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Reply 20 of 38, by Doornkaat

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mockingbird wrote on 2021-05-14, 15:01:

This adapter is still being produced and can be used with an ordinary slotket:

I believe it requires more soldering than just modding the CPU does though. On the other hand it looks more professional than a bodge wire on the CPU. 😅

Reply 21 of 38, by mothergoose729

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Doornkaat wrote on 2021-05-14, 15:36:
mockingbird wrote on 2021-05-14, 15:01:

This adapter is still being produced and can be used with an ordinary slotket:

I believe it requires more soldering than just modding the CPU does though. On the other hand it looks more professional than a bodge wire on the CPU. 😅

It also has the voltage regulators on the PCB package, but yeah, that was my thought too. That is a lot of fine point soldering. I would be intimidated to try it.

Reply 22 of 38, by Doornkaat

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mothergoose729 wrote on 2021-05-14, 15:41:
Doornkaat wrote on 2021-05-14, 15:36:
mockingbird wrote on 2021-05-14, 15:01:

This adapter is still being produced and can be used with an ordinary slotket:

I believe it requires more soldering than just modding the CPU does though. On the other hand it looks more professional than a bodge wire on the CPU. 😅

It also has the voltage regulators on the PCB package, but yeah, that was my thought too. That is a lot of fine point soldering. I would be intimidated to try it.

There are voltage regulators on that tiny PCB?

Reply 23 of 38, by mothergoose729

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Doornkaat wrote on 2021-05-14, 16:09:
mothergoose729 wrote on 2021-05-14, 15:41:
Doornkaat wrote on 2021-05-14, 15:36:

I believe it requires more soldering than just modding the CPU does though. On the other hand it looks more professional than a bodge wire on the CPU. 😅

It also has the voltage regulators on the PCB package, but yeah, that was my thought too. That is a lot of fine point soldering. I would be intimidated to try it.

There are voltage regulators on that tiny PCB?

Maybe I am using the wrong term, but I think that is what smds are for in the center.

Reply 24 of 38, by Doornkaat

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mothergoose729 wrote on 2021-05-14, 16:42:

Maybe I am using the wrong term, but I think that is what smds are for in the center.

As far as I can tell there are three resistors used in relocating signal pins, one optional solder blob to have the FSB configured for 100MHz and one or two blobs for 1.5V/1.45V selection. Those last two appear to be needed only if you remove VID pins for easier soldering I believe.
The PCB is purely passive, there are no regulators visible.
The brown SMDs in the very center are ceramic capacitors and part of the CPU package.

Reply 25 of 38, by Scythifuge

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Paadam wrote on 2021-05-14, 06:04:

If your P2B supports coppermines then you can modify pretty much any slotket to work with Tualatin.
Just do it properly, most guides are not correct. Use this guide and you are good: http://www.rom.by/articles/S370/_english_index.htm

Thank you!

Oetker wrote on 2021-05-14, 06:22:

Agreed, the most important item is the board's VRM, if that supports Coppermine CPUs a Tualatin is safe to use. You will still need to get a modded CPU or socket/slotket and your bios must not be too strict.

I will have to do some research.

dionb wrote on 2021-05-14, 13:38:

I don't see the P2B revision listed. That's key here. 1.12 and later support CuMine (some 1.10 supposedly also do, but definitely not all), in that case you just need a modded slocket. If not, you need a slocket with built-in VRM - unobtainium like the PL-IP3/T

So: which is it?

Good question!

Skyscraper wrote on 2021-05-14, 14:05:

Thank you!

mockingbird wrote on 2021-05-14, 15:01:

This adapter is still being produced and can be used with an ordinary slotket:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/283583586110

ebay_b.jpg

Good to know! Thank you!

PARKE wrote on 2021-05-14, 15:34:
Scythifuge wrote on 2021-05-13, 18:51:

My P2B has a P3 550 installed, though I would like to upgrade it to a P3 1.4Ghz, especially now that I have a 512mb ram stick on the way.

512mb RAM sticks are not supported on 440BX motherboards. At best they are addressed as 256mb.

Ugh... I didn't know that! Maybe I'll buy x3 256mb ram sticks and turn one stick into a RAM drive. I read that there are programs that can see the ram that Win98 can't see and address. If not, then I can get x2 256mb sticks. They seem cheap enough. I can save the 512mb stick for another board that may come with a 1.4GFhz P3 Tualatin...

Reply 26 of 38, by dionb

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Scythifuge wrote on 2021-05-14, 18:04:

[...]

dionb wrote on 2021-05-14, 13:38:

I don't see the P2B revision listed. That's key here. 1.12 and later support CuMine (some 1.10 supposedly also do, but definitely not all), in that case you just need a modded slocket. If not, you need a slocket with built-in VRM - unobtainium like the PL-IP3/T

So: which is it?

Good question!

It's printed on the PCB...

[...]

PARKE wrote on 2021-05-14, 15:34:

512mb RAM sticks are not supported on 440BX motherboards. At best they are addressed as 256mb.

Ugh... I didn't know that! Maybe I'll buy x3 256mb ram sticks and turn one stick into a RAM drive. I read that there are programs that can see the ram that Win98 can't see and address. If not, then I can get x2 256mb sticks. They seem cheap enough. I can save the 512mb stick for another board that may come with a 1.4GFhz P3 Tualatin...

Note that it's not the DIMM size that's the problem but the chip density. 512MB SDR-SDRAM DIMMs have 16 chips of 256Mb each. i440BX's memory controller can handle max 128Mb chips. So if you want to max the memory, you need 256MB DIMMs with 16 128Mb chips. If you get 256MB DIMMs with 8 256Mb chips, they will only be utilized as 128MB DIMMs.

Last edited by dionb on 2021-05-14, 22:04. Edited 1 time in total.

Reply 27 of 38, by Scythifuge

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dionb wrote on 2021-05-14, 19:09:
It's printed on the PCB... […]
Show full quote
Scythifuge wrote on 2021-05-14, 18:04:

[...]

dionb wrote on 2021-05-14, 13:38:

I don't see the P2B revision listed. That's key here. 1.12 and later support CuMine (some 1.10 supposedly also do, but definitely not all), in that case you just need a modded slocket. If not, you need a slocket with built-in VRM - unobtainium like the PL-IP3/T

So: which is it?

Good question!

It's printed on the PCB...

[...]

PARKE wrote on 2021-05-14, 15:34:

512mb RAM sticks are not supported on 440BX motherboards. At best they are addressed as 256mb.

Ugh... I didn't know that! Maybe I'll buy x3 256mb ram sticks and turn one stick into a RAM drive. I read that there are programs that can see the ram that Win98 can't see and address. If not, then I can get x2 256mb sticks. They seem cheap enough. I can save the 512mb stick for another board that may come with a 1.4GFhz P3 Tualatin...

Note that it's not the DIMM size that's the problem but the chip density. 512MB SDR-SDRAM DIMMs have 16 chips of 256Mb each. i440BX's memory controller can handle max 129Mb chips. So if you want to max the memory, you need 256MB DIMMs with 16 128Mb chips. If you get 256MB DIMMs with 8 256Mb chips, they will only be utilized as 128MB DIMMs.

Thank you! That is very helpful.

Reply 29 of 38, by pentiumspeed

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This is not the point.

The point is the other posters are saying is, needs low density DIMMs for BX chipset. Anything more than 128MB per 8 chips is not supported, beyond that is considered high density.

In other word, you can have: 128MB DIMM with 8 chips that is on one side, or 256MB with 16 chips total (that covers both sides of DIMM) is supported for BX. You need to be careful buying and insist on checking auction pictures of same 256MB stick to see that both sides of chips are present. Micron, Hynix, Samsung, Infineon and Crucial are good brands. PC100 or PC133 are fine, but on BX, will run at PC100, no problem.

Expect to pay little more. Never from Chinese seller.

Example:

https://www.ebay.ca/itm/164858713327?hash=ite … EsAAOSw~g1gmUqU

Cheers,

Great Northern aka Canada.

Reply 30 of 38, by darry

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pentiumspeed wrote on 2021-05-18, 02:20:
This is not the point. […]
Show full quote

This is not the point.

The point is the other posters are saying is, needs low density DIMMs for BX chipset. Anything more than 128MB per 8 chips is not supported, beyond that is considered high density.

In other word, you can have: 128MB DIMM with 8 chips that is on one side, or 256MB with 16 chips total (that covers both sides of DIMM) is supported for BX. You need to be careful buying and insist on checking auction pictures of same 256MB stick to see that both sides of chips are present. Micron, Hynix, Samsung, Infineon and Crucial are good brands. PC100 or PC133 are fine, but on BX, will run at PC100, no problem.

Expect to pay little more. Never from Chinese seller.

Example:

https://www.ebay.ca/itm/164858713327?hash=ite … EsAAOSw~g1gmUqU

Cheers,

Another option is to use some 512MB DIMMs . They will typically run well but be detected at half capacity (256MB) each . See 440BX and 512MB DIMMs used at half capacity. Safe? This may be easier than trying to hunt down 256MB DIMMs that use low density chips .

EDIT : If you want to get proper 256MB DIMMs that will be detected as 256MB in a 440BX board, I suggest you read for all the details https://web.archive.org/web/20180103032407/ht … ram_bx_faq.html .

Reply 31 of 38, by Scythifuge

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pentiumspeed wrote on 2021-05-18, 02:20:
This is not the point. […]
Show full quote

This is not the point.

The point is the other posters are saying is, needs low density DIMMs for BX chipset. Anything more than 128MB per 8 chips is not supported, beyond that is considered high density.

In other word, you can have: 128MB DIMM with 8 chips that is on one side, or 256MB with 16 chips total (that covers both sides of DIMM) is supported for BX. You need to be careful buying and insist on checking auction pictures of same 256MB stick to see that both sides of chips are present. Micron, Hynix, Samsung, Infineon and Crucial are good brands. PC100 or PC133 are fine, but on BX, will run at PC100, no problem.

Expect to pay little more. Never from Chinese seller.

Example:

https://www.ebay.ca/itm/164858713327?hash=ite … EsAAOSw~g1gmUqU

Cheers,

Thank you for the link & info, much appreciated!

Reply 32 of 38, by Scythifuge

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darry wrote on 2021-05-18, 02:54:
pentiumspeed wrote on 2021-05-18, 02:20:
This is not the point. […]
Show full quote

This is not the point.

The point is the other posters are saying is, needs low density DIMMs for BX chipset. Anything more than 128MB per 8 chips is not supported, beyond that is considered high density.

In other word, you can have: 128MB DIMM with 8 chips that is on one side, or 256MB with 16 chips total (that covers both sides of DIMM) is supported for BX. You need to be careful buying and insist on checking auction pictures of same 256MB stick to see that both sides of chips are present. Micron, Hynix, Samsung, Infineon and Crucial are good brands. PC100 or PC133 are fine, but on BX, will run at PC100, no problem.

Expect to pay little more. Never from Chinese seller.

Example:

https://www.ebay.ca/itm/164858713327?hash=ite … EsAAOSw~g1gmUqU

Cheers,

Another option is to use some 512MB DIMMs . They will typically run well but be detected at half capacity (256MB) each . See 440BX and 512MB DIMMs used at half capacity. Safe? This may be easier than trying to hunt down 256MB DIMMs that use low density chips .

EDIT : If you want to get proper 256MB DIMMs that will be detected as 256MB in a 440BX board, I suggest you read for all the details https://web.archive.org/web/20180103032407/ht … ram_bx_faq.html .

Running at half capacity was what I was thinking. Running two at half capacity but that would equal 512mb, at least until I found what I am looking for, and once I did, I would have the 512mb sticks for a separate Tualatin build.

Reply 34 of 38, by Skyscraper

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mockingbird wrote on 2021-10-31, 04:26:

Has anyone here successfully run a Tualatin on a P2B (Read: vanilla P2B pr P2B-S)?

I am getting lockups with my lin-lin adapter. The Korean adapter didn't work at all.

Yes a P3-1400S @ 1400 on a vanilla P2B first retail revision (1.02) . This revision has a clock generator with the 1/4 PCI-divider.

This was with the "Korean adapter" and a MSI "MS6905 Master" -slotket jumpered for 1.8V as the P2B 1.02 has a VRM circuit that can't handle lower voltage. The real voltage with drop and droop ended up beeing <1.7V. Stability was good as far as I can remember.

Cooling the motherboard VRMs is probably a good idea when running Tualatins @1.8V (and it's questionable if it's a good idea at all).

New PC: i9 12900K @5GHz all cores @1.2v. MSI PRO Z690-A. 32GB DDR4 3600 CL14. 3070Ti.
Old PC: Dual Xeon X5690@4.6GHz, EVGA SR-2, 48GB DDR3R@2000MHz, Intel X25-M. GTX 980ti.
Older PC: K6-3+ 400@600MHz, PC-Chips M577, 256MB SDRAM, AWE64, Voodoo Banshee.

Reply 35 of 38, by mockingbird

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Skyscraper wrote on 2021-10-31, 06:03:

Yes a P3-1400S @ 1400 on a vanilla P2B first retail revision (1.02) . This revision has a clock generator with the 1/4 PCI-divider.

This was with the "Korean adapter" and a MSI "MS6905 Master" -slotket jumpered for 1.8V as the P2B 1.02 has a VRM circuit that can't handle lower voltage. The real voltage with drop and droop ended up beeing <1.7V. Stability was good as far as I can remember.

Cooling the motherboard VRMs is probably a good idea when running Tualatins @1.8V (and it's questionable if it's a good idea at all).

I replaced both the voltage chip and the clock chip so I can do under 1.6V (and this is verified in the BIOS hardware monitoring). I'm begining to suspect that the clock chip I used is causing all my grief. It is dividing the clocks properly, as far as I can tell, but I am getting weird issues.

Can you do a quick sanity check for me please? Can you run this old attached memtest on your P2B?

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Reply 36 of 38, by Skyscraper

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mockingbird wrote on 2021-10-31, 18:14:

Can you do a quick sanity check for me please? Can you run this old attached memtest on your P2B?

Sorry for the late reply, I'm not very active here these days.

I moved houses this summer and most of my stuff is still unpacked or in varying states of disorder.

When I happen to find the P2B board I can run the memtest, does it have to be with the Tualatin CPU?

New PC: i9 12900K @5GHz all cores @1.2v. MSI PRO Z690-A. 32GB DDR4 3600 CL14. 3070Ti.
Old PC: Dual Xeon X5690@4.6GHz, EVGA SR-2, 48GB DDR3R@2000MHz, Intel X25-M. GTX 980ti.
Older PC: K6-3+ 400@600MHz, PC-Chips M577, 256MB SDRAM, AWE64, Voodoo Banshee.

Reply 37 of 38, by y2k se

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mockingbird wrote on 2021-10-31, 04:26:

Has anyone here successfully run a Tualatin on a P2B (Read: vanilla P2B pr P2B-S)?

Yes. Revision P2B v1.10, PL-IP3/T slocket and a Tualatin Celeron 1.4. Mine required manually patching the BIOS for the CPU stepping.

Tualatin Celeron 1.4, ASUS P2B, 512 MB, GeForce 3 Ti 200, Voodoo2 SLI, AWE64, WD 80GB SE HDD, Dell 2007FP

Reply 38 of 38, by mockingbird

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Skyscraper wrote on 2021-12-21, 18:30:

When I happen to find the P2B board I can run the memtest, does it have to be with the Tualatin CPU?

Preferably, please.

y2k se wrote on 2021-12-21, 20:49:

Yes. Revision P2B v1.10, PL-IP3/T slocket and a Tualatin Celeron 1.4. Mine required manually patching the BIOS for the CPU stepping.

I have an authentic ICS9250 clockgen on the way... I think mine was fake and causing all my problems.

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