VOGONS


First post, by rojovision

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Anyone ever used one of these? Link

Context: I'm researching power supplies for a Pentium III Win 98 build, and it's my understanding that the 3.3V / 5V rail amperage can be a potential issue on modern PSU's. The Stratus 400W claims to have a fairly respectable 28A and 36A on the 3.3V and 5V rails respectively, which I imagine is plenty for even the most demanding P3 build with room to grow to something like a Voodoo 5500 for the GPU. At time of writing the units are reasonably priced as well through their eBay store (linked on their spec page above).

Rojovision on YouTube

Reply 1 of 7, by darry

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rojovision wrote on 2021-03-11, 03:02:

Anyone ever used one of these? Link

Context: I'm researching power supplies for a Pentium III Win 98 build, and it's my understanding that the 3.3V / 5V rail amperage can be a potential issue on modern PSU's. The Stratus 400W claims to have a fairly respectable 28A and 36A on the 3.3V and 5V rails respectively, which I imagine is plenty for even the most demanding P3 build with room to grow to something like a Voodoo 5500 for the GPU. At time of writing the units are reasonably priced as well through their eBay store (linked on their spec page above).

- Brand that is practically unknown EDIT :they have exactly on PSU model on that site and have had it since 2016
- No 80 Plus efficiency rating
- no load distribution info provided (if you were to max out all rails simultaneously, you would get 477W, so there are load distribution limits, but they are not disclosed)
- Marketed based on 400W "max" rating and a 300W "average" . Translation : don't try to draw more than 300W consistently or who knows...
- Uses meaningless info in description such as "Energy Star Efficiency"without specifying any kind of rating or logo
- No UL certification No UL file number, just a UL logo . Whether that is legitimate or is anybody's guess
EDIT : - It weighs 1.04 Kilograms according to an amazon.ca seller . That is less than 2.3 pounds . a 20 year-old Antec ATX PSU like the PP-303x weighs 5.07 pounds . A current 300W Seasonic SSP-300SFB PSU weighs 2.6 pounds . That is no guarantee, as lighter high quality PSUs do exist (higher efficiency ones dissipate less heat, require less cooling and hence can use smaller/cheaper/lighter heatsinks). Conversely unscrupulous PSU manufacturers have been known to weigh down their PSU casings with cheap filler (concrete or something else cheap and heavy) to give an impression of quality .

Reviews here don't look too great :
https://www.amazon.ca/Dream-Power-Supply-Comp … customerReviews

With all due respect, what do you expect for 35 $US .

TLDR : I would not touch that with a ten-foot pole . EDIT : None of this means this PSU is necessarily bad, dangerous or unusable, just that there are very few hints to judge it by. Someone qualified would have to buy one and disassemble/test/review to know more . At the very least a photo of its internals would give a good idea to someone qualified .

EDIT : corrected typos

Reply 2 of 7, by rojovision

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darry wrote on 2021-03-11, 03:28:
- Brand that is practically unknown EDIT :they have exactly on PSU model on that site and have had it since 2016 - No 80 Plus e […]
Show full quote
rojovision wrote on 2021-03-11, 03:02:

Anyone ever used one of these? Link

Context: I'm researching power supplies for a Pentium III Win 98 build, and it's my understanding that the 3.3V / 5V rail amperage can be a potential issue on modern PSU's. The Stratus 400W claims to have a fairly respectable 28A and 36A on the 3.3V and 5V rails respectively, which I imagine is plenty for even the most demanding P3 build with room to grow to something like a Voodoo 5500 for the GPU. At time of writing the units are reasonably priced as well through their eBay store (linked on their spec page above).

- Brand that is practically unknown EDIT :they have exactly on PSU model on that site and have had it since 2016
- No 80 Plus efficiency rating
- no load distribution info provided (if you were to max out all rails simultaneously, you would get 477W, so there are load distribution limits, but they are not disclosed)
- Marketed based on 400W "max" rating and a 300W "average" . Translation : don't try to draw more than 300W consistently or who knows...
- Uses meaningless info in description such as "Energy Star Efficiency"without specifying any kind of rating or logo
- No UL certification No UL file number, just a UL logo . Whether that is legitimate or is anybody's guess
EDIT : - It weighs 1.04 Kilograms according to an amazon.ca seller . That is less than 2.3 pounds . a 20 year-old Antec ATX PSU like the PP-303x weighs 5.07 pounds . A current 300W Seasonic SSP-300SFB PSU weighs 2.6 pounds . That is no guarantee, as lighter high quality PSUs do exist (higher efficiency ones dissipate less heat, require less cooling and hence can use smaller/cheaper/lighter heatsinks). Conversely unscrupulous PSU manufacturers have been known to weigh down their PSU casings with cheap filler (concrete or something else cheap and heavy) to give an impression of quality .

Reviews here don't look too great :
https://www.amazon.ca/Dream-Power-Supply-Comp … customerReviews

With all due respect, what do you expect for 35 $US .

TLDR : I would not touch that with a ten-foot pole . EDIT : None of this means this PSU is necessarily bad, dangerous or unusable, just that there are very few hints to judge it by. Someone qualified would have to buy one and disassemble/test/review to know more . At the very least a photo of its internals would give a good idea to someone qualified .

EDIT : corrected typos

You make some good points. I certainly wasn't expecting it to be some kind of deal of the century - the low price and minimal 1 year warranty tell a certain story. I figured I'd just ask to see if anyone had taken a chance on one.

The company is also (or was at one time) apparently a PC repair shop of some kind according to their 'about' page so I assumed this was a rebranded unit, as they often are. I've been having a hard time finding an old power supply that I feel like I can trust, even after browsing some old threads. The old PSU's from the era might blow up at any time, and the new reasonably priced ones might also blow up at any time, or don't fulfill the right power requirements. As for the Amazon reviews, they aren't great or terrible, but the sample size is very small. Plus I think it's wise to take any Amazon rating with a grain of salt - anecdotally I feel like many people leave useless reviews, both good and bad, for a number of different reasons such as not knowing how to use what they bought properly or being offered gifts to leave a review, not to mention the fake ones.

Given the price I might pick one up anyway. However, I don't know much about disassembling a PSU safely for a picture or how to tell the good innards from bad.

Rojovision on YouTube

Reply 3 of 7, by darry

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rojovision wrote on 2021-03-11, 06:00:
You make some good points. I certainly wasn't expecting it to be some kind of deal of the century - the low price and minimal 1 […]
Show full quote
darry wrote on 2021-03-11, 03:28:
- Brand that is practically unknown EDIT :they have exactly on PSU model on that site and have had it since 2016 - No 80 Plus e […]
Show full quote
rojovision wrote on 2021-03-11, 03:02:

Anyone ever used one of these? Link

Context: I'm researching power supplies for a Pentium III Win 98 build, and it's my understanding that the 3.3V / 5V rail amperage can be a potential issue on modern PSU's. The Stratus 400W claims to have a fairly respectable 28A and 36A on the 3.3V and 5V rails respectively, which I imagine is plenty for even the most demanding P3 build with room to grow to something like a Voodoo 5500 for the GPU. At time of writing the units are reasonably priced as well through their eBay store (linked on their spec page above).

- Brand that is practically unknown EDIT :they have exactly on PSU model on that site and have had it since 2016
- No 80 Plus efficiency rating
- no load distribution info provided (if you were to max out all rails simultaneously, you would get 477W, so there are load distribution limits, but they are not disclosed)
- Marketed based on 400W "max" rating and a 300W "average" . Translation : don't try to draw more than 300W consistently or who knows...
- Uses meaningless info in description such as "Energy Star Efficiency"without specifying any kind of rating or logo
- No UL certification No UL file number, just a UL logo . Whether that is legitimate or is anybody's guess
EDIT : - It weighs 1.04 Kilograms according to an amazon.ca seller . That is less than 2.3 pounds . a 20 year-old Antec ATX PSU like the PP-303x weighs 5.07 pounds . A current 300W Seasonic SSP-300SFB PSU weighs 2.6 pounds . That is no guarantee, as lighter high quality PSUs do exist (higher efficiency ones dissipate less heat, require less cooling and hence can use smaller/cheaper/lighter heatsinks). Conversely unscrupulous PSU manufacturers have been known to weigh down their PSU casings with cheap filler (concrete or something else cheap and heavy) to give an impression of quality .

Reviews here don't look too great :
https://www.amazon.ca/Dream-Power-Supply-Comp … customerReviews

With all due respect, what do you expect for 35 $US .

TLDR : I would not touch that with a ten-foot pole . EDIT : None of this means this PSU is necessarily bad, dangerous or unusable, just that there are very few hints to judge it by. Someone qualified would have to buy one and disassemble/test/review to know more . At the very least a photo of its internals would give a good idea to someone qualified .

EDIT : corrected typos

You make some good points. I certainly wasn't expecting it to be some kind of deal of the century - the low price and minimal 1 year warranty tell a certain story. I figured I'd just ask to see if anyone had taken a chance on one.

The company is also (or was at one time) apparently a PC repair shop of some kind according to their 'about' page so I assumed this was a rebranded unit, as they often are. I've been having a hard time finding an old power supply that I feel like I can trust, even after browsing some old threads. The old PSU's from the era might blow up at any time, and the new reasonably priced ones might also blow up at any time, or don't fulfill the right power requirements. As for the Amazon reviews, they aren't great or terrible, but the sample size is very small. Plus I think it's wise to take any Amazon rating with a grain of salt - anecdotally I feel like many people leave useless reviews, both good and bad, for a number of different reasons such as not knowing how to use what they bought properly or being offered gifts to leave a review, not to mention the fake ones.

Given the price I might pick one up anyway. However, I don't know much about disassembling a PSU safely for a picture or how to tell the good innards from bad.

I agree that is likely either made to order and branded accordingly or, IMHO more likely, a ready-made model that can be bought in lots with whatever branding/packaging is desired.

You have a good point about some online reviews being pointless . My "favorites" are when the reviewer is basically demonstrating to all in his review that he bought the wrong product (in spite of the seller's description) and somehow tries to blame the seller or product for his own ignorance/laziness/inattentiveness/stupidity while making a spectacle of himself to anybody and everybody with more than 2 working brain cells . Fun stuff .

You also have a point about sample size . That said, people tend to complain when things go wrong more than they tend to take the time to praise when they are happy (at least that has been my experience). So even with such a small sampling size, such a high number of complaints is noteworthy if not statistically conclusive, IMHO .

If you are not comfortable opening a PSU, I respect that, and would definitely NOT want you to do anything that makes you feel unsafe . That being said, it's usually four screws and the top comes right off . The only dangerous things are the large capacitors (they may still have a dangerously charge if the PSU was plugged in recently ). These can only be dangerous if their leads (or something connect) are touched . Never open a currently mains connected PSU .

In an ideal world, recommending an affordable and suitable PSU would imply suggesting a used vintage properly specced unit from a reputable brand . Unfortunately, the ideal time frame for those units overlaps with the "capacitor plague", so practically any used PSU from that era should be inspected and possibly re-capped (new capacitors installed) by someone qualified .

The solution that I chose is to throw money at the problem . I purchased a new Corsair RM850x (good reputation, design/manufacturing/reviews, high quality components) . It is overkill on the 12V side, but the 3.3V/5V side can provide up to 150W which is enough for my needs and even allow a safety margin . With the load I will be putting on it, that PSU might outlast me, or at least my interest in the hobby. I imagine I will have developed other interests/priorities by the time I am committed to an assisted living facility, vicariously surviving between diaper changes and pureed meals as I ramble on to anybody and nobody about the "good old days" as my sense of self, will to live and ability to think slowly leave me and soften my resolve, not unlike air seeping out of a slow flat tire (maybe there's a metaphor in there somewhere, or maybe it's the wine and COVID weariness talking) .

Getting back to the subject, other than a bad PSU itself failing, my fear is that a really crappy one might take out the whole system or start a fire . My paranoia is high on that front .

EDIT : Belatedly added important missing word .

Last edited by darry on 2022-06-21, 01:42. Edited 1 time in total.

Reply 4 of 7, by rojovision

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darry wrote on 2021-03-11, 06:47:
I agree that is likely either made to order and branded accordingly or, IMHO more likely, a ready-made model that can be bought […]
Show full quote
rojovision wrote on 2021-03-11, 06:00:
You make some good points. I certainly wasn't expecting it to be some kind of deal of the century - the low price and minimal 1 […]
Show full quote
darry wrote on 2021-03-11, 03:28:
- Brand that is practically unknown EDIT :they have exactly on PSU model on that site and have had it since 2016 - No 80 Plus e […]
Show full quote

- Brand that is practically unknown EDIT :they have exactly on PSU model on that site and have had it since 2016
- No 80 Plus efficiency rating
- no load distribution info provided (if you were to max out all rails simultaneously, you would get 477W, so there are load distribution limits, but they are not disclosed)
- Marketed based on 400W "max" rating and a 300W "average" . Translation : don't try to draw more than 300W consistently or who knows...
- Uses meaningless info in description such as "Energy Star Efficiency"without specifying any kind of rating or logo
- No UL certification No UL file number, just a UL logo . Whether that is legitimate or is anybody's guess
EDIT : - It weighs 1.04 Kilograms according to an amazon.ca seller . That is less than 2.3 pounds . a 20 year-old Antec ATX PSU like the PP-303x weighs 5.07 pounds . A current 300W Seasonic SSP-300SFB PSU weighs 2.6 pounds . That is no guarantee, as lighter high quality PSUs do exist (higher efficiency ones dissipate less heat, require less cooling and hence can use smaller/cheaper/lighter heatsinks). Conversely unscrupulous PSU manufacturers have been known to weigh down their PSU casings with cheap filler (concrete or something else cheap and heavy) to give an impression of quality .

Reviews here don't look too great :
https://www.amazon.ca/Dream-Power-Supply-Comp … customerReviews

With all due respect, what do you expect for 35 $US .

TLDR : I would not touch that with a ten-foot pole . EDIT : None of this means this PSU is necessarily bad, dangerous or unusable, just that there are very few hints to judge it by. Someone qualified would have to buy one and disassemble/test/review to know more . At the very least a photo of its internals would give a good idea to someone qualified .

EDIT : corrected typos

You make some good points. I certainly wasn't expecting it to be some kind of deal of the century - the low price and minimal 1 year warranty tell a certain story. I figured I'd just ask to see if anyone had taken a chance on one.

The company is also (or was at one time) apparently a PC repair shop of some kind according to their 'about' page so I assumed this was a rebranded unit, as they often are. I've been having a hard time finding an old power supply that I feel like I can trust, even after browsing some old threads. The old PSU's from the era might blow up at any time, and the new reasonably priced ones might also blow up at any time, or don't fulfill the right power requirements. As for the Amazon reviews, they aren't great or terrible, but the sample size is very small. Plus I think it's wise to take any Amazon rating with a grain of salt - anecdotally I feel like many people leave useless reviews, both good and bad, for a number of different reasons such as not knowing how to use what they bought properly or being offered gifts to leave a review, not to mention the fake ones.

Given the price I might pick one up anyway. However, I don't know much about disassembling a PSU safely for a picture or how to tell the good innards from bad.

I agree that is likely either made to order and branded accordingly or, IMHO more likely, a ready-made model that can be bought in lots with whatever branding/packaging is desired.

You have a good point about some online reviews being pointless . My "favorites" are when the reviewer is basically demonstrating to all in his review that he bought the wrong product (in spite of the seller's description) and somehow tries to blame the seller or product for his own ignorance/laziness/inattentiveness/stupidity while making a spectacle of himself to anybody and everybody with more than 2 working brain cells . Fun stuff .

You also have a point about sample size . That said, people tend to complain when things go wrong more than they tend to take the time to praise when they are happy (at least that has been my experience). So even with such a small sampling size, such a high number of complaints is noteworthy if not statistically conclusive, IMHO .

If you are not comfortable opening a PSU, I respect that, and would definitely want you to do anything that makes you feel unsafe . That being said, it's usually four screws and the top comes right off . The only dangerous things are the large capacitors (they may still have a dangerously charge if the PSU was plugged in recently ). These can only be dangerous if their leads (or something connect) are touched . Never open a currently mains connected PSU .

In an ideal world, recommending an affordable and suitable PSU would imply suggesting a used vintage properly specced unit from a reputable brand . Unfortunately, the ideal time frame for those units overlaps with the "capacitor plague", so practically any used PSU from that era should be inspected and possibly re-capped (new capacitors installed) by someone qualified .

The solution that I chose is to throw money at the problem . I purchased a new Corsair RM850x (good reputation, design/manufacturing/reviews, high quality components) . It is overkill on the 12V side, but the 3.3V/5V side can provide up to 150W which is enough for my needs and even allow a safety margin . With the load I will be putting on it, that PSU might outlast me, or at least my interest in the hobby. I imagine I will have developed other interests/priorities by the time I am committed to an assisted living facility, vicariously surviving between diaper changes and pureed meals as I ramble on to anybody and nobody about the "good old days" as my sense of self, will to live and ability to think slowly leave me and soften my resolve, not unlike air seeping out of a slow flat tire (maybe there's a metaphor in there somewhere, or maybe it's the wine and COVID weariness talking) .

Getting back to the subject, other than a bad PSU itself failing, my fear is that a really crappy one might take out the whole system or start a fire . My paranoia is high on that front .

Yeah that's my biggest fear - buying an expensive Voodoo and then destroying it with a faulty PSU. That said, I've decided to pick one of these units up. For science.

I think I understand what's going on as far as the branding. On eBay Dream PC sells this one unit under a bunch of different listings that reference specific OEM or system builder PC models (Dell Optiplex 775 for example). As a repair shop that services both businesses and home users, they probably see bad PSU's day in and day out, so they partnered with a manufacturer to slap their own branded labels on a PSU that will work to keep some of these old office PC's limping along on the cheap. Margins are probably slim, but honestly it seems like a fairly savvy business decision if I'm right.

Ultimately I may end up doing the same thing you did and spend up on a reputable modern unit, but when I get this one I'll try and upload some pictures. It sounds like just taking the top off the thing shouldn't be too much of an issue.

Rojovision on YouTube

Reply 5 of 7, by darry

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rojovision wrote on 2021-03-11, 17:04:
Yeah that's my biggest fear - buying an expensive Voodoo and then destroying it with a faulty PSU. That said, I've decided to p […]
Show full quote
darry wrote on 2021-03-11, 06:47:
I agree that is likely either made to order and branded accordingly or, IMHO more likely, a ready-made model that can be bought […]
Show full quote
rojovision wrote on 2021-03-11, 06:00:

You make some good points. I certainly wasn't expecting it to be some kind of deal of the century - the low price and minimal 1 year warranty tell a certain story. I figured I'd just ask to see if anyone had taken a chance on one.

The company is also (or was at one time) apparently a PC repair shop of some kind according to their 'about' page so I assumed this was a rebranded unit, as they often are. I've been having a hard time finding an old power supply that I feel like I can trust, even after browsing some old threads. The old PSU's from the era might blow up at any time, and the new reasonably priced ones might also blow up at any time, or don't fulfill the right power requirements. As for the Amazon reviews, they aren't great or terrible, but the sample size is very small. Plus I think it's wise to take any Amazon rating with a grain of salt - anecdotally I feel like many people leave useless reviews, both good and bad, for a number of different reasons such as not knowing how to use what they bought properly or being offered gifts to leave a review, not to mention the fake ones.

Given the price I might pick one up anyway. However, I don't know much about disassembling a PSU safely for a picture or how to tell the good innards from bad.

I agree that is likely either made to order and branded accordingly or, IMHO more likely, a ready-made model that can be bought in lots with whatever branding/packaging is desired.

You have a good point about some online reviews being pointless . My "favorites" are when the reviewer is basically demonstrating to all in his review that he bought the wrong product (in spite of the seller's description) and somehow tries to blame the seller or product for his own ignorance/laziness/inattentiveness/stupidity while making a spectacle of himself to anybody and everybody with more than 2 working brain cells . Fun stuff .

You also have a point about sample size . That said, people tend to complain when things go wrong more than they tend to take the time to praise when they are happy (at least that has been my experience). So even with such a small sampling size, such a high number of complaints is noteworthy if not statistically conclusive, IMHO .

If you are not comfortable opening a PSU, I respect that, and would definitely want you to do anything that makes you feel unsafe . That being said, it's usually four screws and the top comes right off . The only dangerous things are the large capacitors (they may still have a dangerously charge if the PSU was plugged in recently ). These can only be dangerous if their leads (or something connect) are touched . Never open a currently mains connected PSU .

In an ideal world, recommending an affordable and suitable PSU would imply suggesting a used vintage properly specced unit from a reputable brand . Unfortunately, the ideal time frame for those units overlaps with the "capacitor plague", so practically any used PSU from that era should be inspected and possibly re-capped (new capacitors installed) by someone qualified .

The solution that I chose is to throw money at the problem . I purchased a new Corsair RM850x (good reputation, design/manufacturing/reviews, high quality components) . It is overkill on the 12V side, but the 3.3V/5V side can provide up to 150W which is enough for my needs and even allow a safety margin . With the load I will be putting on it, that PSU might outlast me, or at least my interest in the hobby. I imagine I will have developed other interests/priorities by the time I am committed to an assisted living facility, vicariously surviving between diaper changes and pureed meals as I ramble on to anybody and nobody about the "good old days" as my sense of self, will to live and ability to think slowly leave me and soften my resolve, not unlike air seeping out of a slow flat tire (maybe there's a metaphor in there somewhere, or maybe it's the wine and COVID weariness talking) .

Getting back to the subject, other than a bad PSU itself failing, my fear is that a really crappy one might take out the whole system or start a fire . My paranoia is high on that front .

Yeah that's my biggest fear - buying an expensive Voodoo and then destroying it with a faulty PSU. That said, I've decided to pick one of these units up. For science.

I think I understand what's going on as far as the branding. On eBay Dream PC sells this one unit under a bunch of different listings that reference specific OEM or system builder PC models (Dell Optiplex 775 for example). As a repair shop that services both businesses and home users, they probably see bad PSU's day in and day out, so they partnered with a manufacturer to slap their own branded labels on a PSU that will work to keep some of these old office PC's limping along on the cheap. Margins are probably slim, but honestly it seems like a fairly savvy business decision if I'm right.

Ultimately I may end up doing the same thing you did and spend up on a reputable modern unit, but when I get this one I'll try and upload some pictures. It sounds like just taking the top off the thing shouldn't be too much of an issue.

I have often bought relatively inexpensive but poorly documented things to test out for my own curiosity and sometimes to report about . I am not the only one to do this either . So if you are interested, can afford it and feel comfortable with it, do go for it . We will all learn from it and, IMHO, it is one of the ways we can give back to the community .

Cheers!

P.S. Sorry for my possibly depressive sounding assisted living rambling yesterday . I actually laughed when I re-read myself . I hope it came out as humorous more than anything and certainly not demeaning to people currently in that kind of situation .

Reply 6 of 7, by rojovision

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darry wrote on 2021-03-11, 17:41:
I have often bought relatively inexpensive but poorly documented things to test out for my own curiosity and sometimes to report […]
Show full quote
rojovision wrote on 2021-03-11, 17:04:
Yeah that's my biggest fear - buying an expensive Voodoo and then destroying it with a faulty PSU. That said, I've decided to p […]
Show full quote
darry wrote on 2021-03-11, 06:47:
I agree that is likely either made to order and branded accordingly or, IMHO more likely, a ready-made model that can be bought […]
Show full quote

I agree that is likely either made to order and branded accordingly or, IMHO more likely, a ready-made model that can be bought in lots with whatever branding/packaging is desired.

You have a good point about some online reviews being pointless . My "favorites" are when the reviewer is basically demonstrating to all in his review that he bought the wrong product (in spite of the seller's description) and somehow tries to blame the seller or product for his own ignorance/laziness/inattentiveness/stupidity while making a spectacle of himself to anybody and everybody with more than 2 working brain cells . Fun stuff .

You also have a point about sample size . That said, people tend to complain when things go wrong more than they tend to take the time to praise when they are happy (at least that has been my experience). So even with such a small sampling size, such a high number of complaints is noteworthy if not statistically conclusive, IMHO .

If you are not comfortable opening a PSU, I respect that, and would definitely want you to do anything that makes you feel unsafe . That being said, it's usually four screws and the top comes right off . The only dangerous things are the large capacitors (they may still have a dangerously charge if the PSU was plugged in recently ). These can only be dangerous if their leads (or something connect) are touched . Never open a currently mains connected PSU .

In an ideal world, recommending an affordable and suitable PSU would imply suggesting a used vintage properly specced unit from a reputable brand . Unfortunately, the ideal time frame for those units overlaps with the "capacitor plague", so practically any used PSU from that era should be inspected and possibly re-capped (new capacitors installed) by someone qualified .

The solution that I chose is to throw money at the problem . I purchased a new Corsair RM850x (good reputation, design/manufacturing/reviews, high quality components) . It is overkill on the 12V side, but the 3.3V/5V side can provide up to 150W which is enough for my needs and even allow a safety margin . With the load I will be putting on it, that PSU might outlast me, or at least my interest in the hobby. I imagine I will have developed other interests/priorities by the time I am committed to an assisted living facility, vicariously surviving between diaper changes and pureed meals as I ramble on to anybody and nobody about the "good old days" as my sense of self, will to live and ability to think slowly leave me and soften my resolve, not unlike air seeping out of a slow flat tire (maybe there's a metaphor in there somewhere, or maybe it's the wine and COVID weariness talking) .

Getting back to the subject, other than a bad PSU itself failing, my fear is that a really crappy one might take out the whole system or start a fire . My paranoia is high on that front .

Yeah that's my biggest fear - buying an expensive Voodoo and then destroying it with a faulty PSU. That said, I've decided to pick one of these units up. For science.

I think I understand what's going on as far as the branding. On eBay Dream PC sells this one unit under a bunch of different listings that reference specific OEM or system builder PC models (Dell Optiplex 775 for example). As a repair shop that services both businesses and home users, they probably see bad PSU's day in and day out, so they partnered with a manufacturer to slap their own branded labels on a PSU that will work to keep some of these old office PC's limping along on the cheap. Margins are probably slim, but honestly it seems like a fairly savvy business decision if I'm right.

Ultimately I may end up doing the same thing you did and spend up on a reputable modern unit, but when I get this one I'll try and upload some pictures. It sounds like just taking the top off the thing shouldn't be too much of an issue.

I have often bought relatively inexpensive but poorly documented things to test out for my own curiosity and sometimes to report about . I am not the only one to do this either . So if you are interested, can afford it and feel comfortable with it, do go for it . We will all learn from it and, IMHO, it is one of the ways we can give back to the community .

Cheers!

P.S. Sorry for my possibly depressive sounding assisted living rambling yesterday . I actually laughed when I re-read myself . I hope it came out as humorous more than anything and certainly not demeaning to people currently in that kind of situation .

No worries. I had a laugh while reading it.

Rojovision on YouTube

Reply 7 of 7, by rojovision

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Well I got the power supply. Except they sent me a totally different one from Apower. Normally this would probably be fine - it's got similar connectors and a higher max wattage (450w), but unfortunately it only has 20A on the 3.3V and 5V rails. Apparently they won't be getting any power supplies like the one they're claiming to sell in the eBay listing any time soon, so buyer beware I guess. I'm sending it back, and so far there haven't been any issues with getting it returned, so that's good at least.

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20210315_170604.png
Filename
20210315_170604.png
File size
1.5 MiB
Views
225 views
File license
Public domain

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