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socket 4 cooler

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First post, by Amigaz

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Have got my hands on a socket 4 motherboard with a whopping Pentium 60 but I got no suitable cooler that fits.
Anyone know were to find these coolers nowdays?

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Reply 3 of 23, by Amigaz

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Moogle! wrote:

Damn, look at all that cache. This board is made for serious business. 😁

Does the CPU really spit out as much heat as they say?

hehe, this board rfeels like a socket 3 mobo they just threw on a Pentium chip on judging by the looks of it...you can really tell it was made in 1994

Haven't used it yet so can't tell about the heat but by looking how other manafacturers like Compaq for example back then....they used a passive hs on the 60mhz model and a hs + fan on the 66mhz model.
I plan to get a 66mhz chip for it later on

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Reply 4 of 23, by Amigaz

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After some testing with this mobo I can report that this CPU runs....HOT!! 😮

Definately needs active coolong so I must fit a fan on my big heatsink if I don't want to toast the chip

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Reply 5 of 23, by swaaye

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Yeah they're gonna run relatively hot. These chips are built on a semiconductor process less dense than even that of the later 486s, after all. I'm sure a K6 would blow a P5-66 away in thermal output though!

These original P5s got everyone excited because they were the "hottest yet" at the time. Nothing compared to what came a few years later!!

Reply 6 of 23, by Amigaz

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swaaye wrote:

Yeah they're gonna run relatively hot. These chips are built on a semiconductor process less dense than even that of the later 486s, after all. I'm sure a K6 would blow a P5-66 away in thermal output though!

These original P5s got everyone excited because they were the "hottest yet" at the time. Nothing compared to what came a few years later!!

btw. have you put your socket 4 board to the test yet?

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Reply 7 of 23, by swaaye

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Amigaz wrote:

btw. have you put your socket 4 board to the test yet?

It had some damage to it so I didn't even try. I actually removed one of the PS2 ports too, trying to get one rigged up to my 486 mobo. No go there. Heh.

I had a hard time getting excited about a P60 and a mobo with basically 486 components on it. If I'm gonna build Pentium sys, I'd rather use my ASUS P5A mobo....

But it was interesting to see the Socket 4 motherboard and read about it. It was very cheap too. But it was all scratched up on the back and one of the PCI slots was bent at an angle! So I didn't feel like messing with it at all.

Reply 8 of 23, by Anonymous Coward

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I can't remember if I posted a picture of my socket4 board here or not. But in terms of being a socket3 board with a pentium CPU slapped on, you won't get much better than this:

TMC PAT45PVS

VLBPentium.jpg

This is not a socket3 motherboard with a POD83. This is a Socket4 motherboard with a POD5V133. This motherboard is fully 32-bit, there is no 64-bit access to memory. There are pure ISA Pentium systems out there too.

"Will the highways on the internets become more few?" -Gee Dubya
V'Ger XT|Upgraded AT|Ultimate 386|Super VL/EISA 486|SMP VL/EISA Pentium

Reply 9 of 23, by Amigaz

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swaaye wrote:

Yeah they're gonna run relatively hot. These chips are built on a semiconductor process less dense than even that of the later 486s, after all. I'm sure a K6 would blow a P5-66 away in thermal output though!

These original P5s got everyone excited because they were the "hottest yet" at the time. Nothing compared to what came a few years later!!

I'm sorry to hear that 🙁

I think it will be fun to experiment with this grandaddy Pentium cpu and see what it's capable of..especially in early pentium optimized games
Going to build a win 3.11/95 multi boot box

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Reply 10 of 23, by Amigaz

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Anonymous Coward wrote:
I can't remember if I posted a picture of my socket4 board here or not. But in terms of being a socket3 board with a pentium CPU […]
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I can't remember if I posted a picture of my socket4 board here or not. But in terms of being a socket3 board with a pentium CPU slapped on, you won't get much better than this:

TMC PAT45PVS

VLBPentium.jpg

This is not a socket3 motherboard with a POD83. This is a Socket4 motherboard with a POD5V133. This motherboard is fully 32-bit, there is no 64-bit access to memory. There are pure ISA Pentium systems out there too.

You know I'm a frequent lurker on your picasa webalbum so I've seen it xx times 😁
I'ts amazing that they just threw on a Pentium on this socket 3 style mobo..it's like a socket 3 pentium od cpu on stereoids!
From what year is it? 1993?

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Reply 11 of 23, by Anonymous Coward

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I believe the BIOS is from mid 1993. It's probably hard to get one much older than that.

The board performs surprisingly well (especially with the overdrive in place). However, the memory performance is a bit lacking. I'm not sure if writeback is enabled or not, but I'm inclined to say that it is. What is that benchmarking program you use on your 5x86 system will all of the nifty graphs?

"Will the highways on the internets become more few?" -Gee Dubya
V'Ger XT|Upgraded AT|Ultimate 386|Super VL/EISA 486|SMP VL/EISA Pentium

Reply 12 of 23, by 5u3

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Anonymous Coward wrote:

What is that benchmarking program you use on your 5x86 system will all of the nifty graphs?

System Speed Test (a.k.a Speedsys) v4.78

Attached below.

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  • Filename
    sst478.zip
    File size
    110.31 KiB
    Downloads
    1645 downloads
    File comment
    System Speed Test (SST) 4.78 (ZIP archive)
    File license
    Fair use/fair dealing exception

Reply 13 of 23, by Anonymous Coward

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I found these CPU adapters on ebay that are made by Dell and convert Socket 4 to Socket 5. Ever tried one of these before?

"Will the highways on the internets become more few?" -Gee Dubya
V'Ger XT|Upgraded AT|Ultimate 386|Super VL/EISA 486|SMP VL/EISA Pentium

Reply 14 of 23, by Amigaz

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Update:

Found a 66mhz Pentium and put on the board....thought a big socket 7 heatsink without a fan would do the job but the heatsink quickly turned red hot after a couple of minutes, 🤣 😁

Speedsys and pc player benchmarks scores are quite nice, will post them later.

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Reply 15 of 23, by Anonymous Coward

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I once had a dell optiplex P60 that only used passive cooling. I think the IBM P60 systems were like that also. Just get a bigger heatink 😁

"Will the highways on the internets become more few?" -Gee Dubya
V'Ger XT|Upgraded AT|Ultimate 386|Super VL/EISA 486|SMP VL/EISA Pentium

Reply 16 of 23, by Amigaz

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Anonymous Coward wrote:

I once had a dell optiplex P60 that only used passive cooling. I think the IBM P60 systems were like that also. Just get a bigger heatink 😁

My hs is circa 4cm high, 🤣
A bigger hs would look abnormal on that mobo, hehe

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Reply 17 of 23, by retro games 100

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Pardon me for temporarily altering the flow of this conversation a little bit, but I was testing a 486 board (socket 3) yesterday with an intel 486sx-33 cpu on board, and as this mobo was clearly straining to cope with windows 98 + 16MB of ram, I decided to put my fingers on the cpu to see how warm it was. Ouch. I had no idea how hot it would be. So, now I have placed a very fast 12cm case fan directly over the cpu, just to be on the safe side. After 10+ mins of use, I power down the mobo, push aside the fan, and put my fingers on the CPU. Luke warm I'd say. 😀

Reply 18 of 23, by swaaye

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hey I ran a DX2/50 for years without even a heatsink. That's how they usually came.

The >75MHz 486s needed a heatsink+fan tho. You can run them with just a heatsink though as long as it's a big enough heatsink. Something from a Pentium would probably work fine.

Reply 19 of 23, by retro games 100

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swaaye wrote:

hey I ran a DX2/50 for years without even a heatsink. That's how they usually came.

The >75MHz 486s needed a heatsink+fan tho. You can run them with just a heatsink though as long as it's a big enough heatsink. Something from a Pentium would probably work fine.

OK! 😀

I bought a pile of old Pentium CPUs from "guess where", and they range from about 100mhz to the 200mhz MMX variety. I also have a small pile of socket 7 boards I'd like to test them out on. I'm going to try keeping these CPUs cool using a fast case fan, without a heatsink, just to check whether the CPUs work OK. Stop me if you think I'm going to start a fire. 😉