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First post, by candle_86

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Question I want to convert my HP K7M bios which is a PhoenixBios to the original ASUS bios but the original is AMI, is this possible, I found some references of using the ASUS bios for better support, but how would I do this

Phenom II X4 840T @ 4ghz - ASUS M3N72D-SLI - GTX 560 Ti- 4GB DDR2 1066 - 1TB HDD - Windows XP
Pentium 4 3.4C - MSI 865PE NEO2 - x850 XT PE - 2GB DDR 400 - 500GB HDD - Windows XP
Duron 1600 - ASUS A7N8X - 512MB DDR 266 - Radeon 8500 LE

Reply 1 of 6, by Moogle!

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Whatever method you use to do this, make sure they are compatible. Some BIOSes are for subtly different variations of what is otherwise the same hardware. I got bit by this not too long ago with a Tyan Tomcat. Had an award, changed to the AMI, now the board will not use the hard disk or floppy.

Reply 2 of 6, by dionb

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Indeed, if the BIOS is 100% compatible this can work. I have an MSI MS-6168 that will accept both retail AMI and Packard Bell OEM Award BIOS.

Note that you can't do this with normal flash tools on the board itself. Uniflash will let you flash it, but it needs to work on your board and Asus does strange stuff with its BIOS flash circuitry so it usually does not. You'll need an EEPROM flasher or another board that Uniflash does like to hotflash.

Advantage to both methods : you can use them for recovery if things don't work as desired

Reply 3 of 6, by jesolo

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I agree with dionb.

If you want to try this out, buy an EEPROM replacement chip (normally the 27C512 type) and flash the other BIOS onto that chip with an EEPROM burner (or find someone near you that has one and can do it for you).
You then just remove the original E(E)PROM chip and substitute it with the one you flashed.
If things go sideways, then you at least have your original BIOS chip.
You can also make a backup copy of your original BIOS chip (before even removing it) using Navrátil System Information (NSSI) 0.60.

Reply 4 of 6, by candle_86

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Well then it looks like its time to buy a programmer 🤣

Phenom II X4 840T @ 4ghz - ASUS M3N72D-SLI - GTX 560 Ti- 4GB DDR2 1066 - 1TB HDD - Windows XP
Pentium 4 3.4C - MSI 865PE NEO2 - x850 XT PE - 2GB DDR 400 - 500GB HDD - Windows XP
Duron 1600 - ASUS A7N8X - 512MB DDR 266 - Radeon 8500 LE

Reply 5 of 6, by zyga64

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jesolo wrote:

If you want to try this out, buy an EEPROM replacement chip (normally the 27C512 type) and flash the other BIOS onto that chip with an EEPROM burner (or find someone near you that has one and can do it for you).

27C512 is only 64kB large. It is better suited for GFX cards bios.
For motherboard BIOS more common are 128kB or 256kB ones.

1) VLSI SCAMP /286@20 /4MB /TVGA9000C /CMI8330
2) i420EX /486DX33 /16MB /Trio64V+ /AZT2316
3) i430HX /P233MMX /64MB /VirgeDX+3DFX /YMF701
4) i440BX /P II 400 /256MB /FX5500/AWE64
5) i865G /E5800 /2GB /Ti4200 /YMF724

Reply 6 of 6, by jesolo

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zyga64 wrote:
jesolo wrote:

If you want to try this out, buy an EEPROM replacement chip (normally the 27C512 type) and flash the other BIOS onto that chip with an EEPROM burner (or find someone near you that has one and can do it for you).

27C512 is only 64kB large. It is better suited for GFX cards bios.
For motherboard BIOS more common are 128kB or 256kB ones.

True, I didn't check what type of motherboard it was (it's an AMD Athlon based motherboard).
64 KB BIOS file sizes were very common on later 386 & practically all 486 motherboards.

In this case, the BIOS of this motherboard (at least, on Asus' website) is 256 KB, which means you require an EEPROM of the 27C020 type.
You can also use a larger one (like the 27C040 type) and just "concatenate" the BIOS image file using the DOS "Copy /b" command.