VOGONS


Reply 23240 of 24121, by MarkP

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DundyTheCroc wrote on 2022-11-25, 08:46:

There are many types of WD-40 sprays, for contacts, slots and other electrical equipment use that:
wd.jpg

^^^ What he posted.

Reply 23243 of 24121, by Shreddoc

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MarkP wrote on 2022-11-25, 10:32:
Shreddoc wrote on 2022-11-25, 10:28:

^^But only if you want to clean moving contacts. Not as a general dousing / brushing of cards.

Wrong!

Reasoning?

Last edited by Shreddoc on 2022-11-25, 11:07. Edited 2 times in total.

Reply 23245 of 24121, by MarkP

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appiah4 wrote on 2022-11-25, 10:45:

Using WD-40 to clean elecronics is like showering with DDT..

Rubbish. WD-40 Contact Cleaner is perfectly fine and readily available at a lot of retail outlets.

Reply 23247 of 24121, by MarkP

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Shreddoc wrote on 2022-11-25, 11:28:

Detergent, water and convection are even finer, and are available at your home.

Save the contact cleaner for cleaning contacts imo.

Tap water is usually contaminated with impurities. The people in Flint will confirm that.

Demineralised water is far far better.

Reply 23248 of 24121, by gmaverick2k

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appiah4 wrote on 2022-11-25, 09:03:
Wrong: […]
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chrismeyer6 wrote on 2022-11-24, 12:06:

One of the uses for WD-40 is to spray into your distributor cap if there was moisture in there and your car wouldn't start. There's quite a bit of arcing in a distributor and people's cars didn't go up in flames. Wd-40 is only flammable while it's wet once the solvents in it evaporate it's fine. Don't forget the pvc insulation on your PSU cables are flammable as well. Isopropyl alcohol as well as most contact cleaners are highly flammable.

(Edit: spelling mistake)

Wrong:

Is WD-40 Flammable After Drying?
The main constituent of WD-40 is petrochemical distillates, so it is no doubt that the oil is flammable. However, when dry, it burns slowly without any sound, so it can be called more combustible than flammable. When heated, it goes under oxidation, releasing heat energy and making the oil more likely to combust.

let me guess, it needs an ATEX rating / DSEAR study 🤣
just use clutch cleaner, dry it out and if you live in areas where rust is an issue, like near the sea, apply some WD-40. Source: brian from techyescity

"What's all this racket going on up here, son? You watchin' yer girl cartoons again?"

Reply 23249 of 24121, by Bancho

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Today I carried out a full Re-Cap of my Iwill SS7 Motherboard. Some of the caps were bulging and even though the board works, I want this board to be in its best condition.

Recapped with Panasonic caps. De-Soldering Gun Makes easy work of removing them! Thankfully the board worked after the operations!

Before
dCWIZuMh.jpg
4LcovvNh.jpg

After
pc8dXLvh.jpg

Reply 23250 of 24121, by Babasha

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Final of recoloring)))

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Need help? Begin with photo and model of your hardware 😉

Reply 23251 of 24121, by MarkP

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gmaverick2k wrote on 2022-11-25, 16:34:
appiah4 wrote on 2022-11-25, 09:03:
Wrong: […]
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chrismeyer6 wrote on 2022-11-24, 12:06:

One of the uses for WD-40 is to spray into your distributor cap if there was moisture in there and your car wouldn't start. There's quite a bit of arcing in a distributor and people's cars didn't go up in flames. Wd-40 is only flammable while it's wet once the solvents in it evaporate it's fine. Don't forget the pvc insulation on your PSU cables are flammable as well. Isopropyl alcohol as well as most contact cleaners are highly flammable.

(Edit: spelling mistake)

Wrong:

Is WD-40 Flammable After Drying?
The main constituent of WD-40 is petrochemical distillates, so it is no doubt that the oil is flammable. However, when dry, it burns slowly without any sound, so it can be called more combustible than flammable. When heated, it goes under oxidation, releasing heat energy and making the oil more likely to combust.

let me guess, it needs an ATEX rating / DSEAR study 🤣
just use clutch cleaner, dry it out and if you live in areas where rust is an issue, like near the sea, apply some WD-40. Source: brian from techyescity

He is referring to the original waxed based WD-40 product, designed to prevent corrosion of rockets on rocket launch pads, not the WD-40 branded contact cleaner.

NEXT!

Last edited by MarkP on 2022-11-25, 18:20. Edited 1 time in total.

Reply 23252 of 24121, by Cosmic

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Babasha wrote on 2022-11-25, 18:03:

Final of recoloring)))

WOW that's a beautiful color scheme. The muted blues/greys gives it a high-end workstation vibe in my opinion.

There's all this talk of WD-40 for cleaning electronics here... how about Deoxit? Some retro YouTubers seem to swear by it. "Deoxit that socket!" - Adrian's Digital Basement

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Reply 23253 of 24121, by Kahenraz

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I've been experimenting with DeoxIT for a while now, and I can recommend the smaller vials with a brush. The spray cans are really gross, it gets everywhere, and has some kind of oil or film to it that never dries. So you end up getting all of that overspray on your hands by touching the hardware afterwards forever, unless you clean it off in the sink. At which point you've removed all of the DeoxIT...

Reply 23254 of 24121, by PcBytes

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Bancho wrote on 2022-11-25, 17:45:
After https://i.imgur.com/pc8dXLvh.jpg […]
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After
pc8dXLvh.jpg

Nice, though you missed adding back one cap - near the southbridge.

"Enter at your own peril, past the bolted door..."
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Reply 23255 of 24121, by Bancho

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PcBytes wrote on 2022-11-25, 18:53:
Bancho wrote on 2022-11-25, 17:45:
After https://i.imgur.com/pc8dXLvh.jpg […]
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After
pc8dXLvh.jpg

Nice, though you missed adding back one cap - near the southbridge.

I'd spotted that after I'd taken the picture 😁 and proceeded to add it.

6ABZv3ph.jpg

Reply 23256 of 24121, by MarkP

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The WD-40 BRAND product range for the completely clueless https://www.wd40.com/products/

Last edited by MarkP on 2022-11-25, 19:30. Edited 1 time in total.

Reply 23257 of 24121, by ODwilly

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The blue torch rust penetrator is an absolute life saver working on rusty car crap.

Main pc: Asus ROG 17. R9 5900HX, RTX 3070m, 16gb ddr4 3200, 1tb NVME.
Retro PC: Soyo P4S Dragon, 3gb ddr 266, 120gb Maxtor, Geforce Fx 5950 Ultra, SB Live! 5.1

Reply 23258 of 24121, by Shreddoc

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MarkP wrote on 2022-11-25, 11:35:
Shreddoc wrote on 2022-11-25, 11:28:

Detergent, water and convection are even finer, and are available at your home.

Save the contact cleaner for cleaning contacts imo.

Tap water is usually contaminated with impurities. The people in Flint will confirm that.

Demineralised water is far far better.

If tap water's good enough for the likes of necroware and other highly respected repairers, then it's good enough for me. It's difficult to get "far far better" than a 100% success rate using tap water in the cleaning of boards over many years.

But I understand that you may make the same claim about dousing circuit boards in WD-40, if you wish. So you do you, man. WD-40 or contact-cleaner up all your stuff as much as you like. Yay planet.

Cosmic wrote on 2022-11-25, 18:17:

There's all this talk of WD-40 for cleaning electronics here... how about Deoxit? Some retro YouTubers seem to swear by it. "Deoxit that socket!" - Adrian's Digital Basement

Exactly. A socket is a moving contact. Where two separate surfaces move in and out of contact with each other. That's what contact cleaner is for. Not for general dousings of circuit boards, as though it were some magical improver or protector for electronics in general.

What Adrian (and other experts) are most certainly not saying, is "as a general rule, you should douse all your circuit boards all over in WD-40 or contact cleaner".

Reply 23259 of 24121, by MarkP

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Shreddoc wrote on 2022-11-25, 20:59:
If tap water's good enough for the likes of necroware and other highly respected repairers, then it's good enough for me. It's d […]
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MarkP wrote on 2022-11-25, 11:35:
Shreddoc wrote on 2022-11-25, 11:28:

Detergent, water and convection are even finer, and are available at your home.

Save the contact cleaner for cleaning contacts imo.

Tap water is usually contaminated with impurities. The people in Flint will confirm that.

Demineralised water is far far better.

If tap water's good enough for the likes of necroware and other highly respected repairers, then it's good enough for me. It's difficult to get "far far better" than a 100% success rate using tap water in the cleaning of boards over many years.

But I understand that you may make the same claim about dousing circuit boards in WD-40, if you wish. So you do you, man. WD-40 or contact-cleaner up all your stuff as much as you like. Yay planet.

Cosmic wrote on 2022-11-25, 18:17:

There's all this talk of WD-40 for cleaning electronics here... how about Deoxit? Some retro YouTubers seem to swear by it. "Deoxit that socket!" - Adrian's Digital Basement

Exactly. A socket is a moving contact. Where two separate surfaces move in and out of contact with each other. That's what contact cleaner is for. Not for general dousings of circuit boards, as though it were some magical improver or protector for electronics in general.

What Adrian (and other experts) are most certainly not saying, is "as a general rule, you should douse all your circuit boards all over in WD-40 or contact cleaner".

Don't be stupid and over sensitive dude.

Facts don't care about feelings.