VOGONS


First post, by Baoran

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Would it be possible to recognize if a sound card is pci or isa sound card from looking at the connectors from picture taken from back of a PC? I am thinking of buying an old pentium pc, but can't get any more info on it from the seller. I would rather get such pc for dos use than windows use so it would be nice to know beforehand if I need to get an extra isa sound card for it or if it comes already with one. If I would know it comes with isa sound card I would also be willing to offer more for it than if it has pci sound card.

Reply 2 of 12, by Baoran

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kixs wrote on 2020-10-12, 18:33:

Usually ISA slots are on the far side from keyboard connector.

Can you show us a photo?

Sure. I hope you don't mind that it is a very tiny photo.

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Reply 3 of 12, by imi

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if it has a gameport connector (which I mean... most cards of this era should have), then yes.

on ISA short side is usually down, on PCI short side is usually up.

edit: heh, that picture is very inconclusive.
sits exactly at a spot where it could easily be either ISA or PCI, as the third slot from below is very often PCI/ISA shared.
but according to my logic it should be a PCI card, as it seems to have the short side of the gameport connector facing up... though it is really hard to tell by that picture, could be down too.

Reply 6 of 12, by Baoran

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imi wrote on 2020-10-12, 18:52:
well a bunch of ISA SB cards had those too ^^ […]
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well a bunch of ISA SB cards had those too ^^

but I'd guess it's a runofthemill PCI SB like this:

640px-Creative_Technology_Sound_Blaster_CT4810-4200.jpg

Thanks. It is good to know that it doesn't have ISA sound card. ISA sound card would fit better for the time period that the pc is from, but perhaps the seller has switched it out or added sound card later.

Reply 7 of 12, by Baoran

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I think I will still buy it if I can get it cheap. I went to check my storage and I found more isa sound cards than I thought I had. Sound blasters CT1600, CT1770, CT2800 and CT4180. I also found 2 non-sound blaster cards called BTC-1831 Rev:B and ATC-6631. I hope at least some of the cards will work.

Reply 8 of 12, by Baoran

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imi wrote on 2020-10-12, 18:52:
well a bunch of ISA SB cards had those too ^^ […]
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well a bunch of ISA SB cards had those too ^^

but I'd guess it's a run-of-the-mill PCI SB like this:

640px-Creative_Technology_Sound_Blaster_CT4810-4200.jpg

I received the pc today and the sound card is exactly what you showed in the picture. It had a socket 7 motherboard with intel 430vx chipset and diamond riva 128 pci video card. It was cheap and it was sold as tested and working but I have not turned it on yet because I am still worried about these old power supplies and probably want to disconnect everything from the power supply and perhaps connect something else as load that I would not mind losing and then check voltages before reconnecting everything. The case looks really nice with Mhz display in it too. Lots of cobwebs inside so I don't think this computer has been opened for decades. Probably been built around 1997 considering all the parts.

Edit: Everything seems to be working fine. 1Gb and 853Mb hard drives installed. The video card is diamond viper V330 PCI with 4Mb of ram. Cpu is 100Mhz pentium and the PC has 80MB of ram. The motherboard unfortunately has a dallas battery but it seems to be working and keeping settings for now. If there won't be any retro use for this kind of computer at least I can keep the nice case and build something else inside.

Reply 10 of 12, by Baoran

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The system itself seems to be working, but I realized the sound card isn't in the device manager of win95 at all and there is no sound as a result. Does that generally mean that the sound card is broken?

Reply 11 of 12, by Grzyb

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PCI devices should be shown in device manager even if there's no drivers for them.
Also, many BIOSes list PCI devices.
So yes, there's something wrong there - but chances are it's just bad contact, cleaning the connector may help, or even just re-seating the card.

Reply 12 of 12, by Baoran

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Grzyb wrote on 2020-10-17, 05:33:

PCI devices should be shown in device manager even if there's no drivers for them.
Also, many BIOSes list PCI devices.
So yes, there's something wrong there - but chances are it's just bad contact, cleaning the connector may help, or even just re-seating the card.

If I remove the sound card and put it back when computer is turned on when the win95 boots it does ask for a driver disk for it, but if I skip that it does not appear in device manager still. Not even as yellow question mark. Anyone knows if drivers for the card exist for win95 that would fit on a 1.44MB floppy disk?