VOGONS


First post, by user33331

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Hello
How to know when processor is soldered or just stuck to socket 7 ?
I have a socket 7 motherboard 1998:
1.) Motherboard chipset = OPTi 82C557M Viper-N+
2.) Processor = K6/233ADZ* =233MHz AMD Littlefoot

There is no lever on the socket 7 it is on a black plastic base with metallic grey steel colored outputs.
-> I tried to pull out the processor with only a light force but it did not move so I gave up... How to know if it is soldered to the black plastic base or just stuck and jammed badly for being there 20 years ?
-> What processors are typically soldered ?
-> If stuck is there a tool to help me remove it easier and evenly without leaving marks to the plastic ?

- Is processor upgrading possible if the motherboard has one of those socket 7: dip switch box= 5 small dip switches.

Reply 1 of 13, by Cyberdyne

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Why do you not have the energy to take a Picture.

I am aroused about any X86 motherboard that has full functional ISA slot. I think i have problem. Not really into that original (Turbo) XT,286,386 and CGA/EGA stuff. So just a DOS nut.

Reply 4 of 13, by Malvineous

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It's possible for a processor to be pushed into a socket, this could look like there's a black plastic holder between the CPU and the motherboard. It's also possible for the CPU to be soldered into the motherboard, in this case there could be a spacer which will look like there's a black plastic holder between the CPU and the motherboard. So without detailed (sharply focused) photos, especially ones edge on to the socket, all we can say is yes it could be socketed, and yes it could be soldered. I'm not sure what you mean by the plastic holder having "outputs" so again a photo would help. For socket 7 it's probably socketed, but then I've never seen a socket 7 system that didn't have a ZIF socket so again we'd need photos before we can even begin to guess. Hopefully that explains why everyone is asking for photos.

Which processors are typically soldered? Any of them can be, it just depends on whether the manufacturer of the motherboard wanted to cut costs.

Is there a tool to remove them? I've only seen one for removing Intel 486 CPUs. Normally you use a screwdriver and live with the resulting marks you get in the socket.

Is processor upgrading possible? You have to look in the motherboard manual. Motherboards are designed to work with a range of CPUs, so if the CPU you already have is at the bottom of that range then you can replace it with a faster one, but if it's at the top of the range supported by the board then you can only replace it with a slower one. Same situation as with a modern PC.

Reply 5 of 13, by user33331

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It just looks like this. See attached sketch.
Small metallic steel pipes in between plastic socket and processor.
No lever.
http://www.x86-guide.com/Photos/Grandes/1/AMD … %20-%20haut.jpg
Image:

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Reply 6 of 13, by tayyare

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As far as I can tell, this probably is a LIF (low insertion force) socket.

Actually, I'm at a loss, since I never seen them used in motherboards anything for newer than a 486. Starting from Socket 3 everything was ZIF (zero insertion force. i.e. sockets with levers), or this is what I experineced during the days.

Assuming the bottom dark gray thing in there is a socket, I can safely assume that it is not soldered. A soldered CPU is almost always soldered dirctly on to the board, soldering means saving the price of a socket, so using a socket and soldering on top of it would be meaningless.

If you want to remove a chip from a LIF socket, you can use standrad L shaped slot covers as a lever. You need to pry the chip from the corners, one at a time and a little bit every time, until it become loose.

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Reply 7 of 13, by JidaiGeki

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Does your motherboard look anything like this?

viper.jpg
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But really, a photo of what you actually have would help a lot. And why are you trying to take off the CPU - does the computer not work?

Edit: OK you can use something like this to remove it

http://www.vogonswiki.com/images/1/14/Intel_C … emoval_tool.jpg

But they tend to be for socket 3.

Last edited by JidaiGeki on 2018-03-13, 23:04. Edited 3 times in total.

Reply 9 of 13, by dionb

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I've seen LIF sockets on some industrial So5/7 SBC boards, so not impossible. But to join the chorus: pics!

Not so much for the actual CPU (we'll take your word for it you don't see any more than the CPU with something plastic under it) but to identify the rest of the situation/board. That might tell us *a lot* more about what you can and can't remove - and why.

Reply 10 of 13, by user33331

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Ok. Here I disassembled the PC again.
I was at work so that is why unable to send photos earlier.

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Reply 12 of 13, by alvaro84

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dionb wrote:

I've seen LIF sockets on some industrial So5/7 SBC boards, so not impossible.

And in laptops.

Shame on us, doomed from the start
May God have mercy on our dirty little hearts

Reply 13 of 13, by Malvineous

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That's much more helpful! Thanks for the clear photo. Because those sockets have no locking mechanism and the CPU is held in by friction, you can often need quite a bit of force to lever them out, even if they are called "low insertion force" sockets. The suggestion of tayyare's to use a slot cover bracket to lever them out is a good one, and I'd also like to repeat how important it is to lever them out evenly. If you lift up one side too much further than the others, you will bend the pins. So lift up each side by 1mm or less at a time, and work your way all around the chip over and over until it comes out. It can be a bit of a lengthy process, which is why the more common ZIF sockets are so much more popular!