VOGONS


First post, by viper32cm

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I recently acquired a Windows ME-era HP Pavilion desktop from a family member. For the time it appears to be a decent system:

Solid feeling ATX case
Pentium III 1Ghz
GeForce 2MX 32MB
SBLive! 5.1
40GB 7200RPM HDD

Sounds great, and all of the caps look good. Except I already have a Win98SE system built around a Pentium III 1Ghz with 512MB RAM, a GeForce 4 Ti4200, 2 Voodoo 2 12MB, and a SBLive! Value. So there's nothing that this new computer actually adds to my collection. My first thought was to put a Tualatin in it and build an early-XP or Win2K system. However, the motherboard doesn't support Tualatin. I suppose I could just make this computer an early-XP or Win2K system without the Tualatin, but that seems wasteful, as I could just make my current PIII system dual boot if I really wanted a PIII-based XP or 2K computer.

So, with that, I'm a bit out of ideas. At a minimum, I could keep it for spare parts. Alternatively, I could strip and store those spares and use the case for a Win2K or WinXP build based on something much newer. Does anyone have any thoughts on what I could do?

Reply 1 of 12, by SirNickity

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I would go with option #last. Store the redundant parts as replacements in case your PIII packs up. Build a P4 in the new case, and maybe use the graphics, sound and HDD if you don't have alternatives (until you have alternatives?)

I never like to let hardware go. Sooner or later something comes up and I'm glad to have it. E.g.: I rescued an HP Vectra Pentium II from a pile going to recycling, and just sat on it for a year. Then I found out my nephew is getting interested in retro computers, so I took the whole thing apart, cleaned it thoroughly (looks almost new!), wrapped the components in separate boxes (partly because I'm a gremlin, also because I wanted him to get the opportunity to build it himself), and then we spent Christmas day putting it together. He just got Windows 98 loaded on it last night with some help via texts. 😀 You just never know.

Reply 2 of 12, by PCBONEZ

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If you don't have BU machine already I would acquire a hardware RAID card and at least 2 large drives to use with XP/W2k as an off-line machine to keep backups on.
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GRUMPY OLD FART - On Hiatus, sort'a
Mann-Made Global Warming. - We should be more concerned about the Intellectual Climate.
You can teach a man to fish and feed him for life, but if he can't handle sushi you must also teach him to cook.

Reply 3 of 12, by gdjacobs

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PCBONEZ wrote on 2019-12-30, 23:24:

If you don't have BU machine already I would acquire a hardware RAID card and at least 2 large drives to use with XP/W2k as an off-line machine to keep backups on.
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These days, I recommend looking into ZFS on a more beefy build -- hold the RAID card. Hardware RAID stores data on the drives in a proprietary format. Software RAID is compatible with any drive interface, so recovery is much simpler. ZFS does require more RAM, but it's more effective at protecting your data than other RAID approaches.

All hail the Great Capacitor Brand Finder

Reply 5 of 12, by PCBONEZ

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gdjacobs wrote on 2019-12-31, 05:57:
PCBONEZ wrote on 2019-12-30, 23:24:

If you don't have BU machine already I would acquire a hardware RAID card and at least 2 large drives to use with XP/W2k as an off-line machine to keep backups on.
.

These days, I recommend looking into ZFS on a more beefy build -- hold the RAID card. Hardware RAID stores data on the drives in a proprietary format. Software RAID is compatible with any drive interface, so recovery is much simpler. ZFS does require more RAM, but it's more effective at protecting your data than other RAID approaches.

I can't quite see that on a ME-era HP Pavilion.
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GRUMPY OLD FART - On Hiatus, sort'a
Mann-Made Global Warming. - We should be more concerned about the Intellectual Climate.
You can teach a man to fish and feed him for life, but if he can't handle sushi you must also teach him to cook.

Reply 6 of 12, by elmeyer

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I second kolderman‘s idea, experiment with the Via C3. If it doesn’t have ISA, you can try the SB Live!‘s DOS emulation; many people say it has bad compatibility, but I haven’t actually run into any issues yet. Otherwise get a Yamaha card or an ESS Solo.

EDIT: Might also be worth it to check if the motherboard has a PC/PCI / SB-Link header, by pure chance. That way you’d have DOS sound with no TSRs or anything, ergo better compatibility.

Reply 7 of 12, by PCBONEZ

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Again - It's an HP.
HP BIOS's rarely have microcode for CPUs they don't directly support in a given system.
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GRUMPY OLD FART - On Hiatus, sort'a
Mann-Made Global Warming. - We should be more concerned about the Intellectual Climate.
You can teach a man to fish and feed him for life, but if he can't handle sushi you must also teach him to cook.

Reply 8 of 12, by chinny22

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NT4? if your interested in messing around with old OS's?
2nd PC for Lan gaming, even if its just with yourself 😉

Reply 9 of 12, by gdjacobs

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PCBONEZ wrote on 2019-12-31, 07:28:

I can't quite see that on a ME-era HP Pavilion.
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Indeed. I'm suggesting something a little more modern for NAS. I'd probably look into doing a C3 build with a S370 era Pavilion.

All hail the Great Capacitor Brand Finder

Reply 10 of 12, by Brawndo

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The one piece of advice I can give is to definitely NEVER get rid of old hardware. This stuff is only getting harder and harder to find, and as a poster above already said, you may find a use for it some day. Even if you just store it in the attic for now, hang on to it.

Reply 11 of 12, by PCBONEZ

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Brawndo wrote on 2019-12-31, 18:54:

The one piece of advice I can give is to definitely NEVER get rid of old hardware. This stuff is only getting harder and harder to find, and as a poster above already said, you may find a use for it some day. Even if you just store it in the attic for now, hang on to it.

To a point. My old hardware storage is pushing 600 sqft now.
And that doesn't count the shop, just storage.
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GRUMPY OLD FART - On Hiatus, sort'a
Mann-Made Global Warming. - We should be more concerned about the Intellectual Climate.
You can teach a man to fish and feed him for life, but if he can't handle sushi you must also teach him to cook.

Reply 12 of 12, by SirNickity

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Yeah, of course. 😀 Nobody will insist that you (or anyone) keep old hardware, just don't throw it away. Put it in the hands of someone who can and will care for it and appreciate it, and not just toss it in the dump the first time the CMOS battery dies.