VOGONS


Bought these (retro) hardware today

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Reply 36120 of 37167, by verysaving

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Xicor wrote on 2020-09-22, 11:57:
Today I received a couple of curious vintage hardware, the first was a bit of a gamble. From the layout it looks like a graphics […]
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Today I received a couple of curious vintage hardware, the first was a bit of a gamble. From the layout it looks like a graphics adaptor, but the DA-15 connector does not corroborate. With little info on the silkscreen and labels I became intrigued by this little 8 bit isa card. Puled the trigger on it, and now I have a more clear picture, the 28 in ic (U1) is a 6264 static ram. The logo on the main ic and pcb, is from a company called "Video Associates Labs". I now think that this thing is MDA for a CNC machine, probably reusable on a xt class pc.

isaCard.jpg

The second piece of vintage hardware is an IBM classic, the iconic IBM PS/1 model 2011 ( @ least for me ) :

IBM_2011.jpg

The special thing about this machine is a rare PS/1 sound card, besides being a cute little box :

IBM_2011_Open.jpg

IBM_2011_SoundCard.jpg

@ last but not the least, a book about the ISA interface, this is a good reference book from 1995, so a bit late for the lifespan of the ISA "standard", and that makes it a very thorough book:

ISA_book.jpg

The first card reminds me a similar one I have
It was an AS/400 interface for PC.

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Reply 36121 of 37167, by Xicor

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verysaving wrote on 2020-09-23, 00:58:
Xicor wrote on 2020-09-22, 11:57:
Today I received a couple of curious vintage hardware, the first was a bit of a gamble. From the layout it looks like a graphics […]
Show full quote

Today I received a couple of curious vintage hardware, the first was a bit of a gamble. From the layout it looks like a graphics adaptor, but the DA-15 connector does not corroborate. With little info on the silkscreen and labels I became intrigued by this little 8 bit isa card. Puled the trigger on it, and now I have a more clear picture, the 28 in ic (U1) is a 6264 static ram. The logo on the main ic and pcb, is from a company called "Video Associates Labs". I now think that this thing is MDA for a CNC machine, probably reusable on a xt class pc.

isaCard.jpg

The second piece of vintage hardware is an IBM classic, the iconic IBM PS/1 model 2011 ( @ least for me ) :

IBM_2011.jpg

The special thing about this machine is a rare PS/1 sound card, besides being a cute little box :

IBM_2011_Open.jpg

IBM_2011_SoundCard.jpg

@ last but not the least, a book about the ISA interface, this is a good reference book from 1995, so a bit late for the lifespan of the ISA "standard", and that makes it a very thorough book:

ISA_book.jpg

The first card reminds me a similar one I have
It was an AS/400 interface for PC.

Thanks for the hint, it really is an interface for AS/400, or better yet an emulation car for IBM 5250 terminal, so that you could run your pc as terminal for IBM System/34 up to AS/400. I'm lacking the twinaxial connector, and the funny thing is that the connector is gender reversed from all the similar cards, probably so that the company that made this things may have a new revenue just selling the replacement cables.

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Reply 36123 of 37167, by brt02

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New in box Asus PCH-DL. Intel 875P/6300ESB based dual socket 604 board

MJWIrrll.jpg

Already have a PC-DL, but saw this come up and could not help myself.

Intel OR840 | 2x Pentium 3 1GHz - 1GB PC800 RDRAM - ATI Radeon 9800 Pro -Audigy 2ZS - W98/W2K
Asus PC-DL | 2x Xeon 3.06GHz @ 3.6GHz - 2GB PC3200 - Nvidia Geforce 6800 XT- WXP

Reply 36124 of 37167, by Aublak

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So I've been drinking the 486 Koolaid lately and I decided I wanted to get into it. I don't really have a history with the 486 and yet here I am. I believe my first (family) computer was a Packard Bell with an early Pentium. Well maybe one of those school computers were likely a 386/486.

Anyways I bought this 486 mainboard (Epox GXA486SPM) along with a DX2, a Am5x86, and some unknown ram. Its missing it eprom chip, but I have a programmer arriving today. So we'll see how that goes.

Then I bought an entire 386sx computer because I just wanted the case. So now I guess I have a 386 as well. I don't even know how to get started with this, but I guess I'll figure it out as I go along.

The main thing I'm worried about is that PSU. I wouldn't know how to check it for safety.

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    Am I supposed to cut this off if I want to remove the PSU from the case?
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    The varta battery looks like shit but it doesn't look like its ruined anything around it.
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Reply 36125 of 37167, by MMaximus

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Don't cut the wires!! From the looks of it you need to remove the whole front bezel of the case first. Then you will have access to two screws that will enable you to remove the PSU switch from the case. The PSU switch is attached to the PSU cables and the black adhesive tape is there for a reason, so that there's no wire exposed (these carry mains voltage). Leave it as it is.

However the whole thing looks quite clean to me, I'm not sure you need to remove the PSU from the case...

Reply 36126 of 37167, by wiretap

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The black tape or heatshrink could also be hiding some blade style connectors that can be easily removed.

Circuit Board Repair Manuals
Turbo Display Project
Dual Socket 8 Project

Reply 36127 of 37167, by pentiumspeed

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Not a tape. This is thick wall heat shrink tubing. Soldered, don't mess with this, just unscrew the switch from the chassis, but this involves removing the plastic bezel off the metal chassis first.

Cheers,

Great Northern aka Canada.

Reply 36128 of 37167, by PD2JK

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Nice stuff Aublak,
See if you can get some L2 cache chips in the future. Depending on the software you're running, improvement may vary a lot. From a few percent to 50.

Reply 36129 of 37167, by rikukos

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Look, I've had my Model 50 486 wide open recently and been testing out some cards. Clone is just that.. a clone.

EurGLYoh.jpg

So this post is about a great little tool I got along with it (made in Taiwan, not China):

eEDg2Mfh.jpg?1

And so I punched a hole with it, the first time in my life..ever. Didn't even practice.

6Nb5Fgmh.jpg?2

Perfect hole. Snug fit, far better than adapting a bracket from a Token Ring card. Secure fit imo, but not screwed down to the card. Take your blank cover to be punched from the memory expansion board or similar to make it a notch above this.

Reply 36130 of 37167, by Aublak

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Like I said earlier I picked up a AM5x86. And I did some research on it and the board. And I dunno if my 486 board is compatible due to voltages.

However I did remember seeing a weird AM5x86 at the recycler. It was soldered to a bunch of sandwiched boards. I think it was a 5x86 with a voltage regulator. hmm. The recycler is a pretty cool guy, he might let me trade my current 5x86 for the modified one if it comes to that.

MMaximus wrote on 2020-09-23, 19:51:

Don't cut the wires!! From the looks of it you need to remove the whole front bezel of the case first. Then you will have access to two screws that will enable you to remove the PSU switch from the case. The PSU switch is attached to the PSU cables and the black adhesive tape is there for a reason, so that there's no wire exposed (these carry mains voltage). Leave it as it is.

However the whole thing looks quite clean to me, I'm not sure you need to remove the PSU from the case...

Oh, okay. I see. Yes, I have to remove the front cover. I feel like such a retard. I still want to open up that PSU and looking inside. That PSU is older than me. The thought of sending currents through that thing makes me uneasy.

Yeah, its super pristine. You could even call it shiny. Its been living in a very dust-free environment.

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Reply 36132 of 37167, by Shagittarius

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Aublak wrote on 2020-09-23, 22:38:
Like I said earlier I picked up a AM5x86. And I did some research on it and the board. And I dunno if my 486 board is compatible […]
Show full quote

Like I said earlier I picked up a AM5x86. And I did some research on it and the board. And I dunno if my 486 board is compatible due to voltages.

However I did remember seeing a weird AM5x86 at the recycler. It was soldered to a bunch of sandwiched boards. I think it was a 5x86 with a voltage regulator. hmm. The recycler is a pretty cool guy, he might let me trade my current 5x86 for the modified one if it comes to that.

MMaximus wrote on 2020-09-23, 19:51:

Don't cut the wires!! From the looks of it you need to remove the whole front bezel of the case first. Then you will have access to two screws that will enable you to remove the PSU switch from the case. The PSU switch is attached to the PSU cables and the black adhesive tape is there for a reason, so that there's no wire exposed (these carry mains voltage). Leave it as it is.

However the whole thing looks quite clean to me, I'm not sure you need to remove the PSU from the case...

Oh, okay. I see. Yes, I have to remove the front cover. I feel like such a retard. I still want to open up that PSU and looking inside. That PSU is older than me. The thought of sending currents through that thing makes me uneasy.

Yeah, its super pristine. You could even call it shiny. Its been living in a very dust-free environment.

The IBM PSU in my IBM AT which was manufactured in 1984 is still going strong!

Reply 36133 of 37167, by kolderman

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Shagittarius wrote on 2020-09-24, 00:40:
Aublak wrote on 2020-09-23, 22:38:
Like I said earlier I picked up a AM5x86. And I did some research on it and the board. And I dunno if my 486 board is compatible […]
Show full quote

Like I said earlier I picked up a AM5x86. And I did some research on it and the board. And I dunno if my 486 board is compatible due to voltages.

However I did remember seeing a weird AM5x86 at the recycler. It was soldered to a bunch of sandwiched boards. I think it was a 5x86 with a voltage regulator. hmm. The recycler is a pretty cool guy, he might let me trade my current 5x86 for the modified one if it comes to that.

MMaximus wrote on 2020-09-23, 19:51:

Don't cut the wires!! From the looks of it you need to remove the whole front bezel of the case first. Then you will have access to two screws that will enable you to remove the PSU switch from the case. The PSU switch is attached to the PSU cables and the black adhesive tape is there for a reason, so that there's no wire exposed (these carry mains voltage). Leave it as it is.

However the whole thing looks quite clean to me, I'm not sure you need to remove the PSU from the case...

Oh, okay. I see. Yes, I have to remove the front cover. I feel like such a retard. I still want to open up that PSU and looking inside. That PSU is older than me. The thought of sending currents through that thing makes me uneasy.

Yeah, its super pristine. You could even call it shiny. Its been living in a very dust-free environment.

The IBM PSU in my IBM AT which was manufactured in 1984 is still going strong!

Back in the day when they made capacitors right.

Reply 36134 of 37167, by Horun

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Aublak wrote on 2020-09-23, 19:39:

Then I bought an entire 386sx computer because I just wanted the case. So now I guess I have a 386 as well. I don't even know how to get started with this, but I guess I'll figure it out as I go along.
The main thing I'm worried about is that PSU. I wouldn't know how to check it for safety.

That is a good looking 386 desktop. Hope it works well.

Hate posting a reply and have to edit it because it made no sense 😁 First computer was an IBM 3270 workstation with CGA monitor. 🤣 Second computer a 286 12Mhz with real IDE drive ! After that came 386, 486, Pentium, P.Pro and everything after....

Reply 36135 of 37167, by devius

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Aublak wrote on 2020-09-23, 22:38:

That PSU is older than me. The thought of sending currents through that thing makes me uneasy.

Will probably be more reliable than many modern PSUs.

Usually looking at it is fine, but it's either already dead or it's working fine and just looking at it won't make a difference. You will be able to identify burnt components or leaking caps, but if some component is burnt it probably already failed open so the PSU will most likely not power on anyway and the damage has already been done, and leaking caps will usually not cause the PSU to blow up or not power on. If some component already failed in storage then looking at it will not allow you to identify any problem and the PSU might still blow up, so what I'm trying to say is that you will have to power it on and see what happens in any case.

Reply 36136 of 37167, by canthearu

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kolderman wrote on 2020-09-24, 01:12:

Back in the day when they made capacitors right.

When they exploded, they did so properly, and filled the room with acrid smoke letting you know that its ok that you just crapped your pants when it went bang!

I'm referring to both RIFA safety paper capacitors, and also old tantalum capacitors.

Reply 36137 of 37167, by Williwinner

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Took me some time to find one at a reasonable price. Finally have a Voodoo Card with 6mb (Miro Hiscore 3D).

Sadly came without the VGA to Mini Din 9-Pin cable. So if sb knows how to get one of these, that would be very much appreciated!

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Reply 36139 of 37167, by Williwinner

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chrismeyer6 wrote on 2020-09-24, 12:32:

Worst case you could make your own cable if you can't find a factory one.

If i can't find one, i will. Btw while looking for it i came across a guy from germany that runs an inofficial support-page for MIRO products.

Very cool guy. Gave me the pin-layout for it.

http://www.mirosupport.de/