VOGONS


First post, by Rikintosh

User metadata
Rank Member
Rank
Member

Traditional X86 computers that are disguised as another device, such as routers, sound systems, controllers, and even modules (An entire computer, as a module of another computer, such as SOC cards)...

Let's leave the risc, arm, etc, out. Only computers that can be hacked to be used as a personal computer.

Take a look at my retro blog: https://ricardoramosinformatica.blogspot.com/
My Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfRUbxkBmEihBEkIK32Hilg

Reply 1 of 30, by cyclone3d

User metadata
Rank l33t++
Rank
l33t++

DMX Music ProFusion X Digital Media Manager - forget the specs but it houses a motherboard with a riser setup.

Castelle FaxPress Premier - has an SBC setup with a Pentium III - 933.

Yamaha YMF modified setupds and drivers
Yamaha XG resource repository - updated November 27, 2018
Yamaha YMF7x4 Guide
AW744L II - YMF744 - AOpen Cobra Sound Card - Install SB-Link Header

Reply 2 of 30, by Vynix

User metadata
Rank Member
Rank
Member

I recall some Astaro (laher Sophos) security gateways were built around Pentium 4 motherboards, and with a little fiddling you could get them to boot a different OS.

There's another one that I don't remember pretty well (I think it was the Cisco PIX 506E?) at the moment that used a Celeron 300A PPGA, although unlike the Astaro/Sophos gateways this one used a plain ol' Celeron but the rest of the architecture was more or less custom and as such can't be modded to be turned into a plain PC.. So in a way I guess this last one doesn't count?

Proud owner of a Shuttle HOT-555A 430VX motherboard and two wonderful retro laptops, namely a Compaq Armada 1700 [nonfunctional] and a HP Omnibook XE3-GC [fully working :p]

Reply 3 of 30, by Rikintosh

User metadata
Rank Member
Rank
Member

I had an Akai sampler, which used an 8088 processor or something. Unfortunately I sold it before I could study it better.

Proxim RangeLAN 2 - It was a 386 with a wireless card in the early 90's

Pfsense Router Hardware Mi4005L - its a Intel Core I3-4005

Take a look at my retro blog: https://ricardoramosinformatica.blogspot.com/
My Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfRUbxkBmEihBEkIK32Hilg

Reply 5 of 30, by RetroGamer4Ever

User metadata
Rank Member
Rank
Member

The first-generation Blu-Ray and HD-DVD players were not at all like what you'd find on the retail shelves in the second-generation, in that they were essentially x86 PCs with optical drives, contained in what would be commonly known as an HTPC/Media Center chassis design. This was because the player chips - based on what was already used in DVD players and set-top boxes - for the two formats were not in the manufacturing stage and still in development, which required the use of very expensive PC hardware and all-metal chassis to launch the formats.

Reply 6 of 30, by cyclone3d

User metadata
Rank l33t++
Rank
l33t++

I see listings on eBay for arcade machine parts. Looks like a lot of the are regular computers with just a specific game program running on them.

Yamaha YMF modified setupds and drivers
Yamaha XG resource repository - updated November 27, 2018
Yamaha YMF7x4 Guide
AW744L II - YMF744 - AOpen Cobra Sound Card - Install SB-Link Header

Reply 7 of 30, by Jo22

User metadata
Rank l33t++
Rank
l33t++

Surfstation JNT (old x86 internet setup box)
T-Online S100 (old x86 media center/streaming box)

"Time, it seems, doesn't flow. For some it's fast, for some it's slow.
In what to one race is no time at all, another race can rise and fall..." - The Minstrel

//My video channel//

Reply 9 of 30, by dormcat

User metadata
Rank Member
Rank
Member

Many info kiosks, ATM, and POS machines are just x86 computers. It's funny when they reboot.

Attachments

Reply 10 of 30, by Jo22

User metadata
Rank l33t++
Rank
l33t++
AppleSauce wrote on 2022-06-19, 08:42:

I've seen some oscilloscope listings that were full on pentium 1 computers inside.

Right. I've seen Spectrum Analyzers from Rhode&Schwarz that ran on Windows XP.. 🤣

"Time, it seems, doesn't flow. For some it's fast, for some it's slow.
In what to one race is no time at all, another race can rise and fall..." - The Minstrel

//My video channel//

Reply 11 of 30, by Tiido

User metadata
Rank l33t
Rank
l33t

My friend's modern Roland keyboards run on x86 PC hardware + linux. With boot time and all 🤣
Many oscilloscopes are like that too, there are linux and windows based things.

T-04YBSC, a new YMF71x based sound card & Official VOGONS thread about it
Newly made 4MB 60ns 30pin SIMMs ~
mida sa loed ? nagunii aru ei saa 😜

Reply 12 of 30, by waterbeesje

User metadata
Rank Oldbie
Rank
Oldbie

At work we had a Kyocera Mita plotter, when it finally deceased it was taken apart. From it's remains I harvested an AMD Duron with unknown brand mobo, ram an Seagate HDD. It ran some linux/Unix os.

Stuck at 10MHz...

Reply 13 of 30, by PcBytes

User metadata
Rank Oldbie
Rank
Oldbie

Gigabyte 8IG1000 Pro from an discarded AGFA D-Lab thingy. The whole monster ran two PCs, one was a MPU and a PPU if I remember correctly. Wouldn't connect properly anymore so it was discarded, and I managed to snag the 8IG1000 Pro specifically.

Had to update the BIOS from the modified AGFA dlab BIOS on it (FGx I think it was, not sure) to the latest one available on Gigabyte's website (FI, dated 09 Sept. 2004) and so far it's been powering one of my XP retro rigs just fine. Gotta find a suitable PSU and HSF for it though as I took the rather uninspired choice to go with a 3GHz HT Prescott...

One of the AT machines I own was finally discarded last year by its original owner after being in service for almost 20 years. Used with XP to drive some big cut plotter.

Generic AT machine w/ PCChips M726MRT, Celeron 533MHz if I remember correctly, about 256MB of RAM, a 10GB Quantum LCT10 (I also have the 15GB variant of that drive.), ASTI 200W PSU made by L&C/Deer (which got rebuilt a few days before I left for my 2nd year finals), one of those CSX-917D cases (that's supposedly been sought after by some of the members here, from what I recall seeing a few years ago), and originally came with some broken and totally nonfunctional LG and Philips DVD drives which have been since replaced by a single ASUS DRW-1814BL DVD-RW drive I had around.

Pretty much these two were mostly the few I've seen. The second one I know it's not a PC in disguise, but I would've expected something else to drive a very big cut plotter, not some standard PC (and a baby-AT machine w/ a PCChips mobo at that.)

Vynix wrote on 2022-06-19, 01:25:

I recall some Astaro (laher Sophos) security gateways were built around Pentium 4 motherboards, and with a little fiddling you could get them to boot a different OS.

There's another one that I don't remember pretty well (I think it was the Cisco PIX 506E?) at the moment that used a Celeron 300A PPGA, although unlike the Astaro/Sophos gateways this one used a plain ol' Celeron but the rest of the architecture was more or less custom and as such can't be modded to be turned into a plain PC.. So in a way I guess this last one doesn't count?

Speaking of SBCs, IIRC one of Sony's PS2 TOOL machines was literally a SBC based Pentium 233 MMX, although I've heard of units that were upgraded to Celeron/Pentium 3 SBCs.

"Enter at your own peril, past the bolted door..."
Main PC: i5 3470, GB B75M-D3H, 16GB RAM, 2x1TB
98SE : P3 650, Soyo SY-6BA+IV, 384MB RAM, 80GB

Reply 14 of 30, by Rikintosh

User metadata
Rank Member
Rank
Member

Yes, many arcades are computers (or a common video game inside). ATMs used to run Win NT or OS/2, as well as kiosks. Even slot machines... Slot machines had a configuration that allowed you to adjust the player's chance of winning, and always asked to leave between 1 and 2%. Well, at least here in my country...

There were also those teddy bear picking machines, they didn't have a computer inside, but there was a potentiometer that regulated the grip pressure, so the machine would only pick up light items. There was another machine, who regardless of his experience and accuracy in grabbing the prize, she wouldn't give him the prize until there was a certain amount of money in her safe. Until today it works this way (those machines that have cell phones inside), if a cell phone costs 100 dollars in the market, then it will be programmed to release it only when there is already more than 200 profit inside it. Otherwise, even if you do everything correctly, she will do something to not let you win. There was a case here in my country, of a boy who won. When you win, the machine releases the cell phone box (all are empty, but inside there is a phone number that you must call to know where to get the cell phone you won), the young man called, and was surprised, they said it was impossible he won, because that machine was programmed FOR NOBODY TO WIN 🤣

I worked a few years maintaining these things. Dance machines from the 90's used 3DFX video cards. There was an F1 simulator (it was a 1:1 scale F1 car, with a mechanical system that made it move, and blow wind in the player's face, with 3 LCD screens) it had a Core2Quad processor, and 8800 in SLI , and ran a modified version of r-factor. At the time (in 2008 or 2009) it cost about 20 thousand dollars

Attachments

Take a look at my retro blog: https://ricardoramosinformatica.blogspot.com/
My Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfRUbxkBmEihBEkIK32Hilg

Reply 15 of 30, by lolo799

User metadata
Rank Oldbie
Rank
Oldbie
PcBytes wrote on 2022-06-19, 17:26:

Speaking of SBCs, IIRC one of Sony's PS2 TOOL machines was literally a SBC based Pentium 233 MMX, although I've heard of units that were upgraded to Celeron/Pentium 3 SBCs.

Yes, there were 2 models of halfsize PCI SBC used in the PS2 devkits.

PCMCIA Sound, Storage & Graphics

Reply 16 of 30, by Rikintosh

User metadata
Rank Member
Rank
Member

Too bad microsoft destroyed the first xbox prototypes... The people from the direct x department had built the first prototype of the console using a dell latitude notebook or something

Take a look at my retro blog: https://ricardoramosinformatica.blogspot.com/
My Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfRUbxkBmEihBEkIK32Hilg

Reply 17 of 30, by pentiumspeed

User metadata
Rank Oldbie
Rank
Oldbie

I have pair of boards using TX chipset, socketed pentium mmx 266 using low profile wide heatsink that was used in phone routing system. Fairly common on ebay if you want to look for these to harvest parts and 266MMX processors.

These boards is non-standard factor, cannot be adapted to the ISA/PCI configuration.

Cheers,

Great Northern aka Canada.

Reply 18 of 30, by cyclone3d

User metadata
Rank l33t++
Rank
l33t++
pentiumspeed wrote on 2022-06-19, 18:50:

I have pair of boards using TX chipset, socketed pentium mmx 266 using low profile wide heatsink that was used in phone routing system. Fairly common on ebay if you want to look for these to harvest parts and 266MMX processors.

These boards is non-standard factor, cannot be adapted to the ISA/PCI configuration.

Cheers,

Mind telling us what system exactly?

Yamaha YMF modified setupds and drivers
Yamaha XG resource repository - updated November 27, 2018
Yamaha YMF7x4 Guide
AW744L II - YMF744 - AOpen Cobra Sound Card - Install SB-Link Header

Reply 19 of 30, by Horun

User metadata
Rank l33t
Rank
l33t

A few years ago stumbled on an older video surveillance box that a business was tossing out. Inside was two boards, one a specialty micro-atx style with soldered cpu and 2 x 64Mb DIMMS in sockets. The other board had a dozen video inputs and bunch of Conextant and Motorola chips and few big ribbon cables going to the processor board. I took the DIMMS and two hard drives but left the rest because I did not think the cpu board could ever be converted.... wish now I would have saved it just for kicks.

Hate posting a reply and then have to edit it because it made no sense 😁 First computer was an IBM 3270 workstation with CGA monitor.