VOGONS


First post, by ChrisK

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Recently seen in the bay:

intel pentium 'job 1' confidential.jpg
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Anyone seen something similar before?
What is this? A Pentium prototype?
Sure it is, but:
The package is for socket 5 / 7, but the date code looks like week 52 of 1990.
First Pentium was for socket 4 and was released in March 1993. So if, this must be a VERY early prototype.
Any thoughts?

RetroPC: K6-III+/400ATZ @6x83@1.7V / CT-5SIM / 2x 64M SDR / 40G HDD / RIVA TNT / V2 SLI / CT4520
ModernPC: Phenom II 910e @ 3GHz / ALiveDual-eSATA2 / 4x 2GB DDR-II / 512G SSD / 750G HDD / RX470

Reply 1 of 12, by H3nrik V!

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Does the spec say "Q0520"? That is not found in CPU-World database ...

Please use the "quote" option if asking questions to what I write - it will really up the chances of me noticing 😀

Reply 3 of 12, by ChrisK

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H3nrik V! wrote on 2024-06-04, 12:32:

Does the spec say "Q0520"? That is not found in CPU-World database ...

The spec code should be above the goldcap. Unfortunately it is not readable.
Below the goldcap there's normally the date code. I'd read it as "C0520", hence "C"=manufacturing site, "0"=1990 and "52" = week 52. Of course I could be wrong on this but that's how I'd interprete it according to my knowledge. Or, "0"=2000, but that wouldn't make much sense either.

RetroPC: K6-III+/400ATZ @6x83@1.7V / CT-5SIM / 2x 64M SDR / 40G HDD / RIVA TNT / V2 SLI / CT4520
ModernPC: Phenom II 910e @ 3GHz / ALiveDual-eSATA2 / 4x 2GB DDR-II / 512G SSD / 750G HDD / RX470

Reply 5 of 12, by debs3759

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Definitely not a 1990 date code, with a 1993 copyright. Also, 2000 is too late. I'm not convinced this CPU has a date code on it.

See my graphics card database at www.gpuzoo.com
Constantly being worked on. Feel free to message me with any corrections or details of cards you would like me to research and add.

Reply 6 of 12, by ChrisK

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OK, Q0520, convinced 😉
Looking at the picture at cpu-world.com the date code indeed is above the goldcap. Could've sworn it was vice versa. Age is hitting...
So this part is authentic and sure enough a nice & rare collector's item! Lucky bidder.
Thanks all for clearing this up!

RetroPC: K6-III+/400ATZ @6x83@1.7V / CT-5SIM / 2x 64M SDR / 40G HDD / RIVA TNT / V2 SLI / CT4520
ModernPC: Phenom II 910e @ 3GHz / ALiveDual-eSATA2 / 4x 2GB DDR-II / 512G SSD / 750G HDD / RX470

Reply 7 of 12, by rmay635703

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What I’ve always found pathetic was Intels pension to always screw early adopters with non-upgradable sockets.

Socket 4 p60 wasn’t even released and Intel was already planning socket 5 and 3.3 volts.

They should have released 1 pentium socket with a voltage selector so folks wouldn’t get sandboxed

Reply 8 of 12, by Disruptor

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rmay635703 wrote on 2024-06-04, 18:56:

Socket 4 p60 wasn’t even released and Intel was already planning socket 5 and 3.3 volts.

Haha, they had to.
They even had to overvolt their 66 MHz Socket 4 Pentium slightly from 5.0V +-5% to 5.15V +-5%
And it got so hot!

Reply 9 of 12, by Deunan

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That thing shouts fake to me. Or perhaps it is some sort of memento, made way later out of dead chips.

I haven't worked at Intel, or designed any chips, but I've seen prototypes. You do not put a logo and other brand markings on a prototype. Laser engraved serial on the package - maybe. But no copyright. What for, this is not going to leave the lab.
Frankly an early prototype would not be packaged like this at all, how do you access the silicon with the lid already soldered? Unless it was already so far down the testing phase that the core was working without issues and this was a socket compatibility test article - in which case it would probably already have proper spec code and other type markings. Simply because such chips would also be sent to mobo makers.

Reply 10 of 12, by BitWrangler

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rmay635703 wrote on 2024-06-04, 18:56:

What I’ve always found pathetic was Intels pension to always screw early adopters with non-upgradable sockets.

^penchant ... was meant I presume.

Unicorn herding operations are proceeding, but all the totes of hens teeth and barrels of rocking horse poop give them plenty of hiding spots.

Reply 12 of 12, by Sphere478

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rmay635703 wrote on 2024-06-04, 18:56:

What I’ve always found pathetic was Intels pension to always screw early adopters with non-upgradable sockets.

Socket 4 p60 wasn’t even released and Intel was already planning socket 5 and 3.3 volts.

They should have released 1 pentium socket with a voltage selector so folks wouldn’t get sandboxed

Technically a socket 4 to socket 5 interposer should be possible

Would need level shifters 5v to 3.3v for signaling if I recall correctly and 3.3v supply for vcc from there you might even be able to seperate out vcc2 and get k6 in there.

The bios is obviously going to have a stroke with that, but this all seems very possible.

But with how rare socket 4 boards are, motivation is pretty low.

Sphere's PCB projects.
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Sphere’s socket 5/7 cpu collection.
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SUCCESSFUL K6-2+ to K6-3+ Full Cache Enable Mod
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Tyan S1564S to S1564D single to dual processor conversion (also s1563 and s1562)