VOGONS


Bought these (retro) hardware today

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Reply 44120 of 45397, by Cuttoon

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AngryByDefault wrote on 2022-04-25, 00:47:

a working ¿"SB 16"? CT2940 with OPL chip.

That is indeed a really good SB16 model. It has the Vibra Pro chip, is very low noise but comes with that relatively rare, square low-power OPL3 - many did not and relied on shitty emulation.
The IDE port and amplifier are also there. Others look like this:
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/common … SB16-CT2940.JPG
So, nice catch!

I like jumpers.

Reply 44121 of 45397, by Cuttoon

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Price of a beer, most expensive Pentium 133 I bought since 1997.
Ebay picture looks almost black and some others on the web look black and this one looks at least darker than many.
Were those differences batches, different production facilities or did they simply rip open a different shade of clay that day?

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Ideal chip to test S7 boards - passive cooling, easy to handle, no heatsink attachment needed.
But still, I'm wondering if I could get that heatsink off. Pretty sure, but without scratches all over it? Any tricks?

I like jumpers.

Reply 44122 of 45397, by chrismeyer6

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Cuttoon wrote on 2022-04-25, 01:33:
Price of a beer, most expensive Pentium 133 I bought since 1997. Ebay picture looks almost black and some others on the web look […]
Show full quote

Price of a beer, most expensive Pentium 133 I bought since 1997.
Ebay picture looks almost black and some others on the web look black and this one looks at least darker than many.
Were those differences batches, different production facilities or did they simply rip open a different shade of clay that day?

p133.JPGp133b.jpg

Ideal chip to test S7 boards - passive cooling, easy to handle, no heatsink attachment needed.
But still, I'm wondering if I could get that heatsink off. Pretty sure, but without scratches all over it? Any tricks?

I've had really good luck with the freezer method. I usually put the parts in the freezer over night and then the heatsink general twists off without much effort. But this is a your mileage may vary situation.

Reply 44123 of 45397, by Repo Man11

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chrismeyer6 wrote on 2022-04-25, 02:27:
Cuttoon wrote on 2022-04-25, 01:33:
Price of a beer, most expensive Pentium 133 I bought since 1997. Ebay picture looks almost black and some others on the web look […]
Show full quote

Price of a beer, most expensive Pentium 133 I bought since 1997.
Ebay picture looks almost black and some others on the web look black and this one looks at least darker than many.
Were those differences batches, different production facilities or did they simply rip open a different shade of clay that day?

p133.JPGp133b.jpg

Ideal chip to test S7 boards - passive cooling, easy to handle, no heatsink attachment needed.
But still, I'm wondering if I could get that heatsink off. Pretty sure, but without scratches all over it? Any tricks?

I've had really good luck with the freezer method. I usually put the parts in the freezer over night and then the heatsink general twists off without much effort. But this is a your mileage may vary situation.

Same here. I have a Pentium Pro that I got in a load of stuff that had a heat sink seemingly permanently bonded to it - one night in the freezer and it popped right off.

"Everyone is ignorant, only on different subjects." - Will Rogers

Reply 44124 of 45397, by TrashPanda

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Repo Man11 wrote on 2022-04-25, 02:49:
chrismeyer6 wrote on 2022-04-25, 02:27:
Cuttoon wrote on 2022-04-25, 01:33:
Price of a beer, most expensive Pentium 133 I bought since 1997. Ebay picture looks almost black and some others on the web look […]
Show full quote

Price of a beer, most expensive Pentium 133 I bought since 1997.
Ebay picture looks almost black and some others on the web look black and this one looks at least darker than many.
Were those differences batches, different production facilities or did they simply rip open a different shade of clay that day?

p133.JPGp133b.jpg

Ideal chip to test S7 boards - passive cooling, easy to handle, no heatsink attachment needed.
But still, I'm wondering if I could get that heatsink off. Pretty sure, but without scratches all over it? Any tricks?

I've had really good luck with the freezer method. I usually put the parts in the freezer over night and then the heatsink general twists off without much effort. But this is a your mileage may vary situation.

Same here. I have a Pentium Pro that I got in a load of stuff that had a heat sink seemingly permanently bonded to it - one night in the freezer and it popped right off.

Do you use the Pentium Pro ?

I have the chance to get a Pentium Pro 200 1mb system but im still deciding if its worth having it around, its a complete mini tower box so it might be fun to have as a collectible item, might even be worth sourcing a Pentium Pro Overdrive 333 for it too, assuming I can find one not priced stupidly.

Oh noes, the cap let the shmooo out 😁

Reply 44125 of 45397, by Repo Man11

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I don't have a motherboard for the Pentium Pro, and I have no idea if it works, though they seem like pretty robust CPUs so it probably does. Maybe I'll find a deal on a board for it someday.

"Everyone is ignorant, only on different subjects." - Will Rogers

Reply 44126 of 45397, by ChrisK

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Cuttoon wrote on 2022-04-25, 01:33:
Price of a beer, most expensive Pentium 133 I bought since 1997. Ebay picture looks almost black and some others on the web look […]
Show full quote

Price of a beer, most expensive Pentium 133 I bought since 1997.
Ebay picture looks almost black and some others on the web look black and this one looks at least darker than many.
Were those differences batches, different production facilities or did they simply rip open a different shade of clay that day?

p133.JPGp133b.jpg

Ideal chip to test S7 boards - passive cooling, easy to handle, no heatsink attachment needed.
But still, I'm wondering if I could get that heatsink off. Pretty sure, but without scratches all over it? Any tricks?

If thermal adhesive film was used soak it in IPA (isopropyl alcohol for all you Berliners 😉, still alcohol but still not advised to consume) and use some small wooden wedges which get inserted on one (and only one) side between chip and cooler and pressed in further bit by bit with some gentle pressure. After some time, minutes, hours, ..., the adhesive film will eventually give up and leave the chip without scratches. Just done it once that way but it worked surprisingly well and this little gem of a CPGA P60 was given free without the smallest scratch.

Reply 44127 of 45397, by TrashPanda

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Repo Man11 wrote on 2022-04-25, 09:14:

I don't have a motherboard for the Pentium Pro, and I have no idea if it works, though they seem like pretty robust CPUs so it probably does. Maybe I'll find a deal on a board for it someday.

I guess it would make for an excellent DOS/NT3.1 system, being the pinnacle of CPUs for that era before Intel switched to Slots and AGP.

Never had a working one myself so a complete working box will be nice to have in the collection and to show it off to friends that have an interest in old junk !

Oh noes, the cap let the shmooo out 😁

Reply 44128 of 45397, by chrismeyer6

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TrashPanda wrote on 2022-04-25, 06:02:
Repo Man11 wrote on 2022-04-25, 02:49:
chrismeyer6 wrote on 2022-04-25, 02:27:

I've had really good luck with the freezer method. I usually put the parts in the freezer over night and then the heatsink general twists off without much effort. But this is a your mileage may vary situation.

Same here. I have a Pentium Pro that I got in a load of stuff that had a heat sink seemingly permanently bonded to it - one night in the freezer and it popped right off.

Do you use the Pentium Pro ?

I have the chance to get a Pentium Pro 200 1mb system but im still deciding if its worth having it around, its a complete mini tower box so it might be fun to have as a collectible item, might even be worth sourcing a Pentium Pro Overdrive 333 for it too, assuming I can find one not priced stupidly.

If you have the chance at a complete working PPro system I'd grab it as they are fun to play around with.

Reply 44130 of 45397, by TrashPanda

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Kahenraz wrote on 2022-04-25, 12:22:

What is the incentive to use a Pentium Pro over a Pentium II, other than it being cool and unique?

None really other than I have a 1ghz Slot 1 P3 so I dont really need another slot based PC, the cool factor of a 1mb on package cache Pentium Pro is its draw factor(even the 333 OD only has 512k), its also rather rare to even see a working one since they mostly end up getting recycled for their gold. Finding a Pentium II 333 Overdrive for it at a reasonable price would pretty much be the icing on the cake, but I doubt very much I will ever see one in working condition below 500 USD so I may just bite the bullet and grab one eventually just to have it in the collection with this machine.

For me if I can save this one and keep it in working order then I feel I have done my bit to stop this rather rare and unusual beast being forgotten.

Also I really want to see how well it will run Quake with a Voodoo1 in it, I have a feeling it should soundly beat a P1 266 but how close to a PII will it get !

Oh noes, the cap let the shmooo out 😁

Reply 44131 of 45397, by RaverX

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Kahenraz wrote on 2022-04-25, 12:22:

What is the incentive to use a Pentium Pro over a Pentium II, other than it being cool and unique?

Time period correct, it's late 1995, PII is early 1997, more than 2 years difference. And that's (in my opinion) the most important thing, otherwise why would you use a PentiumII when you can use a PentiumIII (just one example).
Some games (made with Turbo Pascal) will run on a Pentium Pro (150, 166, 180), but won't run on a standard PII (without downclocking or applying a patch).
Also, some games/apps will run better on a PPro 200 MHz 1MB cache than on low end PII (233, even 266).

Reply 44132 of 45397, by Meatball

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Added a Radeon 7200 64MB SDR and Diamond 3D 4000 Virge GX2 4MB AGP to the collection. I was expecting 163/163MHz out of this Radeon, but it is clocked at 155/155MHz. The GX2 is 100/100MHz. Without any cooling, the GX2 overclocks stable at 112/112MHz. I bought this one to see for myself if Tomb Raider S3 version will run any better than with the Diamond 3D 2000 Pro PCI (Virge DX) I tested before.

Attachments

2080Ti
TitanXp/980Ti/260/7950GT-GX2/6800U/6200/5950U/4200/GF3-2/TNT1-2
3dfx 58-55-49-45-35-3-2K/100/2/Fusion/Rush/1/X-24/200SBi/100DB
ATI 75-7200/Rage MAXX-Fury-Ultra-GL-Pro-XL-LT
G400MAX-200/M220/Trio3D/VirgeGX2/DX
Verite V2100/PCX2-1
GLoria Synergy/I/II

Reply 44133 of 45397, by debs3759

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HanJammer wrote on 2022-04-25, 00:10:
debs3759 wrote on 2022-04-24, 22:51:

Any chance you could scan that ET1000 manual? I have the same model (it's made by DFI, not Addonics, they just put their branding on it).

Yeah, I will.

Thanks

See my graphics card database at www.gpuzoo.com
Constantly being worked on. Feel free to message me with any corrections or details of cards you would like me to research and add.

Reply 44134 of 45397, by brostenen

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After having softmodded that black Wii I bought, then I needed a classic type controller for emulation and that sort of stuff. So I found a Yoshi inspired (yes, why not) controller online for cheap. It plugs into the normal controller instead of the nunchuck.

Anyone interrested in how to softmod, then I can provide a link to the instructions that I used for the process. All it takes, is a SD card and internet connection. It happens with the use of a static gateway adress or something like that.

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Don't eat stuff off a 15 year old never cleaned cpu cooler.
Those cakes make you sick....

My blog: http://to9xct.blogspot.dk
My YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/brostenen

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Reply 44135 of 45397, by Gmlb256

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Meatball wrote on 2022-04-25, 14:48:

Added a Radeon 7200 64MB SDR and Diamond 3D 4000 Virge GX2 4MB AGP to the collection.

It would be interesting getting the PCI version of the ViRGE/GX2 which are rare. 😁

I bought this one to see for myself if Tomb Raider S3 version will run any better than with the Diamond 3D 2000 Pro PCI (Virge DX) I tested before.

Although it doesn't use EDO RAM, I have seen that it performs better than the ViRGE/DX in S3D games.

Reply 44136 of 45397, by Gmlb256

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Cuttoon wrote on 2022-04-25, 01:04:

That is indeed a really good SB16 model. It has the Vibra Pro chip, is very low noise but comes with that relatively rare, square low-power OPL3 - many did not and relied on shitty emulation.

Speaking of FM synth clones and emulations there are worse. CQM (the OPL3 clone used on later Creative ISA sound cards) is just a different way to implement FM synth through quadratic splines which gets around the patents and has little if not anything related to emulation.

Anyway, I prefer real OPL3 for FM synth over anything else.

Last edited by Gmlb256 on 2022-04-25, 23:02. Edited 1 time in total.

Reply 44137 of 45397, by PTherapist

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Got a couple of controllers, didn't spend a lot of money so they were just impulse buys:

Firstly a Logic 3 Top Drive 3-in-1 Steering Wheel Controller:

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Compatible with Sega Saturn, N64 & PS1 (plus some PS2 games). Also works on PC via a PS to USB adapter and I might even experiment and see if I can use it with Nintendon't for GameCube games on the Wii. It's not amazing by any stretch of the imagination, but it was quite cheap so why not.

And an Atari 7800 controller, stock web image because I couldn't be bothered taking a pic:

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Not a great controller, but again it was cheap. I already have the 7800 gamepad, so this will just be for some 2 player action.

Reply 44138 of 45397, by brian105

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Cuttoon wrote on 2022-04-25, 01:33:
Price of a beer, most expensive Pentium 133 I bought since 1997. Ebay picture looks almost black and some others on the web look […]
Show full quote

Price of a beer, most expensive Pentium 133 I bought since 1997.
Ebay picture looks almost black and some others on the web look black and this one looks at least darker than many.
Were those differences batches, different production facilities or did they simply rip open a different shade of clay that day?

p133.JPGp133b.jpg

Ideal chip to test S7 boards - passive cooling, easy to handle, no heatsink attachment needed.
But still, I'm wondering if I could get that heatsink off. Pretty sure, but without scratches all over it? Any tricks?

I used IPA and WD-40 to separate the heatsink from my K6-2. Use plastic picks to get some leverage as well, or even a flathead screwdriver if needed.

I cut my finger on a modem
Presario 5284: K6-2+ 550 ACZ @ 600 2v, 256MB PC133, GeForce4 MX 440SE 64MB, MVP3 chipset, Maxtor SATA/150 PCI card, 16GB Sandisk U100 SATA SSD, 20X DVD-ROM
Presario 2100: MediaGX 133, 24MB EDO, Quantum Bigfoot 2GB

Reply 44139 of 45397, by Cuttoon

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brian105 wrote on 2022-04-25, 20:42:
Cuttoon wrote on 2022-04-25, 01:33:
Price of a beer, most expensive Pentium 133 I bought since 1997. Ebay picture looks almost black and some others on the web look […]
Show full quote

Price of a beer, most expensive Pentium 133 I bought since 1997.
Ebay picture looks almost black and some others on the web look black and this one looks at least darker than many.
Were those differences batches, different production facilities or did they simply rip open a different shade of clay that day?

p133.JPGp133b.jpg

Ideal chip to test S7 boards - passive cooling, easy to handle, no heatsink attachment needed.
But still, I'm wondering if I could get that heatsink off. Pretty sure, but without scratches all over it? Any tricks?

I used IPA and WD-40 to separate the heatsink from my K6-2. Use plastic picks to get some leverage as well, or even a flathead screwdriver if needed.

Thank you all for the many hints, I shall try them out. So far, the freezer method sounded promising and elegant, but not with this bugger.
Don't think it's due to the cooling, but only just noticed there's a slight gap all around between heatsink and ceramics, so chemistry might get a grip there. Looks like it was just one blob of glue in the center.

Pretty sure it would yield to brute force, but the point is that I don't want to apply that.
If it doesn't work, I still have the pristine, rather expensive one from 1997 😉

I like jumpers.