VOGONS


First post, by Rikintosh

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I have some laptop screens from the 90's (10" to 13"), which work fine, but the polarizing film has spoiled (it looks like a kind of moisture), I removed it from some screens, and saw that the lcd itself is perfect (I get it view the image using the 3d glasses that came with my TV), but the colors and contrast are not right with the TV glasses. My idea was to simply remove the damaged film, buy a new film (from TV) and install it, but I can see that they are classified by angle (zero degrees, 45 degrees, 90 degrees).

I'm afraid to buy the film, and get the result I get with the 3d glasses (whose colors don't show correctly).

My doubts:
- Has anyone changed the polarizing lcd film from the 90s?
- DSTN screens use the same film, or do they use a specific film?
- Overall, how many degrees did you get the image on your screens?

10 years ago I saw this problem for the first time on a third party laptop, I thought it was some damage caused by misuse, but nowadays they are appearing for sale, many laptops with this problem, does anyone know what causes it? I have very old laptops here that didn't develop this problem. This has been good for me, because because of this defect (which most people in my country think is a damaged screen), I can get my beloved laptops at affordable prices.

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Take a look at my retro blog: https://rikintosh.blogspot.com/
My Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfRUbxkBmEihBEkIK32Hilg

Reply 1 of 7, by retardware

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Might it be an issue of condensing humidity getting trapped?
Maybe an idea could be trying/using polarizers from damaged LCD TVs that got dumped on the streets?

Reply 2 of 7, by cyclone3d

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I bought a matte screen protector for a large tablet and cut it to size for one of my Sony laptops that had that same issue.

Yamaha YMF modified setupds and drivers
Yamaha XG resource repository - updated November 27, 2018
Yamaha YMF7x4 Guide
AW744L II - YMF744 - AOpen Cobra Sound Card - Install SB-Link Header

Reply 3 of 7, by Byrd

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No, but I'm interested and agree sourcing the polarizing film from an old LCD TV would be the most cost effective method.

Removing the existing film would be tricky - I'd prewarm the panel (something like a 3D printer heated bed would be good) before touching and peeling the old film off

Reply 4 of 7, by Thermalwrong

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These guys swap out polarisers all day - quite good to watch to get an idea of the process: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCgdAYkEgXnyB … bV0Sl3WQ/videos
Being in England, it's not something I've seen much of yet, though I have seen the beginnings of this happening on maybe one of my laptops? When I learned about 'vinegar syndrome' I took all the laptops out of the storage box and let them air out on shelves instead.

It seems to happen to Sony laptops with greatest frequency? But on a long enough timeline, it should happen to every LCD, similar to what can happen to old glass CRT tubes that aren't stored well. Thankfully, much safer to swap a polariser than fix the cover on a glass CRT that could implode/explode if hit the wrong way.

This guy (who I think posts on here) has a good video on how to remove and replace the polariser on an old laptop TFT (oh, actually DSTN): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oeVmiQJXtck
Be careful to keep a low angle and avoid putting pressure on specific points, use the side of your hand rather than your fingers when pulling the polariser. That first youtube channel, those guys technique is impressive.

Long ago, I read of people on the hardOCP removing polarisers by leaving a wet towel on the polariser for a while to soften it / the glue. I'm glad I haven't had to try that yet.

Reply 5 of 7, by cyclone3d

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The wet towel or rather, wet paper towel method works great on the Sony laptop screens. The process does take a few days though and I had to re-wet the paper towels a few times. Trick is to just make the paper towel moist and then leve it on there. It is pretty easy to tell when you can remove some of the film. It gets really soft.

Yamaha YMF modified setupds and drivers
Yamaha XG resource repository - updated November 27, 2018
Yamaha YMF7x4 Guide
AW744L II - YMF744 - AOpen Cobra Sound Card - Install SB-Link Header

Reply 6 of 7, by Thermalwrong

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Got some more here, I did a lot of research after I learned what Vinegar Syndrome was and translated subtitles work well enough to watch japanese videos:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zbrW7uUYpkw (in english!)
shows the process well: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m35KRGdVvCs
Another good one - that roller seems to make a difference. Even repairs the internal polariser: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d2P8-sVGnOw

Reply 7 of 7, by Rikintosh

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yes, Vinegar Syndrome is the name then! I have a box of 12 laptops with Vinegar Syndrome screens, and although the first thing I noticed was the peculiar strong odor coming from the defective screens, I was intrigued, now it all makes sense.

I usually use the wet towels, and once I get one end out, I wrap it in a pvc pipe, and just spin it, and then it comes off easily without having to put any force on the panel.

The boring part is removing the glue residues, I have to use isopropyl alcohol and a razor. I know there is a chemical that easily dissolves this glue, it comes in a brown glass bottle that looks like a syrup, but I don't know its name.

I've already tried to reuse a film taken from another canvas, but it doesn't work, as soon as you remove it, it will curl up, and it will be full of glue residue, in addition to being opaque.

I ordered a zero degrees 32 inch tv film for a reasonable price. I bought a size many times bigger, because if the viewing angle is different, I will be able to rotate the film and cut it to the correct angle.

In the past I've done something very similar over and over again: I took apart old 4:3 monitors that had a matte screen, and I did this process to just remove the matte film (keeping the polarizer in place) to get a 4:3 monitor with bright screen. This also improved the contrast and the "yellow light instead of white" feel that the monitor produced.

Take a look at my retro blog: https://rikintosh.blogspot.com/
My Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfRUbxkBmEihBEkIK32Hilg