VOGONS


First post, by DarkVamp1976

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Hello,

I own a very special RETRO PC for playing my old games:

- AMD K6-3 400Mhz
- 256MB Ram
- 3Dfx Voodoo1 PCI
- 3Dfx Voodoo4 4500 PCI
- LG DVD ROM Drive
- Gravis Ultrasound PNP (8MB Ram)
- Creative SB AWE 32 (8MB Ram)
- Terratec EWS64 (32MB Ram)
- Roland MT32 Module
- Roland SC155 Sound Canvas Module
- All drives emulated via SD2IDE Adapters
- Windows 98SE and DOS 6.22

So I buy many games not yet in my list but also want to play them on the "Real" machine.
I know that GOG is holding 99% of the Single CD games on a file called game.gog which is a normal iso but only renamed.

I tried to rename the file and burn to CDR but only a very few are readable with DOS. Most are not. What do I wrong?

Greetings

Reply 2 of 9, by DosFreak

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Digital DOS games (GOG, Steam...) Retro PC Compatibility Sheet: We need your input!

DOSBox Compilation Guides
DosBox Feature Request Thread
PC Game Compatibility List
How To Ask Questions The Smart Way
Running DRM games offline

Reply 4 of 9, by Laaca

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Wow! Very impressive machine! I am also curious about hardware conflicts between your soundcards.
But to your question: Are you able to mount the CD ISOs in some program like Daemon Tools?
It shout mount many ISO formats and subformats and to give you some information about the ISO.
Don't forget that there exists more filesystems used on CDs. In DOS/Win98 is usable Joliet and ISO-9660 BUT other popular format called UDF is usualy not supported. (only with special driver)

Reply 5 of 9, by Zup

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DarkVamp1976 wrote on 2020-04-25, 11:30:

I know that GOG is holding 99% of the Single CD games on a file called game.gog which is a normal iso but only renamed.

I tried to rename the file and burn to CDR but only a very few are readable with DOS. Most are not. What do I wrong?

Those gog files are (mostly) not ISOs, and usually are not complete ISOs from the game. Most games fall in two categories:
- The ISO is a stub, with only the necessary data to bypass protection checks or contains only the data that is not installed on HDD (i.e.: Crusader: No regret installed the program but not the video files).
- The ISO is a stub, because the game uses CD audio and the audio tracks start at track 2 (i.e.: Heroes of Might and Magic 2).

So you're (probably) not doing anything wrong... the ISO didn't contains the data you expected. I'd recommend you to mount and inspect those ISO files before burning anything.

I have traveled across the universe and through the years to find Her.
Sometimes going all the way is just a start...

I'm selling some stuff!

Reply 6 of 9, by newtmonkey

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I'm honestly a bit disappointed with GOG in that it seems most of the DOS CD games they sell don't come with an actual working ISO. Most of the point and click adventure games use SCUMMVM, but even for games that use DOSBOX, I've found myself having to resort to archive.org to find actual ISOs for many of the games I've bought on GOG, just so that I could install them in PCEM, for instance. A lot of the games that have CD audio tracks are stubs like Zup mentioned above, where the actual tracks are compressed OGG files in a separate folder; I know you can recreate the ISO by converting the tracks to WAV and burning using the CUE file, but then you end up with worse audio quality than the original CD due to lossy compression to OGG format.

I know GOG's market is not necessarily people that want to play these games on actual period hardware, but it would be nice if they offered the original game ISO as an extra, for instance. It would be a great opportunity to not only provide these games in a format playable on modern hardware (via SCUMMVM and DOSBOX), but also to preserve these games in the format they were originally released (ISO, or even images of the original install diskettes!).

Reply 7 of 9, by appiah4

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I have, on several occasions, asked GOG to offer original game media (disks, cds, etc.) for games they sell as extra downloads. Nothing came of it. Feel free to knock on that door, though.

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Reply 8 of 9, by red_avatar

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This is why I no longer buy GOG games. I really appreciate the hard work they put into getting old games to work on modern systems but games that worked 5 years ago often don't work properly now on Windows 10 and if you're thinking of running them on original hardware, you quickly discover GOG gutted a ton of drivers that they figured modern systems wouldn't need but which stop it from running on original hardware.

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Reply 9 of 9, by The Serpent Rider

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but games that worked 5 years ago often don't work properly now on Windows 10

So you need retro PC for GOG releases, huehuehue.

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