VOGONS


First post, by vkcpolice

User metadata
Rank Member
Rank
Member

Hi All Hope everyone is doing well.
i just bought a new keyboard Casio cts190 it says it has GM but the keyboard has a micro B usb port no old skool midi ports.
is it still possible to connect these keyboards to vintage computers?

Reply 1 of 8, by RetroGamer4Ever

User metadata
Rank Member
Rank
Member

It is unsupported by older Windows OS and would not work with a vintage computer OS, even if you could physically connect it, which you cannot, as far as I can tell. It is meant to be connected to smartphones, tablets, and modern computers, with a USB cable or a wireless interface.

Reply 2 of 8, by Bondi

User metadata
Rank Oldbie
Rank
Oldbie

Thanks, RetroGamer4Ever. It's good to know. I was also looking at MIDI keyboards recently. And at the first glance all of them have only USB connector. I'm not sure if any of modern inexpensive keyboards have a classic 5 din connector. Are there any? Or I should find an old used one?

PCMCIA Sound Cards chart

Reply 3 of 8, by RetroGamer4Ever

User metadata
Rank Member
Rank
Member

The pro models occasionally still have the OG MIDI interface, but consumer models almost always don't. Anything with a USB port MUST have a driver for whatever vintage OS you are using, so they are generally a bad buy for that, unless they have the regular MIDI interface. What you should do is scour thrift stores, auction sites, consignment, etc. for older consumer/pro keyboards that are of the early 2000's vintage that would have the USB and MIDI ports, so you can get GS/XG/GM2 hardware that you can connect to a vintage computer. Once you identify a unit that could be suitable, dig up the user manual and support information for it to see if it would work for your particular uses. As far as OS support goes, XP is the best supported vintage OS, cause that's the OS where people were using USB and MIDI interfaces, along with the MIDI software often used in Windows 98.

Reply 4 of 8, by Shponglefan

User metadata
Rank Oldbie
Rank
Oldbie
Bondi wrote on 2022-06-20, 14:34:

Thanks, RetroGamer4Ever. It's good to know. I was also looking at MIDI keyboards recently. And at the first glance all of them have only USB connector. I'm not sure if any of modern inexpensive keyboards have a classic 5 din connector. Are there any? Or I should find an old used one?

Your best bet for inexpensive MIDI controllers is to shop used. Another option is also to look at used synthesizers, since those can also double as a MIDI keyboard if they have a MIDI out. Even some of the old Yamaha and Casio "toy" keyboards had MIDI ports.

There are modern MIDI keyboards with DIN-5 MIDI from companies like Akia, Arturia and Novation. But those typically are in the hundreds of dollars.

My YouTube channel (retro game music)

Reply 8 of 8, by darry

User metadata
Rank l33t
Rank
l33t
Pierre32 wrote on 2022-06-21, 01:00:

I was about to write that as well.

Additionally, repurposing an older USB equipped PC or even a Raspberry PI as a USB host to which one connects both the keyboard over USB and USB to standard MIDI interface would allow creating a DIY host with USB to MIDI (DIN) using software (like loopMIDI under Windows or JACK under Linux ).

EDIT :

The Serdashop adapter linked will only allow the use of the USB keyboard as a controller. It will not allow the use of the USB equipped keyboard as a MIDI synth, as this adapter does not have a DIN MIDI in . The one on Amazon allows both MIDI in and out over classical (DIN) MIDI, but is quit expensive, IMHO. Consequently, repurposing an older USB capable PC (laptop, netbook, etc) that one already owns as a DIY host would probably make sense .