VOGONS

Common searches


First post, by computergeek92

User metadata
Rank Oldbie
Rank
Oldbie

Can a dual 1GHZ Coppermine (100mhz fsb) Pentium III PC with 2GB PC100 ram and a Sata 150MB/s hard drive burn Blu-Ray data discs? (Only as a computer server file backup, Not an actual movie disc)

Dedicated Windows 95 Aficionado for good reasons:
http://toastytech.com/evil/setup.html

Reply 2 of 14, by Errius

User metadata
Rank l33t
Rank
l33t

I used to burn Blu Rays on a twin 1.4 tully system with PATA drive (GBW-H10N)

“Your mission is to attack and destroy the Apple Computer manufacturing plant. You are allotted 35 bombs and 60 lasers."

Reply 3 of 14, by PhilsComputerLab

User metadata
Rank Hardware Mod
Rank
Hardware Mod
dr_st wrote:

BluRay 1x is 36Mbit/s (4.5MB/s). I would think it would be within the capabilities of the system...

That's going to take a while to burn that disc 😀

YouTube, Facebook, Website

Reply 4 of 14, by mrau

User metadata
Rank Oldbie
Rank
Oldbie

5MBps is the minimal reading speed, but writing should be possible with a lower speed, no? not that you would really want to, cos it takes all weekend;
also, are there any scsi/sas devices out there? i always thought burning is easier on the system with scsi?

Reply 5 of 14, by dr_st

User metadata
Rank l33t
Rank
l33t
PhilsComputerLab wrote:

That's going to take a while to burn that disc 😀

About an hour and a half. Not much different than burning CDs at 1x CD speed. 😉

https://cloakedthargoid.wordpress.com/ - Random content on hardware, software, games and toys

Reply 7 of 14, by havli

User metadata
Rank Oldbie
Rank
Oldbie

Yeah, I'm using bluray for backups as well. Regular 25GB disc takes ~20 min to burn at 4x and another 20 to verify.
Price per GB is quite good... the question is long term reliability...

HW museum.cz - my collection of PC hardware

Reply 9 of 14, by Standard Def Steve

User metadata
Rank Oldbie
Rank
Oldbie

I don't think there will be any problems burning BDs with that system.
The slowest system I burned a BD-R on was a S939 system with a dual core Opteron at 3GHz. I was burning a BD movie image stored on my file server. The system was pulling the file over GbE, which probably increased CPU load a bit. Burning at the drive's max speed (12x or 54MB/s, if the 1x = 4.5MB/s stated above is correct) CPU load was in the 10-15% range if I remember correctly.

Based on that, and taking into account the difference in CPU performance (I'm also assuming that your source file is stored on a local HDD), I think a dual P3 1GHz would be just fine burning a BD, even at the drive's maximum speed.

Standard Def Rigs
Super P3: PIII-S @ 1.63 GHz/FSB155 | 2GB DDR-310 | 6800GT AGP | 500GB 7200 RPM
Super G4: 2x PowerPC 7455 @ 1.5 GHz | 2GB DDR-333 | 7800GS AGP | 300GB 10k RPM
Super G5: 4x PowerPC 970 @ 2.5 GHz | 16GB DDR2-533 | x1950XT PCIe | 512GB SSD

Reply 10 of 14, by mrau

User metadata
Rank Oldbie
Rank
Oldbie

interesting
imho pulling off of lan over a fast NIC will usually yield a lower load than reading from HD (maybe except for scsi)
it is my experience with dvd burning, that disks were destroyed mostly because windows does background jobs and will sometimes cause huge reads that would not allow reading the ISO timely;
also: are opterons not vastly superior to p3 when it comes to just pumping data from one device to another?

Reply 11 of 14, by Scali

User metadata
Rank l33t
Rank
l33t
mrau wrote:

the problem where high load on the cpu will destroy the medium still exists?

I think that problem was solved many years ago, with buffer underrun protection?
Basically they made the burn process 're-entrant', so if the buffer runs out, the burner can stop burning immediately, and it can resume as soon as the buffer is replenished.
I would think that most, if not all burners on the market support it by now. I haven't had a burner without it since the DVD days anyway.

http://scalibq.wordpress.com/just-keeping-it- … ro-programming/

Reply 12 of 14, by computergeek92

User metadata
Rank Oldbie
Rank
Oldbie

Time ain't a trouble for me. I prefer to burn cd-roms at 2x or 4x so they can be read on my oldest drives. Waiting half an hour is fine. (Just make a cup of coffee and have lunch people!) 😁 BTW they're only for server backups anyhow since blu-rays are more resistant to scratches - especially if you use Delkin or Verbatim "Archival disks" that come with a scratch resistant coating!

Dedicated Windows 95 Aficionado for good reasons:
http://toastytech.com/evil/setup.html

Reply 13 of 14, by Unknown_K

User metadata
Rank Oldbie
Rank
Oldbie

Buffer Underrun Protection came about when CDR drives jumped from SCSI to cheaper IDE which at the time didn't use DMA transfers by default. Since CPU utilization was high and early IDE drives were slow you needed to have a way to restart the burning process when the buffer ended up empty.

These days with regular desktop SATA drives doing 75MB/sec or much more with little CPU utilization I don't see the hardware being a problem with BR burning unless you are using a slow networked drive or doing some major HD intensive multitasking.

Collector of old computers, hardware, and software

Reply 14 of 14, by computergeek92

User metadata
Rank Oldbie
Rank
Oldbie
Unknown_K wrote:

Buffer Underrun Protection came about when CDR drives jumped from SCSI to cheaper IDE which at the time didn't use DMA transfers by default. Since CPU utilization was high and early IDE drives were slow you needed to have a way to restart the burning process when the buffer ended up empty.

These days with regular desktop SATA drives doing 75MB/sec or much more with little CPU utilization I don't see the hardware being a problem with BR burning unless you are using a slow networked drive or doing some major HD intensive multitasking.

I don't do any multitasking while burning discs on any computer.

Compared to IDE hard drives, will using Sata or Sata II versions lower my overall cpu utilization?

My mobo has a PCI-X slot which may perform well with those cards. (PCI-X 66MHz on an L440GX+ board)

Dedicated Windows 95 Aficionado for good reasons:
http://toastytech.com/evil/setup.html