple II Plus.😵 No longer have this exact system, but I have recently recreated it.

AMD K6-2 350MHz "Chomper" - HP Pavilion 4530. This replaced the 486 mentioned above sometime in 1999. No longer have it.

AMD Duron 1GHz "Morgan" - Custom build. This was the first computer I ever built myself, in mid 2002. I think I have the processor somewhere, but if I do then it's lost in storage.

AMD Athlon 64 3500+ - Custom build. Second computer I ever built, sometime in 2005. Replaced the one above. Still have the processor and motherboard but they are no longer together.

Intel Pentium T2060 - Lenovo 3000 C200. First laptop I ever bought on my own sometime in 2007. No longer have this.

Intel Atom N270 - Acer Aspire One 150. My first netbook, bought it with my employee discount from work in late 2009. Still have it but don't use it anymore.

Intel Core i5-520M - Lenovo ThinkPad L512. Replaced the C200 in 2010 or so. It died a horrible unexpected death, so I no longer have this.

Intel Core i3-2120 - Lenovo H310. Got it in late 2011 to use as a home office computer. I no longer have this exact system, but I am typing this post on a 100% identical machine at work. 🤣

Intel Core i7-3632QM - Lenovo IdeaPad P400. Replaced the ThinkPad in 2013. Still my daily driver. 😁

Reply 97 of 118, by forteller

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I keep list of my CPUs in Excel so I can exactly say what I had when. It only covers my daily drivers so I will put them as-is. Not all of them were new when I had them (well, more often than not I had outdated hw), but as those were systems I used every day, I think it's ok to put them all. Here we go:
1992 - 386DX40 - First PC in my family
2000 - Celeron 500 - first "modern" PC
2002 - Pentium 1.6 (not-A / Willamete) - just an upgrade of previous PC. Just swapped mobo+cpu
2004 - Athlon XP 2600+ Barton - my very first own PC
2005 - Duron 750 - duh-oh! I fried my still fast enough AXP when I was tinkering with my PC and had to drop something into its place. That was painful experience...
2006 - Sempron 2500+ s754 Palermo - that thing overclocked like crazy! From 1400MHz to about 2500MHz!
2007.07 - Athlon 64 3000+ s754 Venice - basically free upgrade as I traded my Sempron for the same money. This gained me 100MHz more and bigger L2 cache which were nice.
2007.08 - Athlon 64 3000+ AM2 Orleans - time for new platform. With Abit KN9 and very nice set of 2x1GB DDR2 memory, once again I had very big gains hitting almost 3000MHz stable.
2007.12 - Athlon X2 5200+ AM2 Windsor - oh boy, what a busy year! The whole platform changing thing was about getting a good deal for one of these processors. People went crazy about E2140/E2160 and lowest C2D back then, but my X2 overclocked like hell and was cheaper. Running @ 3,45GHz stable with air cooling it was comparable even with overclocked Pentiums and Core 2 Duos. I even managed to break some world records in super pi and highest clock on hwbot with this. Still with air cooling! One of best processors I ever had.
2008.04 - Pentium M 1,6GHz Banias - my journey with notebooks starts here. I sold my X2 and bought old HP Compaq nc6000.
2008.05 - Pentium M 735 - I quickly found a way to upgrade even this old notebook
2008.09 - Pentium 4 506 - ...and quickly started to regret selling desktop computer. Prescott was very outdated back then and nowhere near previous AMD CPU
2008.12 - Core 2 Duo E7200 - my very first Core 2 Duo. Oh boy that thing was cheap and fast, although it was the worst overclocking Penryn I ever saw. It was good for only 3,73GHz stable, but it was enough for some time
2010.07 - Core 2 Quad Q6600 - I only had this CPU for one month. Had some serious stability issues for some reason so I sold my desktop once again, and once again went with Pentium M...
2010.07 - Pentium M 750 - hello again, old buddy 😀 This time I had HP Compaq nc4200 which was very compact. I found that I can modify CPU clock with ClockGen so I managed to overclock this notebook! It was stable until 2,4GHz which was quite a boost, but it didn't overcame the fact that it only had 1 core...
2011.08 - Core 2 Duo T7700 - next year, next notebook. HP Compaq 6910p this time.
2011.10 - Core 2 Duo T9300 - that was nice upgrade which gave me better performance and better battery life.
2012.01 - Core 2 Duo SP9400 - I found 6910p too bulky so I bought Dell Latitude E4300. One of the best notebooks I ever had. For its time it combined amazing performance (I had my first SSD and 8GB of RAM back then), battery life and styling with compact size
2013.02 - 2x Xeon E5345 - after three years of having laptop with docking station I started to miss desktop computer once again. Del Precision 490 was a mistake, so I quickly replaced it.
2013.06 - Core i5 3570k - for the first time I bought something that was fairly recent. Didn't had enough money to buy a proper GPU for some time, but I found that integrated HD4000 after overclocking (along with CPU and RAM) was quite capable. I even managed to finish then-new Tomb Raider on medium details and native resolution of my monitor (1680x1050). I was shocked 😀
2014.01 - Core i7 3770k - got quite lucky and upgraded it very cheap. Apart from that it actually ran cooler than 3570k (this TIM...) and overclocked a little better.
2017.08 - Core i7-7800X - it looks like I settled for quite some time with my previous CPU. I would have still used it if only I didn't had second motherboard failure. s1155 boards are very expensive these days so I decided to buy new platform. I hope that it will be enough for few years...

That was a bumpy road I had! 😁

2017: 7800X@4,6G / X299 / 32GB / GTX 1080 / SM961 256GB+2x256GB RAID0 / G710+ / G402 / U2713H
2003: P4 2,8C@3,4G / IS7 / 2GB / AIW9700Pro / 160GB+2x40GB RAID0 / SK-8000 / IMO 1.1A / G200
2000: K6-3+@600M / 591P / 384MB / Voodoo3+1 / GUS+AWE32 / 40GB

Reply 98 of 118, by kanecvr

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F2bnp wrote:
This is a little off-topic, but you have been told before and even in the thread you mentioned that you were GPU limited by the […]
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kanecvr wrote:

This is a little off-topic, but you have been told before and even in the thread you mentioned that you were GPU limited by the Banshee, which is true. Replace the Banshee with a Voodoo3 and you'll see the Pentium 2 and 3 systems distancing themselves from the K6-III+.
3DMark99 is also not really indicative, it leverages 3DNow! and SSE to great extent, which is why the Pentium 2 is left behind, but this was certainly not what was happening at the time.
The Pentiums are ahead mostly because the P6 processors had a really fast FPU, where as the K6's was less powerful.

Integer performance is another matter and the K6-III+ (and K6 line in general) is more than competitive here.

FPU performance was measured with aida64 (pure number crunching via FPU). In these tests, it's either slightly slower or slightly faster then the intel chips depending on what type of test was running (FPU Julia, Mandell, ETC). I presume you're basing the "k6-2 fpu is slower then a pentium" argument on period correct articles witch used Quake or GL_Quake as a test bench - and it is well known that Quake is heavily optimized for the Pentium architecture. In fact both DOS Quake and GL_Quake are playable on a socket 4 66MHz pentium - it's that well optimized. There are reviews from that time (of the pentium II) witch compare the 233MHz P2 with the 233MHz pentium MMX - and in quake, the PII looses. As an interesting side-note, while playable on the 66MHz socket 4 pentium, Dos Quake is unplayable on the 63MHz POD5V, and barely playable on the 83MHz POD5V, even tough the later is clocked higher then the original pentium - this shows how important the platform is for performance, and it entertains my theory that the K6's biggest handicap is the socket 7 platform.

As for the video card, I re-ran the tests with a voodoo 3, and included a Celeron in the mix - the results are mostly the same. When no enhancements are used (SSE, 3DNOW!) the K6-III is slightly faster in some tests then the P2, but slower then the P3 (SSE is faster then 3DNOW?). The Celeron is also faster then the P2 (in some tests) due to it's 128kb on-die L2 cache, and in some benchmarks even faster then the PIII. I'll post results on a different thread this weekend.

On the other hand, when using an nVidia card, things change. The PII is up to 30% faster then a similarly clocked K6-3 when using a Riva TNT2, and ~10-15% slower then the PIII, depending on what video card drivers you use. Please take the numbers with a grain of salt, they are off the top of my head. I'll post videos and exact numbers this weekend.

Reply 99 of 118, by Katmai500

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I'm counting "new" as the fastest CPU in my possession that was used in my main computer (desktop or laptop) for at least half a year. For reference I was 10 years old in 1998. Any computers not noted as a gift I bought new or built myself.

Desktops:
1998: Pentium 90 MHz (My first computer and a gift from my grandfather) Zeos Full AT Tower with a Socket 5 adapter on a Socket 4 motherboard and a SB AWE32 CT2760
1999: Pentium III 500 MHz, Gateway Essential 500 (A Christmas gift and my first new computer. The basis for my user name.)
2002: Pentium III 850 Mhz *upgrade the 500 above
2002: Pentium 4 2.4B GHz, Dell Dimension 4550
2004: Pentium 4 3.06 GHz *upgraded the 2.4 above
2007: Core 2 Quad Q6700 2.66 GHz, Custom built myself
2011: Core i7 2600K 3.4 GHz (OC to 4.5 GHz), Custom built myself and still using it today

Laptops:
2000: Pentium 133 MHz, Dell Latitude LM (bought it from a friend for $40)
2002: K6-2 350 / *K6-2 500 / *K6-III-P 450 MHz, Compaq Presario 1670 (hand me down from my mom). *I upgraded the CPU twice in 2002.
2003: Athlon XP-M 2400+, Compaq Presario 2100
2003: Mobile Pentium 4 3.06 GHz, Dell Inspiron 5150
2007: Core 2 Duo T5600 1.83 GHz, Dell Inspiron E1505
2009: Core 2 Duo T9300 2.5 GHz, Dell XPS m1530
2013: Core i5 3230M 2.6 GHz, Dell XPS 15 L521x

I still have all of these computers except the Presario 2100 and Inspiron 5150. 🤣