VOGONS


Reply 60 of 103, by Elia1995

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The 6x86 in the photo wasn't already in the motherboard, I put it in since it was Socket 7.

Currently assembled vintage computers I own: 11

Most important ones:
A "modded" Olivetti M4 434 S (currently broken).
An Epson El Plus 386DX running MS-DOS 6.22 (currently broken).
Celeron Coppermine 1.10GHz on an M754LMRTP motherboard

Reply 61 of 103, by Cyrix200+

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Elia1995 wrote:

The 6x86 in the photo wasn't already in the motherboard, I put it in since it was Socket 7.

Ah, okay. You might want to start with one of your Pentiums in that board, maybe that 120MHz? Then set all the jumpers in the right positions, these boards don't recognise CPU parameters automatically.

For most Pentium 120 CPU's that would be

60MHz FSB (jumpers J7 & J8)
3.3V voltage (jumper JP1)
Clock ratio 2x (jumers J13 & J14)

It's really useful to find a manual for the board, we need to check if there are more jumpers to set. There might for example be a jumper to switch between single and dual voltage rails for the CPU, if dual is even supported). You need dual voltage for the Cyrix CPU, and having the jumpers/settings wrong might destroy the CPU!

1982 - 2001

Reply 62 of 103, by Elia1995

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The problem is that I can't find the model of neither of those 2 Socket 7 AT boards written anywhere, not even behind them, there are no stickers and I can't find neither the brand nor the model.

Currently assembled vintage computers I own: 11

Most important ones:
A "modded" Olivetti M4 434 S (currently broken).
An Epson El Plus 386DX running MS-DOS 6.22 (currently broken).
Celeron Coppermine 1.10GHz on an M754LMRTP motherboard

Reply 63 of 103, by Tetrium

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Elia1995 wrote:

The problem is that I can't find the model of neither of those 2 Socket 7 AT boards written anywhere, not even behind them, there are no stickers and I can't find neither the brand nor the model.

The board with the Cyrix in it has REV 1.0 in a corner. Often model numbers on boards such as that one are hidden a bit (sometimes they can be interwoven into a larger string). If you want, you could upload pics of the PCB (also the back with everything being able to read). The model number can also be on a sticker on the bottom ISA (or PCI) slot.
There's got to be something on there, especially if you got 2 boards, chances are good you might have overlooked something for us to find 😀

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Reply 64 of 103, by Cyrix200+

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Tetrium wrote:
Elia1995 wrote:

The problem is that I can't find the model of neither of those 2 Socket 7 AT boards written anywhere, not even behind them, there are no stickers and I can't find neither the brand nor the model.

The board with the Cyrix in it has REV 1.0 in a corner. Often model numbers on boards such as that one are hidden a bit (sometimes they can be interwoven into a larger string). If you want, you could upload pics of the PCB (also the back with everything being able to read). The model number can also be on a sticker on the bottom ISA (or PCI) slot.
There's got to be something on there, especially if you got 2 boards, chances are good you might have overlooked something for us to find 😀

Yes, if you could provide many pictures we can probably get you underway 😀 I'm also curious about your AT PSU, so if you could also make some more pictures of that?

1982 - 2001

Reply 65 of 103, by Elia1995

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Ok guys, just took these photos, I show you every connector of that AT PSU and all the sides of it aswell.
I also took some photos of both Socket 7 AT boards from top and from bottom, I noticed a few stickers, let's see...

Eyc5bSIgRXa-j03qj6ipdg.png
BhyIc0mQQ-ierk4U6_BhjA.png
1f4WSXHGTwigGfNpcbv79w.png
7L3wG3OiTUGRI9h_CbI85g.png
GmW8Dc9yRCmXIvPUbAagcw.png
4dE8c0LtS5eDF_XWmisO6A.png
Now some close-ups of the connectors:
DXoHdXNqQuOVUU4Y9UB_TQ.png
Molex + Floppy
XKlmLoRcQHqCQJRqe5KzOg.png
2 Molexes
CvokeB37SnixkNtg0JssfA.png
More Molexes
lhx1kRFBQZmrq4jXqu2dBA.png
The AT connectors
H25ATBO-QWGvCWr84VtKgQ.png
Another floppy connector probably for the 5" drives

Now for the motherboards:

Iq7KkfI.jpg
OcLNVkq.jpg
S5LChw0XSsO4OxfIsnvKWA.png
That's the only sticker I found on the ISA slots here
u3aTuHsQTlKFB-gkJqV2qQ.png
And that's the only sticker on her bottom

ZFYPql2.jpg
RwNEGQ9.jpg
HRKmkdcoTTmGtp82_lFaew.png
While the smaller one has these stickers on the lowest ISA slot
Rck1Pyk-SSeBatAsT4Yv-g.png
And this annoying plastic mushroom on her bottom that prevents the board from staying flat...

li0UWeduSwSu2ZvEklP4Rg.png
Googling the number of the first motherboard's sticker is useless.

Currently assembled vintage computers I own: 11

Most important ones:
A "modded" Olivetti M4 434 S (currently broken).
An Epson El Plus 386DX running MS-DOS 6.22 (currently broken).
Celeron Coppermine 1.10GHz on an M754LMRTP motherboard

Reply 66 of 103, by Cyrix200+

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Great! First the power supply: it looks like an AT power supply, it has AT-style motherboard connectors but it is missing the AT power switch. There is an IBM part number on the label, so I guess it is a IBM proprietary power supply Google doesn't have any information I can find on it. IBM pt no 8124922 . The black connector P7 is not standard, so it is probably involved in powering on the power supply. Maybe someone more familiar with IBM hardware recognizes it and knows how to use it? I'll get back to you on the motherboards if someone else doesn't beat me to it 😀

EDIT #2: The PSU seems to be from a IBM PS/2 Model 2168. There is some information on powering it on on this page: http://oldcomputer.info/pc/ps1_2168/index.htm it mentions:

Power Supply Unit

Power supply unit for this IBM is quite non-standard. The pinout is exactly like AT, but the unit has additional 3-pin connector. This connector is used as a power switch, making the power supply unit run when pins are shorted.

I don't know what pins to short in the connector, be careful!

EDIT #1: you should be able to remove the 'mushrooms' by using some small pliers to squeeze them on the component side of the board and pushing them down. Gently! It can be a bit fiddly to do, don't use too much force!

Last edited by Cyrix200+ on 2017-08-10, 10:26. Edited 3 times in total.

1982 - 2001

Reply 67 of 103, by Cyrix200+

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The second motherboard seems to be a Zida (Tomato) 5DVX rev 1.21 (can't see the revision very well but you should be able to check it on the board next to the type printed on it). There is some info for rev 1.30 here: http://www.uncreativelabs.de/th99/m/U-Z/35468.htm

Last edited by Cyrix200+ on 2017-08-10, 11:54. Edited 1 time in total.

1982 - 2001

Reply 68 of 103, by Tetrium

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The 2nd board shows 5DVX between the 1st and 2nd PCI slots, the other board seems to be tougher to ID.
That plastic mushroom looks like one of those standoffs that's typical for AT cases, he should keep it as both AT motherboards and AT cases may be missing these. So don't throw it out 🤣

1st motherboard: What's that logo next to "M1"? It's on the back of the board. Also the fact it's made in Taiwan may help ID it.

8742 resulted in nothing, but it does remind me of species 7482 🤣, but that may just be some coincidence 😜

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Reply 69 of 103, by Tetrium

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th99 has this board, looks a lot like your unknown board.
http://www.uncreativelabs.de/th99/m/A-B/34330.htm

edit:
34330-1.png
ADVANCED INTEGRATION RESEARCH, INC. 54TVP-III

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Reply 70 of 103, by Cyrix200+

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Tetrium wrote:
th99 has this board, looks a lot like your unknown board. http://www.uncreativelabs.de/th99/m/A-B/34330.htm […]
Show full quote

th99 has this board, looks a lot like your unknown board.
http://www.uncreativelabs.de/th99/m/A-B/34330.htm

edit:
<snip>
ADVANCED INTEGRATION RESEARCH, INC. 54TVP-III

Nice find! So now we found them both! If we figure out a way to active the PSU he can start testing! I think shorting pin 2 & 3 should do the trick, but I need someone more knowledgeable to verify that 😀

1982 - 2001

Reply 71 of 103, by kixs

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Get yourself a normal AT PSU with power switch - if you want to play with pre-ATX stuff. Otherwise P1 requires 72-pin memory to be installed in pairs of the same capacity. On board #1 there is only one SIMM, so it won't POST. On the other one it seems they SIMMs are mixed - it might work.

To test the boards use any Pentium 90/100/120. They usually work with any settings - unless it was configured for Pentium-MMX, then it won't boot. You'll have to configure the board correctly.

My Amibay: SALE | BUY - Updated on 2020-05-25

Reply 72 of 103, by Tetrium

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Cyrix200+ wrote:
Tetrium wrote:
th99 has this board, looks a lot like your unknown board. http://www.uncreativelabs.de/th99/m/A-B/34330.htm […]
Show full quote

th99 has this board, looks a lot like your unknown board.
http://www.uncreativelabs.de/th99/m/A-B/34330.htm

edit:
<snip>
ADVANCED INTEGRATION RESEARCH, INC. 54TVP-III

Nice find! So now we found them both! If we figure out a way to active the PSU he can start testing! I think shorting pin 2 & 3 should do the trick, but I need someone more knowledgeable to verify that 😀

Ahh ffs, I somehow overlooked that PSU did not even have the standard AT power switch 🤣! whoops 😊

kixs wrote:

Get yourself a normal AT PSU with power switch - if you want to play with pre-ATX stuff. Otherwise P1 requires 72-pin memory to be installed in pairs of the same capacity. On board #1 there is only one SIMM, so it won't POST. On the other one it seems they SIMMs are mixed - it might work.

To test the boards use any Pentium 90/100/120. They usually work with any settings - unless it was configured for Pentium-MMX, then it won't boot. You'll have to configure the board correctly.

I'd tend to agree with this here. Though if that PSU at least has the same pinouts otherwise (and if he can't find another AT PSU to use on short notice), wouldn't he be fine using that odd-AT PSU for at least basic testing purposes? In that case it doesn't matter if he has to find some other way to flip the power when using that odd PSU in any actual build? And that way he can at least continue testing without too much interruption.

I didn't consider him not being able to boot these due to using only single SIMMs, because he mentioned the Cyrix chip wasn't in there when he tested and the fact that the Cyrix isn't even heatsinked (which would probably instantly fry or at least damage the CPU when trying to apply power).
And he didn't manage to apply power to the boards due to it not having a regular power switch.

My personal favorite when testing boards like these are indeed such Pentiums, as these are very compatible and not much could go wrong (except maybe when accidentally doing a vast overclock (like 100MHz FSB + 3x multi, or something), but this should be preventable as the jumper settings are printed on the board most of the time anyway).

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Reply 73 of 103, by Elia1995

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What about the Pentium not having an heatsink ? Would it instantly fry as well or Pentiums can work like the 486 processors without anything on them ?
I do have coolers anyway, so it won't be a problem, just want to make sure if that Pentium 120 would instantly fry like a barbecue.
While on the Cyrix 6x86 it's written on the CPU itself that it requires an heatsink, so I would've put one on it anyway, but on the Pentium there are no warnings.

Currently assembled vintage computers I own: 11

Most important ones:
A "modded" Olivetti M4 434 S (currently broken).
An Epson El Plus 386DX running MS-DOS 6.22 (currently broken).
Celeron Coppermine 1.10GHz on an M754LMRTP motherboard

Reply 74 of 103, by Cyrix200+

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Elia1995 wrote:

What about the Pentium not having an heatsink ? Would it instantly fry as well or Pentiums can work like the 486 processors without anything on them ?
I do have coolers anyway, so it won't be a problem, just want to make sure if that Pentium 120 would instantly fry like a barbecue.
While on the Cyrix 6x86 it's written on the CPU itself that it requires an heatsink, so I would've put one on it anyway, but on the Pentium there are no warnings.

I would not risk and try without a heatsink. You have a heatsink/fan you can use, it is in the system with the AOpen MX59Pro motherboard: https://image.prntscr.com/image/Gkn7oZLsQqSfnuOi6x2uxg.png

1982 - 2001

Reply 75 of 103, by Tetrium

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The boxed Pentiums sold directly to end consumers came with a HSF mounted directly to the CPU, so these didn't need a HSF installation guide. Pentiums sold in trays were I think intended to be installed only by people who got an education in this field (like A+ certified people), it's why it may not have been printed on the chips themselves as these people knew about that already.
It also may have been that it was common knowledge at that point in time. I'm unable to find any official manual on the Intel site atm. Maybe I'll find one later.

It's unwise to go with only the info that you see when observing the parts themselves and do some additional research at the least. Especially in the beginning, I was doing reading and reading manuals and all kinds of sources of information a LOT. Later on I got the hang of things and things got to go more smoothly. But at the start, I basically googled everything 🤣, even serial numbers which got me nothing. I learned by doing (my homework) 😜.

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Reply 76 of 103, by Elia1995

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The appliance is the same as post-ceramic CPUs, right ?
Small droplet of thermal paste in the middle and then smash the HSF onto it ?

Currently assembled vintage computers I own: 11

Most important ones:
A "modded" Olivetti M4 434 S (currently broken).
An Epson El Plus 386DX running MS-DOS 6.22 (currently broken).
Celeron Coppermine 1.10GHz on an M754LMRTP motherboard

Reply 77 of 103, by Cyrix200+

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Elia1995 wrote:

The appliance is the same as post-ceramic CPUs, right ?
Small droplet of thermal paste in the middle and then smash the HSF onto it ?

Yes. It will help thermal conductivity a bit.

I don't use it myself on these CPU's. Only on Pentium II and up.

1982 - 2001

Reply 79 of 103, by Tetrium

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Elia1995 wrote:

The appliance is the same as post-ceramic CPUs, right ?
Small droplet of thermal paste in the middle and then smash the HSF onto it ?

Except for the smashing part, it basically is, yes 😀
These chips are not that hot compared to newer chips (except maybe some Cyrix's and a few AMDs), so you can get away with more mistakes and such a Pentium could make due without any TIM (I'll typically use my cheapest stuff on there, if only because it does improve cooling efficiency and so it remains a habit).

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