VOGONS


Reply 20 of 31, by dkarguth

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If you're talking about a DIP IC, this is not the most correct way to do it, but I normally use the thinnest micro screwdriver I have, and slip it in between the socket and the chip. The slight taper usually will release the chip. I wouldn't recommend doing this unless you have to, however, as it has the tendency to bend the pins on one side of the chip. Fortunately with a DIP IC, the pins are fairly easy to re-align as long as it isn't done too often. However, I would advise AGAINST doing this on anything with a PGA socket. Do you have a photo of the offending chip?

"And remember, this fix is only temporary, unless it works." -Red Green

Reply 21 of 31, by Cyrix200+

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dkarguth wrote:

If you're talking about a DIP IC, this is not the most correct way to do it, but I normally use the thinnest micro screwdriver I have, and slip it in between the socket and the chip. The slight taper usually will release the chip. I wouldn't recommend doing this unless you have to, however, as it has the tendency to bend the pins on one side of the chip. Fortunately with a DIP IC, the pins are fairly easy to re-align as long as it isn't done too often. However, I would advise AGAINST doing this on anything with a PGA socket. Do you have a photo of the offending chip?

Maybe an extracter like this one?

U-Type-Flat-IC-Chip-Protection-Pliers-ROM-Circuit-Board-Extractor-Removal-Puller-Pull-up-Machine.jpg

1982 to 2001

Reply 22 of 31, by dkarguth

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I usually use one of those, but there is the occasional obnoxious one that has been stuffed right up against another component so you can only access one end of it. That's where the SuperJank Inc.© screwdriver method comes into play.

"And remember, this fix is only temporary, unless it works." -Red Green

Reply 23 of 31, by Cyrix200+

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And to add to the list (links are just examples!):

Proper sized Phillips head screwdrivers (not PoziDriv!!! can't stress this enough, you can damage screws and screwdriver with the wrong combination)
Screw grabber tool: http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?ca … 6,41329&p=73970
Screwdriver magnetizer/demagnetizer: https://www.fabtolab.com/screwdriver-magnetizer-demagnetizer

Desoldering pump with iron: https://www.ebay.com/p/Velleman-VTDESOL3U-Vac … id=282282083629

1982 to 2001

Reply 24 of 31, by Baoran

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I think this thing has been very useful for me when finding corroded or bent pins, corroded sockets and corroded traces on motherboard. I have also used it when desoldering/soldering small stuff.

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Reply 25 of 31, by dicky96

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Cyrix200+ wrote:

I've had more than one of those heated desoldering pumps and I find them not too clever to use, and quite prone to damaging PCB pads when you get a recoil from the spring each time you hit the trigger

Something like this are far better https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Pro-Desoldering-St … bgc~e:rk:1:pf:0 but not as good as the pedal operated PACE desoldering stations I used back in the day

My preferred method for desoldering multi pin components is to add 60-40 lead tin solderto each pin to lower the melting temperature if the PCB uses lead free, then use desolder braid dipped in flux together with my soldering iron to remove as much solder as possible. Then use a hot air station (yes they will desolder through hole components!) if the part still wont fall out of the board easily.

Rich

Reply 26 of 31, by ph4nt0m

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Yep, a temperature controlled heat gun is much better than those desoldering pumps. Although if I replace a damaged memory or expansion slot, I break it into pieces and pull pins one by one with a soldering iron.

My Active Sales on CPU-World

Reply 27 of 31, by retardware

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Few of you have ever used desolderers used in the industry back then.
Hollow soldering iron, heavy like a 250W iron, big mass to store the heat, and strong recoilless vacuum derived from the factory's pressurized air.
Putting the hollow desoldering iron over the pin, the whole leaded tin was liquid in an instance, pressing the button, *wup*, next pin.
That was fun! Board and IC were clean as new afterwards.

Heat guns are really like a crowbar for emergencies.
I use them very very rarely. Last time it was a few of giant stinking, probably PCB containing caps in a 1974 Tektronix oscilloscope.
That was a drama! Noxious gases 😵
Thus I add onte thing to the list:
-Good ventilation

And when you get the parts, they are usually quite dirty, right?
So I add more:
- Brushes of various forms and sizes (not plastics)
- Good vacuum cleaner, with various tips
(should be antistatic)
- IPA
- washed rags, convenient for cleaning

Various things:
- Mirror

Reply 28 of 31, by Jonas-fr

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Surprised to not see any mention of this awesome gadget : https://x86.fr/atx2at-smart-converter/

It'as an active ATX to AT converter with builtin overload protection. Very useful when you've got a mobo in an unknow condition and want to test it withotu damaging it nor your PSU. I'm not affiliated with this project but I use it all the freaking time !

Now another useful gadget that I didn't found is a pico PSU with -5V (I know some people here use a combination of picoPSU + passive ATX>AT converter with built-in -5V regulator but I'm not to found of that quality-wise). It would be really helpful to replace and old/bulky AT PSU to a new compact one (more effective and safe).

Reply 29 of 31, by Errius

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dkarguth wrote on 2019-01-30, 17:12:

If you're talking about a DIP IC, this is not the most correct way to do it, but I normally use the thinnest micro screwdriver I have, and slip it in between the socket and the chip. The slight taper usually will release the chip. I wouldn't recommend doing this unless you have to, however, as it has the tendency to bend the pins on one side of the chip. Fortunately with a DIP IC, the pins are fairly easy to re-align as long as it isn't done too often. However, I would advise AGAINST doing this on anything with a PGA socket. Do you have a photo of the offending chip?

Sorry, I only saw this now. The motherboard is from an IBM 5162 and the offending chips are the RAM chips next to the power connector.

http://www.supervinx.com/OnlineMuseum/IBM/516 … G_0980.JPG.html

“Your mission is to attack and destroy the Apple Computer manufacturing plant. You are allotted 35 bombs and 60 lasers."

Reply 30 of 31, by radiounix

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Did anyone mention band-aids and neosporin yet? And maybe some fine grit sandpaper so it doesn't happen again?

On a more serious note, having spare cards, memory, a spare power supply .etc is really helpful. Sometimes it's easier to just swap components, see if you can get it to work, then figure out why it wasn't working previously with the original part.

Reply 31 of 31, by RandomStranger

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I'd add PCMCIA SDHC and/or Compact Flash adapters. They are great to move data to laptops without USB. More reliable and offer more storage space than a floppy, it can be rewritten unlike a CD (also some old laptops don't have CD drives) and faster than using the parallel port.

sreq.png yt.png