VOGONS


Reply 160 of 178, by DracoNihil

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HunterZ wrote:

Looks like BASSMIDI has a Linux library too. Interesting that nobody uses FluidSynth on Windows or BASSMIDI on Linux.

I guess it would be best for people to pour effort into FluidSynth then.

Because BASS is proprietary and the last time I tried to get BASSMIDISynth (kode54's work) to run, it would absolutely refuse to open the sound device unless I terminated PulseAudio and gave it direct access to the DAC.

Looking into the issue this has been a huge problem with BASS for a long ass time and it's really stupid how BASS has no native PulseAudio support considering a ton of idiot-proof Linux distro's use it as the sound server... BASS refuses to even open a audio context even if you point it to the "pulse" ALSA device where as every other program under the sun that uses ALSA can run under PulseAudio via it's ALSA plugin...

You Linux guys can give PulseAudio all the BS whining you want, but it's unfortunately here to stay. Stop making up excuses and actually write code to use it natively.

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Reply 161 of 178, by HunterZ

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DracoNihil wrote:

it's really stupid how BASS has no native PulseAudio support considering a ton of idiot-proof Linux distro's use it as the sound server...

You Linux guys can give PulseAudio all the BS whining you want, but it's unfortunately here to stay. Stop making up excuses and actually write code to use it natively.

I went through the exact same thing with Wine a few years ago. By the time they got it sorted (if they ever really did), I had ended my Linux gaming experiment and went back to Windows.

Reply 162 of 178, by gdjacobs

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There were ways around that issue using the OSS proxy daemon. Still, a real pain in the ass. And Pulseaudio still sucks.

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Reply 165 of 178, by deemster

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Just noticed I didn't even add my Creative Wave Blaster 1 soundfont yet, although it is the soundfont I am the most proud of.

It is called Wave Blaster Archive, and it was my third attempt at sampling my Creative Wave Blaster 1 (CT1900) sound card. It turned out pretty large (more than gig), but sounds very much like the real thing.

A few samples using game midis: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLxDnrs … b9OioeVHD7VI3Vk

Download: http://1drv.ms/u/s!Ap-0SHCYq2AljA-sG1e4WBtrd989

Reply 166 of 178, by autoexecdotbat

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BTW, would anyone be interested in doing a yamaha tg100 soundfont? I've become rather interested in it ever since I learned it uses the same chip as the Sega Saturn.

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Reply 168 of 178, by Falcosoft

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gdjacobs wrote:

Is the TG100 GM compliant?

Yes, it seems to be GM compatible:
http://www.houseofsynth.com/hos-downloads/man … ence-Manual.pdf

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Reply 170 of 178, by Atomic Skull

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deemster wrote:

- Make the DB50XG soundfont actually XG compatible

This is not actually possible. You can't really emulate a DB50XG with just a soundfont, XG is way more than just a sound map. You'd have to emulate the ADSR envelope the resonant filter and the effects blocks as well otherwise XG MIDIs would not sound correct. The really good XG MIDI's make extensive use of these features (that's why most really good XG MIDIs have a huge block of SYSEX at the beginning). In fact most XG MIDIs composed for eg. an MU100 or MU2000 don't sound right on a DB50XG either because of the additional effects blocks that were added to the XG spec over the years. The effects blocks are why XG MIDIs have such good guitar sounds, there are effects presets for simulating a guitar amp that you can run the "dry" guitar samples though.

I've long wished that the Yamaha MU2000EX would be emulated (I mean an actual hardware emulation) like how the MT32 was. That's the only way you can get "real" XG emulation (or with a softsynth that fully supports the XG spec)

Reply 171 of 178, by Danfun64

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Sorry for bump, but it appears that links are down (at least the SC-55 one is).

Also, I'm curious how these are made (I E if everything was made from scratch or actually using Roland/Yamaha/Creative's copyrighted material). Also, you never put a license on these, yet the SC-55 one has been included in the GPL GZDoom. Of course, it appears that Deemster hasn't been here in more than a year, but was permission given or something?

Reply 172 of 178, by GiSWiG

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Go to this post Soundfonts that mimic old hardware (SC-55, DX50XG, AWE64 Gold) and click the 'deemster soundfonts' link

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Reply 174 of 178, by mmontag

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Atomic Skull wrote:

I've long wished that the Yamaha MU2000EX would be emulated (I mean an actual hardware emulation) like how the MT32 was. That's the only way you can get "real" XG emulation (or with a softsynth that fully supports the XG spec)

Same here.

Hardware emulation seems pretty farfetched, but maybe you could get close just by implementing all the effects blocks in a MIDI synth.

Then again, how many MIDIs were ever composed for the MU1000/2000? How can it really be enjoyed?

When pushed to its limit, XG MIDI almost takes on the character of a tracker/DAW format. Which is cool if you ask me, since it's an open standard.

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