VOGONS


Reply 80 of 121, by Horun

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Predator99 wrote on 2020-04-29, 10:50:

- nobody will remove a sticker to see what chip is under?

Oh I will ! On your board you have two stickers, had a board similar and peeled one of the stickers off to check the chipset and then put sticker back on. Sure was a bit rough on the one corner that I used to peel it up but did not care. Was very important to figure out the main chipset since there was no Stasons/TH99/etc that had the board. What is more important than a sticker on a chipset (to me) is the sticker on the BIOS or the board itself. Chipset stickers mean nothing on old boards. Ever see what Amptron did on many of their boards ?

HanJammer wrote on 2020-04-30, 00:38:

Oh great... I should have known better and use the programmer instead of relying on the NSSI to do the job... damn it 😒

NISSI has saved the split BIOS on a 286 for me properly but that could have just been by luck. Have not tried any other split bios boards with it..

Hate posting a reply and have to edit it because it made no sense 😁 First computer was an IBM 3270 workstation with CGA monitor. 🤣 Second computer a 286 12Mhz with real IDE drive ! After that came 386, 486, Pentium, P.Pro and everything after....

Reply 82 of 121, by Deunan

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Don't use NSSI to dump the BIOS, it will create a bad image if the F000 shadow is enabled - as some BIOSes self-modify while in RAM and the checksum byte won't match.
Best to use external programmer or at least disable all ROM shadows before running NSSI, maybe that will fix it.

I dumped a couple of mobos, had problems each time. Except the 286, I never tried NSSI dump on that one so maybe an older BIOS will be fine, but it's best to always make sure the checksum is OK. Also, I had some other issues with NSSI and 64k long BIOS images (on VGA cards or mobos? can't remember) - the dumped image seemed to be 1 byte short.

Reply 83 of 121, by HanJammer

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Yes, I always use the external programmer, but this time I couldn't do that...

For sale (2019.12.01 - new items!!!): 8088, 286 stuff | 386, 486 stuff | Socket 5-8 stuff | Old HDDs and 5.25" FDDs

Reply 84 of 121, by Horun

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HanJammer wrote on 2020-05-02, 23:33:
#46 […]
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#46

Manufacturer/Identifier: Wearnes CL286-12/16S (CL286-12S and CL286-16S)
Chipset: Texas Instruments TACT822 / Micrel MIC921
BIOS/Version: AMI 080190
Rom Type : NMC27C256Q x 2

Nice ! I did not know Wearnes also marketed motherboards ! Had a CDROM back in early 90's that was a Wearnes. Looks like 1Mb of ram but not parity and SIMM sockets ! I want one !!!

Hate posting a reply and have to edit it because it made no sense 😁 First computer was an IBM 3270 workstation with CGA monitor. 🤣 Second computer a 286 12Mhz with real IDE drive ! After that came 386, 486, Pentium, P.Pro and everything after....

Reply 85 of 121, by HanJammer

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Horun wrote on 2020-05-02, 23:43:
HanJammer wrote on 2020-05-02, 23:33:
#46 […]
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#46

Manufacturer/Identifier: Wearnes CL286-12/16S (CL286-12S and CL286-16S)
Chipset: Texas Instruments TACT822 / Micrel MIC921
BIOS/Version: AMI 080190
Rom Type : NMC27C256Q x 2

Nice ! I did not know Wearnes also marketed motherboards ! Had a CDROM back in early 90's that was a Wearnes. Looks like 1Mb of ram but not parity and SIMM sockets ! I want one !!!

Yeah... I have a CD-ROM too. It seems like an industrial motherboard (string in the ROM may confirm that). Too bad it doesn't work (for now).

For sale (2019.12.01 - new items!!!): 8088, 286 stuff | 386, 486 stuff | Socket 5-8 stuff | Old HDDs and 5.25" FDDs

Reply 86 of 121, by Horun

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HanJammer wrote on 2020-05-02, 23:55:

Yeah... I have a CD-ROM too. It seems like an industrial motherboard (string in the ROM may confirm that). Too bad it doesn't work (for now).

I do see a bit of corrosion near the battery, specially jp17 and near the KB controller. hope you get it working !

Hate posting a reply and have to edit it because it made no sense 😁 First computer was an IBM 3270 workstation with CGA monitor. 🤣 Second computer a 286 12Mhz with real IDE drive ! After that came 386, 486, Pentium, P.Pro and everything after....

Reply 87 of 121, by kikendo

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Sorry I am a noob, but I want to contribute my 386's BIOS. How do I find out which chips I need to put in chipset?
Also if I understood correctly, I can use NSSI to dump the BIOS, correct? I don't have a ROM reader.

Reply 88 of 121, by Horun

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kikendo wrote on 2020-06-11, 14:54:

Sorry I am a noob, but I want to contribute my 386's BIOS. How do I find out which chips I need to put in chipset?
Also if I understood correctly, I can use NSSI to dump the BIOS, correct? I don't have a ROM reader.

" which chips I need to put in chipset?" -> I do not understand.
To use NSSI you need to have the board bootable to a DOS bootable floppy disk with NSSI on it and then save the bios to to floppy.

Hate posting a reply and have to edit it because it made no sense 😁 First computer was an IBM 3270 workstation with CGA monitor. 🤣 Second computer a 286 12Mhz with real IDE drive ! After that came 386, 486, Pentium, P.Pro and everything after....

Reply 89 of 121, by Aerion

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@Predator99:

#20 386-4N-D04A PCB V1.0 additional information:

BIOS Version: UMC 4913 386 IVN 1.0 1993.12.22
BIOS-ID: 40-0102-428003-00101111-080893-UMC491F-F

The JP8 is not documented anywhere, does anyone have any information about it?

Reply 90 of 121, by kalohimal

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Horun wrote on 2020-06-13, 00:00:
kikendo wrote on 2020-06-11, 14:54:

Sorry I am a noob, but I want to contribute my 386's BIOS. How do I find out which chips I need to put in chipset?
Also if I understood correctly, I can use NSSI to dump the BIOS, correct? I don't have a ROM reader.

" which chips I need to put in chipset?" -> I do not understand.

I think he meant what info he should fill in for the chipset and/or how to identify the chipset on the motherboard.

Slow down your CPU with CPUSPD for DOS retro gaming.

Reply 91 of 121, by Predator99

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Aerion wrote on 2020-08-11, 06:14:
@Predator99: […]
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@Predator99:

#20 386-4N-D04A PCB V1.0 additional information:

BIOS Version: UMC 4913 386 IVN 1.0 1993.12.22
BIOS-ID: 40-0102-428003-00101111-080893-UMC491F-F

The JP8 is not documented anywhere, does anyone have any information about it?

Added, thanks. I dont have further Infos.

Reply 92 of 121, by Deksor

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I identified this board

Predator99 wrote on 2020-08-12, 08:25:
#67 Manufacturer/Identifier: Chipset: BIOS/Version: BIOS-ID: […]
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#67
Manufacturer/Identifier:
Chipset:
BIOS/Version:
BIOS-ID:

386-SIS-Z403736.jpg
386-SIS-Z403736.rar

It's made by PLATO TECHNOLOGY CO., LTD.
And here's the jumper configuration https://www.arvutimuuseum.ee/th99/m/U-Z/30210.htm

Trying to identify old hardware ? Visit Ultimate Hardware 2019

Reply 93 of 121, by Predator99

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Deksor wrote on 2020-08-12, 08:52:
I identified this board […]
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I identified this board

Predator99 wrote on 2020-08-12, 08:25:
#67 Manufacturer/Identifier: Chipset: BIOS/Version: BIOS-ID: […]
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#67
Manufacturer/Identifier:
Chipset:
BIOS/Version:
BIOS-ID:

386-SIS-Z403736.jpg
386-SIS-Z403736.rar

It's made by PLATO TECHNOLOGY CO., LTD.
And here's the jumper configuration https://www.arvutimuuseum.ee/th99/m/U-Z/30210.htm

Added, thanks. Seems your project is working well 😉

Reply 96 of 121, by Aerion

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Predator99 wrote on 2020-08-12, 14:09:

OK also added. This board looks like new. Unfortunately the leaking battery has destroyed many traces, its not working at all at the moment, but its nice and I will keep it.

That's really unfortunate - those crappy NiCd batteries...

Reply 98 of 121, by Horun

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Deksor wrote on 2020-08-25, 21:55:

286 #49, #50 and #56 (Octek FOX M 286) share the exact same BIOS. They all have the same SHA256 hash.

That is interesting since #49 has bios string D286-6069-040990-K8 and #50 ends 040990-KD in the pictures. I just checked too and both H and L do match from both of those, wonder why one has a slightly diff string if they match. Did not check Predator99 Fox M bios. Guess I should fire up my Fox M 286 and see if it has a different string.....

Hate posting a reply and have to edit it because it made no sense 😁 First computer was an IBM 3270 workstation with CGA monitor. 🤣 Second computer a 286 12Mhz with real IDE drive ! After that came 386, 486, Pentium, P.Pro and everything after....

Reply 99 of 121, by HanJammer

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Horun wrote on 2020-08-25, 22:27:
Deksor wrote on 2020-08-25, 21:55:

286 #49, #50 and #56 (Octek FOX M 286) share the exact same BIOS. They all have the same SHA256 hash.

That is interesting since #49 has bios string D286-6069-040990-K8 and #50 ends 040990-KD in the pictures. I just checked too and both H and L do match from both of those, wonder why one has a slightly diff string if they match. Did not check Predator99 Fox M bios. Guess I should fire up my Fox M 286 and see if it has a different string.....

It's possible I've overwritten the bin-s when preparing the zip files, those were two different BIOS versions, that's why uploaded both... unfortunatelly I no longer have both motherboards and files on my HDD are identical indeed 😒

For sale (2019.12.01 - new items!!!): 8088, 286 stuff | 386, 486 stuff | Socket 5-8 stuff | Old HDDs and 5.25" FDDs