VOGONS


First post, by cyclone3d

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Just trying to go through my excessive stash of parts and trying to figure out what to get rid of.

Other than the odd board that supports low fsb values for speed limiting, is there any compelling reason to go with a Socket 5 or 7 build over a SS7 build?

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Reply 1 of 8, by ODwilly

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cyclone3d wrote on 2020-10-13, 05:12:

Just trying to go through my excessive stash of parts and trying to figure out what to get rid of.

Other than the odd board that supports low fsb values for speed limiting, is there any compelling reason to go with a Socket 5 or 7 build over a SS7 build?

Not really, since SS7 supports every CPU S7 does usually. And as a plus you have AGP in most cases. ATX S7 is really cool, since you can use those boards in literally any case.

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Reply 2 of 8, by dionb

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cyclone3d wrote on 2020-10-13, 05:12:

Just trying to go through my excessive stash of parts and trying to figure out what to get rid of.

Other than the odd board that supports low fsb values for speed limiting, is there any compelling reason to go with a Socket 5 or 7 build over a SS7 build?

VLB and EISA spring to mind, but are hardly common at So5 level either (and there are So7 EISA boards, if not SS7). In both cases you probably sacrifice a lot of perforance and possibly stability/compatibility too (in case of VLB).

Pedant mode: SS7 is So7 anyway, it's just a set of marketing-defined features within the So7 platform.

Reply 3 of 8, by The Serpent Rider

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Depends. If you're not into benchmarking, keep only ATX S7 boards.

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Reply 4 of 8, by bestemor

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I am kinda fond of the Intel AN430TX socket 7 board, with its very low capacitor count - one would think it would contribute to a longer life (or shelflife) than those with a bunch of 'normal' caps... At least for someone with no soldering skills etc... They even have a Yamaha sound card embedded 🙂.
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But I suppose besides that, an SS7 board would perhaps be preferrable, depending on its target use.

Reply 5 of 8, by Baoran

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I always thought that a socket 7 board with something like intel chipset would be more stable and has less problems than super socket 7 boards with MVP3 or ALI chipsets?
Like if you are planning to use a cpu that would work with normal socket 7 and not planning to use AGP card, wouldn't a socket 7 board be the better option or is there something else I am not seeing?

Reply 6 of 8, by TheMobRules

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Baoran wrote on 2020-10-18, 23:18:

I always thought that a socket 7 board with something like intel chipset would be more stable and has less problems than super socket 7 boards with MVP3 or ALI chipsets?
Like if you are planning to use a cpu that would work with normal socket 7 and not planning to use AGP card, wouldn't a socket 7 board be the better option or is there something else I am not seeing?

I guess it's due to SS7 boards being able to cover a larger period of time if you want to use a single build to cover multiple eras. But I know what you mean, in fact I'm slowly getting rid of all my SS7 boards as I have no interest in that platform at all, if regular S7 performance is not enough for something I jump to Slot 1 and above. In the end it depends on what you have available and what you're interested in.

Reply 7 of 8, by Baoran

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TheMobRules wrote on 2020-10-18, 23:42:
Baoran wrote on 2020-10-18, 23:18:

I always thought that a socket 7 board with something like intel chipset would be more stable and has less problems than super socket 7 boards with MVP3 or ALI chipsets?
Like if you are planning to use a cpu that would work with normal socket 7 and not planning to use AGP card, wouldn't a socket 7 board be the better option or is there something else I am not seeing?

I guess it's due to SS7 boards being able to cover a larger period of time if you want to use a single build to cover multiple eras. But I know what you mean, in fact I'm slowly getting rid of all my SS7 boards as I have no interest in that platform at all, if regular S7 performance is not enough for something I jump to Slot 1 and above. In the end it depends on what you have available and what you're interested in.

I was thinking of something like pentium 233mmx build that allows you to slow down the system too. Personally I would feel like socket 7 motherboard would be better. Only reason to use super socket 7 board would be if you wanted to use agp voodoo 3 card. Also some super socket 7 motherboards have 1MB of cache if that matters to you.

Reply 8 of 8, by Tetrium

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cyclone3d wrote on 2020-10-13, 05:12:

Other than the odd board that supports low fsb values for speed limiting, is there any compelling reason to go with a Socket 5 or 7 build over a SS7 build?

Compelling would probably depend on the user too. One other reason could be more compatibility with (mostly older) memory standards like EDO and FPM SIMMs or the odd board that is able to run single SIMMs instead of needing to pair them up.

Perhaps it could be better to look at it from a board to board case?

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