VOGONS


First post, by user33331

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Hello
I found a 2001 IBM Deskstar 41.0gb 7200rpm.
- Model: IC35L040AVER07-0
- Made in Philippines.
- Mfg: June 2001.

Where IBM "Deathstars" made in Hungary only model:"DTLA-" and in year 2000 ?
Can I use this or will it have the same delamination problems as deathstars ?

Reply 1 of 10, by PC Hoarder Patrol

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Those drives were from the 75GXP series - yours is from the 60GXP series, so no but if you want you can get the IBM (period correct) drive fitness tester DFT32V320.exe and the associated PDF user guide from here

http://ftp.eq.uc.pt/software/pc/drivers_deq/ibm/harddrives/

Reply 2 of 10, by BushLin

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I had a GXP60 which died suddenly around the time of class action lawsuits against IBM over their Deathstars.
Could be coincidence but I would make the frequent backups I wish I had back then, if I were forced to use one.
For what it's worth, it passed the DFT shortly before its death. I'm still pissed off about it. Now I make backups.

I can pick out the distinctive high pitch click of a soon to be dead drive from across a room as a result.
There was one other (what seems now to be an obvious) warning, the partition table disappeared first and I thought I was being clever by recreating it and the data was still in tact... for a few days anyway.

Screw period correct; I wanted a faster system back then. I choose no dropped frames, super fast loading, fully compatible and quiet operation.

Reply 3 of 10, by AmiSapphire

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Yeah, it's the 75GXP (DTLA) series drives that had gotten the "Deathstar" moniker.

Ran into 2x 15GB drives of that series a few years ago, I think 2014, when I was still buying vintage motherboards. They were barely used when I got them (less than 5 POH) and still functioned as normal, and I immediately updated the firmware on those drives. They eventually were used in my server and compile box setups when the web server was completely upgraded (the compile box was an entirely new build) in 2017, mainly for my amusement. Over time, one drive had accumulated some bad sectors (3 as of this writing, along with 19772 POH), and one never did.

The kicker? The one without any bad sectors died, lmao. Nice squeaking sound emitted from the drive. That one was in the compile box build. No important data was lost, as what was deemed such would be moved to the Maxtor 250GB drive ASAP. The one in the main web server is still running to this day! But I redid the compile box build using my older IBM 34GXP drive, which has been in quite a few builds since obtaining it in 2004.

I suspect these particular drives were stored in a garage (or some other location) that wasn't climate controlled, however, which didn't help. I'm pondering replacing the boot HDDs in both builds with SSDs.

Some old DTLA SMART stats from the main web server in January 16, 2017.

Edit: They were both manufactured in Hungary in August 2000. There are also some Malaysian-manufactured DTLA units, and I heard those were much more reliable. They aren't common, however.
Edit 2: 34GXP not the non-existent 35GXP!

Last edited by AmiSapphire on 2019-05-27, 20:46. Edited 1 time in total.

Computer in my collection that had too much work done is... Compaq Armada 1573DM!

- Original DSTN panel replaced with an HPA panel (now gone)
- Left hinge repaired twice
- Front panel replaced thrice
- Replaced busted inverter
- Chassis replacement

Reply 4 of 10, by PC Hoarder Patrol

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^^Agreed...though the glass platter delamination was an issue with the 75GXP (and its subsequent class action). If the op does a quick search on the model number then your 60GXP concerns will show up in forum posts of the time, but this is a separate QC issue, and why I suggested running DFT.

Reply 5 of 10, by Matth79

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Oh, I remember those, if I recall, there were two issues that were fixed in firmware.
One was a corruption issue, and the other was to prevent the heads dwelling over the same track for long periods when idle

https://web.archive.org/web/20041116230353/ht … MIGR-44195.html
Don't know if the firmwares can still be found

Reply 7 of 10, by AmiSapphire

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Matth79 wrote:
Oh, I remember those, if I recall, there were two issues that were fixed in firmware. One was a corruption issue, and the other […]
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Oh, I remember those, if I recall, there were two issues that were fixed in firmware.
One was a corruption issue, and the other was to prevent the heads dwelling over the same track for long periods when idle

https://web.archive.org/web/20041116230353/ht … MIGR-44195.html
Don't know if the firmwares can still be found

I actually have the 75GXP firmware (I version) in my local storage server somewhere, should probably archive the 60GXP firmware...

IBM Identification Utility for IBM Deskstar Hard Drives
IBM Deskstar 60GXP Firmware Update
IBM Deskstar 75GXP Firmware Update (IAxAA version)
IBM Deskstar 75GXP Firmware Update (OAxAA version)

Surprised there exists working IBM pages, normally I would have to find them through FTP or some other site...

Computer in my collection that had too much work done is... Compaq Armada 1573DM!

- Original DSTN panel replaced with an HPA panel (now gone)
- Left hinge repaired twice
- Front panel replaced thrice
- Replaced busted inverter
- Chassis replacement

Reply 9 of 10, by Fusion

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Not really the best name for a HDD, in my opinion anyways. 🤣

WIP Retro Files
P3 800 | 512MB PC100| PCI V3 3000 16MB @ 195/195 | CT4780 SB Live! Value| WinME
P3 450 | 128MB PC100| AGP TNT2 Pro 32MB | CT4170 SB16 | MS-DOS 7.10
A64 2.4 | 2GB DDR1 | PCI-E Radeon X800XT @ 575/575 | Win2K

Reply 10 of 10, by retardware

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AmiSapphire wrote:

I suspect these particular drives were stored in a garage (or some other location) that wasn't climate controlled

I do not remember the deathstars that hit me - it was Dxxx somewhat.
These were 9 and 18GB drives, all SCSI.
When I came home in cold winter 2006 or 2007, my home was not yet heated up, I wanted to check emails.
Turned on computer, worked fine.
Next morning, turned computer on, one drive doesn't respond.
Turned computer off to check cables.
Turned on again. Two drives didn't respond.
After next turn-on, third drive dead, too.

Yuck!