VOGONS


Reply 20 of 27, by 386SX

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Maybe I was not lucky with the ones I got but I had problems with some sata to ide adapters. One ended with melted psu wires... other two I tried got broken without reasons. I think that the whole "direct connection" solution without some basic case support for the weight the whole solution have plus "not the best soldering" is often a problem.

Last edited by 386SX on 2016-08-11, 14:42. Edited 1 time in total.

Reply 21 of 27, by Jo22

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You're not alone with this. I once had the same issue as you. I found out that a flashlight (a pocket lamp) can be helpful here:
Hold it under the PCB and you'll see all traces clearly! Then, just keep looking for short circuits. They are usally near the connectors or chips..

The last SATA /IDE converter I used was okay, though. I bought it for my old Mac and it worked. It was one of the "one way" models, without a switch.
It simply attaches to the SATA HDD. But I can't say whether this is a good model or not, 'cause I'm a newbie at this, afterall. The chip's name is JM20330.

I also attached two pix for you, maybe they can be helpful (sorry for the bad quality 🙁 ).

Attachments

  • sataide1.jpg
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    sataide1.jpg
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    30.41 KiB
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    705 views
    File comment
    IDE/SATA converter (front)
    File license
    Fair use/fair dealing exception
  • sataide2.jpg
    Filename
    sataide2.jpg
    File size
    29.07 KiB
    Views
    705 views
    File comment
    IDE/SATA converter (back)
    File license
    Fair use/fair dealing exception

"Time, it seems, doesn't flow. For some it's fast, for some it's slow.
In what to one race is no time at all, another race can rise and fall..." - The Minstrel

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Reply 22 of 27, by gdjacobs

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I did some touching up with my adapter before installation, but it's been solid since then.

All hail the Great Capacitor Brand Finder

Reply 23 of 27, by Orkay

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For hard drives larger than 8GB, a Promise Ultra33 PCI hard drive controller works well in 486 and Pentium machines. Faster variants may work too, but Ultra33 is all I have. Keep in mind that you'll still be limited to 128GB or whatever the card specifies, and you should also remember to install the controller's drivers for optimal performance, or to use in Windows NT.

The Ultra33 card also allowed my 486 to work with a CF card, something not all onboard IDE controllers will cooperate with.

Reply 24 of 27, by CkRtech

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Orkay wrote:

The Ultra33 card also allowed my 486 to work with a CF card, something not all onboard IDE controllers will cooperate with.

Interesting. I picked up a CF IDE (Startech) reader in 2010, and my Pentium 100 cannot cold boot with it. I always have to boot and immediately press reset in order to not have it hang when listing the IDE devices during POST.

Displaced Gamers (YouTube) - DOS Gaming Aspect Ratio - 320x200 || The History of 240p || Dithering on the Sega Genesis with Composite Video

Reply 25 of 27, by Radical Vision

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Im wondering how much faster will become my 462 machine using sata HDD or even an SSD, but don`t have other SSD then mine on main pc...
From what i have heard old computers can become fast as hell with SSD, bcuz no matter the age and generation of the hardware the HDD will be always the slowest part....

Mah systems retro, old, newer (Radical stuff)
W3680 4.5/ GA-x58 UD7/ R9 280x
K7 2.6/ NF7-S/ HD3850
IBM x2 P3 933/ GA-6VXD7/ Voodoo V 5.5K
Cmq P2 450/ GA-BX2000/ V2 SLI
IBM PC365
Cmq DeskPRO 486/33
IBM PS/2 Model 56
SPS IntelleXT 8088

Reply 26 of 27, by gdjacobs

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Even a modern mechanical SATA HDD via an ATA adapter offers significant performance improvements due to improved seek times and high transfer rates.

All hail the Great Capacitor Brand Finder

Reply 27 of 27, by lordmogul

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How much will such an old machine benefit at all.
More than ATA-66 would be ludicrus compared to the rest of bus speeds inside the system.
Nothing against using what is around.
There basically a couple of solutions:

  • Native IDE HDDs (Supported natively, but drives are loud, usually used, not the fastest and old, which bring certains risks with failure)
  • SATA HDDs with an adapter (No native support, might bring incompatability. Usually very fast. Issues with big drives >4 GiB/>32 GiB/>128 GiB)
  • CF cards (Runs natively through IDE adapters, limited write cycles, usually very fast response and good transfer rates)
  • Other flash cards (Would need an adapter to IDE, limited write cycles, very fast response and usually good transfer rates)

In he end, it depends on the use.

  • On DOS I'd think native IDE or CF cards should be the easiest. Few write cycles ensure the longevity of the flash cells, and small drives are easy to find.
  • For Windows 9x I'd go with either type of hard drive. the IDE drives run natively and the SATA drives will need an adapter. But both shoud run fine, especially when limited to smaller storage. And the systems usually actually benefit from such fast drives.

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