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My Big Red Switch 486

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Reply 40 of 48, by Hezus

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That's one hefty machine! I love those big red switches. Always happy to flip the one on my IBM model 30.

Seems you've got all the bases covered when it comes to DOS gaming. Awesome to see that Roland card. Probably only the later era games with true 16 bit stereo sound will not reach their full potential on that SB pro.

Thanks for all those benchmarks. Very useful information!

Visit my YT Channel!

Reply 43 of 48, by Warlord

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This is great, I wish I had a couple of your components. I love the big red switch as well as I have one too. I made my own turbo panel with some more switches just becasue I love the feeling of flipping the switches. I know its ghetto looking but I love it.
file.php?id=98500&mode=view

Reply 45 of 48, by Warlord

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Theres a site that lists a lot of different turbo LEDs. Mine wasn't on there unfortunately. http://www.minuszerodegrees.net/led_speed_dis … eed_display.htm

The main thing to know is they are a just a dumb pannel that doesn't actually read the clock speed from the motherboard. They are just jumpered to display whatever you want with a switch that will display the top or bottom config which ever way you flip the switch. The motherboard throttles based on just a single jumper either open or closed. So I rigged my panel up so that if I flip the switch up it displays the top row and opens the turbo jumper on the board. If I flip it down it displays the bottom row and then jumpers the board.

Some boards have 2 jumpers on them and can control the pannel. Mine only had one jumper.

This is the diagram I made of how I did it.

file.php?id=91017&mode=view

Reply 46 of 48, by vellu

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Warlord wrote on 2021-08-18, 07:25:
Theres a site that lists a lot of different turbo LEDs. Mine wasn't on there unfortunately. http://www.minuszerodegrees.net/l […]
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Theres a site that lists a lot of different turbo LEDs. Mine wasn't on there unfortunately. http://www.minuszerodegrees.net/led_speed_dis … eed_display.htm

The main thing to know is they are a just a dumb pannel that doesn't actually read the clock speed from the motherboard. They are just jumpered to display whatever you want with a switch that will display the top or bottom config which ever way you flip the switch. The motherboard throttles based on just a single jumper either open or closed. So I rigged my panel up so that if I flip the switch up it displays the top row and opens the turbo jumper on the board. If I flip it down it displays the bottom row and then jumpers the board.

Some boards have 2 jumpers on them and can control the pannel. Mine only had one jumper.

This is the diagram I made of how I did it.

awesome, thanks!

retro rack

Reply 47 of 48, by firage

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I love the beastly towers with red switches. They're majestic. 😀

RetroBard wrote on 2021-08-15, 14:06:

Nice one! I used to have that exact same casing housing my 286 and later my 386 DX clone and am actually trying to find one to build a retrogaming PC.

That's cool, I've only ever seen the case once elsewhere. I had a feeling it was old enough for a 286.

Bruno128 wrote on 2021-08-03, 06:23:

Hi firage thats one great build. Could you please specify the BIOS flash type you used. It should be 64Kbyte, probably 27C512?

Thank you. That's right, it's a M27C512, UV EPROM. That's what it came with originally and my replacement's the same type. I'm positive you can also use a W27C512 and similar EEPROM's, although finding genuine old chips isn't easy anymore.

My big-red-switch 486

Reply 48 of 48, by RetroBard

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firage wrote on 2021-09-06, 10:59:

I love the beastly towers with red switches. They're majestic. 😀

RetroBard wrote on 2021-08-15, 14:06:

Nice one! I used to have that exact same casing housing my 286 and later my 386 DX clone and am actually trying to find one to build a retrogaming PC.

That's cool, I've only ever seen the case once elsewhere. I had a feeling it was old enough for a 286.

Mine was Microgem branded. It was tested in Tekniikan Maailma magazine in 1990. I think I still might have that mag.