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Bought these (retro) hardware today

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Reply 44300 of 45423, by chrismes

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I searched my local offers for cases I liked and stumbled over an acrylic case that looked okay. The guy wanted 50€ for it and also had a few other parts he wanted gone (for free).

So today I went to pick the stuff up and went home with an Asus P2B-DS, two Pentium III 550, a Gainward GeForce 3 and another dual Slot 1 Mainboard from HP. The guy told me they still worked when he put them away, but we'll see.

There's another intense cleaning session ahead.

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Reply 44301 of 45423, by Cuttoon

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chrismes wrote on 2022-05-02, 16:26:

I searched my local offers for cases I liked and stumbled over an acrylic case that looked okay. The guy wanted 50€ for it and also had a few other parts he wanted gone (for free).

So today I went to pick the stuff up and went home with an Asus P2B-DS, two Pentium III 550, a Gainward GeForce 3 and another dual Slot 1 Mainboard from HP. The guy told me they still worked when he put them away, but we'll see.

There's another intense cleaning session ahead.

Now, is that "bought" or "bought combined with dumpster find" or do we need a third thread?!?

That GF3 looks awesome. I would like to buy a custom ATX Snow White coffin, as well!

I like jumpers.

Reply 44302 of 45423, by luckybob

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a pair of dual cpu board! You stole those! As for the HP board, they are 99% the same as the consumer version Asus board. They change almost nothing save for some silk screening and the bios.

It is a mistake to think you can solve any major problems just with potatoes.

Reply 44303 of 45423, by chrismes

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He just gave me all this stuff because I wanted to buy the case. So I feel like I bought all of it.

I'm currently taking the case apart for cleaning and damn that thing is well made. Really thick walls and brass connections.

Reply 44304 of 45423, by Cuttoon

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luckybob wrote on 2022-05-02, 16:47:

a pair of dual cpu board! You stole those! As for the HP board, they are 99% the same as the consumer version Asus board. They change almost nothing save for some silk screening and the bios.

🤣, I'm such a sucker for old geforce cards that I didn't notice he skimmed off half a grand in rare mobos there 😁

I like jumpers.

Reply 44306 of 45423, by Cuttoon

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chrismes wrote on 2022-05-02, 16:54:

Someone replaced the cooler on the GF3 with a massive Socket 370 copper cooler they glued on. That thing is really heavy.

They glued that thing on?!?!?!? 😳
OK, I'm taking back all my praise for it. Some people just need to be g...ently reminded not to do such evil things.

I like jumpers.

Reply 44307 of 45423, by chrismes

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Yeah, I checked the GF3 and it turns out that cooler won't come off without killing the chip. They used epoxy or something. I'll clean the card and leave it as is. I also found the original invoice for the card in the bottom of the box all this stuff came in: it was 999,- Deutsche Mark.

Reply 44308 of 45423, by WJG6260

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As of late I've been on something of an RDRAM kick. I'm not sure why that is. I suppose it's just interesting technology and this old Anandtech review brought up some memories of discussions I'd had with friends back in the day that the i850E was essentially par with the i875, as mighty as the latter seems in retrospect.

I find this to be quite interesting, since RDRAM is basically maligned now--almost universally--as a great failure by Intel; it's seemingly heralded as one of the company's greatest missteps, and perhaps it is so. In actuality, and in terms of real-world use case scenarios, DDR RAM is certainly more useful and amenable. It provides the same--or greater--bandwidth without a number of downsides, including: RDRAM's excess heat; the requiring of RIMM pairings to function; and the narrow 16-bit bus on which RIMMs are based.

And yet, it's not that bad. After taking a gander at this chart from TomsHardware, I was sold on acquiring some hardware:

RAM Bandwidth Reference Sheet - TomsHardware.png
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It seems that PC800 in dual channel is really only matched by DDR400 single channel RAM or DDR266 in dual channel, the latter of which seems less impressive in terms of the grander comparison at hand; however, considering that dual-channel DDR chipsets weren't as common as dual-channel RDRAM chipsets at this time, the comparison grows a little more favorable for RDRAM's case.

As such, I went ahead and purchased the two boards you see here. The ASUS P4T-E is a nice one, being a reference model and a logical upgrade from my old P4T. Unfortunately, this one lacks the Cypress RDRAM clock generators required for PC1066 operation, but the FSB is stable at 133MHz without issue.

P4T-E Seller Pic.jpg
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The D850EMV2, however, is a monster of a board. It's stable, fast, and really easy to work with. It's surprisingly modern, offering something akin to today's "fast boot" and boy does it boot fast! I appreciate that this board can drive the 3.06GHz Northwood with HT, and I've got one on the way just to see how it does. Unfortunately, however, I have discovered that this board--whilst being of late enough revision to natively run PC1066--cannot handle more than 1.5GB of PC1066 RAM, confirmed by the issues another fellow member of the forum had here. (Check out this build by the way, it's quite nice!) Does anyone have any ideas as to why this is the case? Apparently, it's fine with 2GB of PC800, and other RDRAM boards based on the i850E are good to go with 2GB of PC1066.

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It's funny to me that I've gotten so deep into this niche now, and it all started with a search for an RDRAM Pentium III board! I've got one of those FIC KC-19+'s that can handle RDRAM and Pentium IIIs, but I'd really be interested in finding an ASUS P3C-E or some other i820-based board with ISA that's not a VC820 and can run a Tualatin one of these days; while RDRAM's bandwidth can't help the 133MHz FSB-driven PIII platform, I'm curious to see how these boards do with a Pentium III-S because RDRAM chipsets had a place in later Pentium III days, whereby the i820 could run a 133MHz FSB while keeping AGP in spec, unlike the fabled 440BX. I'm curious to compare one with i815 and see if it was worth it or not, especially since the i820 was awfully close to rivalling the 440BX in performance, just like the i815.

Anyway, that's enough rambling! I hope you found this somewhat interesting.

-Live Long and Prosper-

Feel free to check out my YouTube and Twitter!

Reply 44309 of 45423, by Shponglefan

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Got a boxed SoundBlaster 1.5.

I do love that 80's box styling, from the chrome logo to the ridiculous over-the-top marketing blurbs. Finally I can blast away that PC sound barrier! 😁

Interestingly it came with the Phillips SAA1099P chips installed, which I assume must have been an aftermarket addition?

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My YouTube channel (retro game music)

Reply 44310 of 45423, by Kahenraz

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chrismes wrote on 2022-05-02, 16:54:

Someone replaced the cooler on the GF3 with a massive Socket 370 copper cooler they glued on. That thing is really heavy.

That's silly. The GeForce 2 Ultra and GeForce 3 series didn't get very hot at all. Maybe the fan died or the previous owner wanted to do some crazy overclocking. It's a terrible waste of a good GPU regardless.

You could always try putting it in the freezer. I've never tried this personally, but I've heard a lot of positive anecdotes.

Reply 44311 of 45423, by TehGuy

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Joining the VisionRGB E2S gang this week. Managed to find a new fan (well, ordered 2 just in case) for the x800 I got for my PowerMac G5; old one was absolutely upset at being alive. Not surprising considering how dirty the thing was when I got it. Also got a VGA and DVI distribution amplifier/splitter/whatever for recording reasons. DOS/98 rig now up to a GeForce 4 MX460 from the GF 2 MX400; not that the 400 was a problem but the 460 was $30 and is _faster_ ignoring the fact it's on a AGP 2x slot

OSSC because i have problems with planning things out all the way through

Win98+DOS: VIA C3 Ezra-T 1.0AGHz / P3 866MHz, 128MB RAM, AWE64 + Orpheus, GeForce 4 MX 460, 128GB SD card
Win XP SP3: C2D E8500, 4GB RAM, X-Fi Titanium, GTX 750
PowerMac G4 QS 800MHz + GeForce4 Ti4200, OS 9
PowerMac G5 DP 1.8Ghz + ATi x800 XT, Leopard

Reply 44312 of 45423, by libby

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Kahenraz wrote on 2022-05-03, 01:28:
chrismes wrote on 2022-05-02, 16:54:

Someone replaced the cooler on the GF3 with a massive Socket 370 copper cooler they glued on. That thing is really heavy.

That's silly. The GeForce 2 Ultra and GeForce 3 series didn't get very hot at all. Maybe the fan died or the previous owner wanted to do some crazy overclocking. It's a terrible waste of a good GPU regardless.

You could always try putting it in the freezer. I've never tried this personally, but I've heard a lot of positive anecdotes.

I wouldn't think the GPU is wasted, giant copper cooler will still do the job epoxied on. all you're losing is one PCI slot, which is unlikely to be much of an issue in most builds unless you really really need that LAN, SCSI or SATA, dual voodoo2, sound card and... modem? heh

seconding freezer though, if you do want to remove the cooler. the epoxy typically becomes brittle at subzero temps and will break when a bit of leverage is applied. this tended to also work for epoxied athlon 64 and pentium 4 CPUs amongst others.

Reply 44313 of 45423, by BitWrangler

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Kahenraz wrote on 2022-05-03, 01:28:

and GeForce 3 series didn't get very hot at all.

Orly? Run a few passes of Aquamark on one then stick your finger on it.

Unicorn herding operations are proceeding, but all the totes of hens teeth and barrels of rocking horse poop give them plenty of hiding spots.

Reply 44315 of 45423, by pan069

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Shponglefan wrote on 2022-05-03, 00:58:

Got a boxed SoundBlaster 1.5.

I do love that 80's box styling, from the chrome logo to the ridiculous over-the-top marketing blurbs. Finally I can blast away that PC sound barrier! 😁

Interestingly it came with the Phillips SAA1099P chips installed, which I assume must have been an aftermarket addition?

Cool item! Jealous. 😀

Reply 44316 of 45423, by Meatball

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I completed my set of 66MHz Celerons, from the original 266MHz up to the 766MHz. I also picked up another Slocket - I like the Pentium II casing on this one.

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GLoria Synergy/I/II

Reply 44317 of 45423, by Trev-MUN

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chrismes wrote on 2022-05-02, 16:26:

I searched my local offers for cases I liked and stumbled over an acrylic case that looked okay.

Oh dude, that's awesome! I've kind of been thinking about, just for grins (when I have the living space for it at least) building a PC made with as many UV reactive parts as possible. I remember they used to sell cases like this, some of them in UV acrylic too. They seem to be rarer than unicorns these days ...

Reply 44318 of 45423, by TrashPanda

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WJG6260 wrote on 2022-05-03, 00:15:
As of late I've been on something of an RDRAM kick. I'm not sure why that is. I suppose it's just interesting technology and thi […]
Show full quote

As of late I've been on something of an RDRAM kick. I'm not sure why that is. I suppose it's just interesting technology and this old Anandtech review brought up some memories of discussions I'd had with friends back in the day that the i850E was essentially par with the i875, as mighty as the latter seems in retrospect.

I find this to be quite interesting, since RDRAM is basically maligned now--almost universally--as a great failure by Intel; it's seemingly heralded as one of the company's greatest missteps, and perhaps it is so. In actuality, and in terms of real-world use case scenarios, DDR RAM is certainly more useful and amenable. It provides the same--or greater--bandwidth without a number of downsides, including: RDRAM's excess heat; the requiring of RIMM pairings to function; and the narrow 16-bit bus on which RIMMs are based.

And yet, it's not that bad. After taking a gander at this chart from TomsHardware, I was sold on acquiring some hardware: RAM Bandwidth Reference Sheet - TomsHardware.png It seems that PC800 in dual channel is really only matched by DDR400 single channel RAM or DDR266 in dual channel, the latter of which seems less impressive in terms of the grander comparison at hand; however, considering that dual-channel DDR chipsets weren't as common as dual-channel RDRAM chipsets at this time, the comparison grows a little more favorable for RDRAM's case.

As such, I went ahead and purchased the two boards you see here. The ASUS P4T-E is a nice one, being a reference model and a logical upgrade from my old P4T. Unfortunately, this one lacks the Cypress RDRAM clock generators required for PC1066 operation, but the FSB is stable at 133MHz without issue.
P4T-E Seller Pic.jpg

The D850EMV2, however, is a monster of a board. It's stable, fast, and really easy to work with. It's surprisingly modern, offering something akin to today's "fast boot" and boy does it boot fast! I appreciate that this board can drive the 3.06GHz Northwood with HT, and I've got one on the way just to see how it does. Unfortunately, however, I have discovered that this board--whilst being of late enough revision to natively run PC1066--cannot handle more than 1.5GB of PC1066 RAM, confirmed by the issues another fellow member of the forum had here. (Check out this build by the way, it's quite nice!) Does anyone have any ideas as to why this is the case? Apparently, it's fine with 2GB of PC800, and other RDRAM boards based on the i850E are good to go with 2GB of PC1066.

D850EMV2 Seller Pic.jpg

It's funny to me that I've gotten so deep into this niche now, and it all started with a search for an RDRAM Pentium III board! I've got one of those FIC KC-19+'s that can handle RDRAM and Pentium IIIs, but I'd really be interested in finding an ASUS P3C-E or some other i820-based board with ISA that's not a VC820 and can run a Tualatin one of these days; while RDRAM's bandwidth can't help the 133MHz FSB-driven PIII platform, I'm curious to see how these boards do with a Pentium III-S because RDRAM chipsets had a place in later Pentium III days, whereby the i820 could run a 133MHz FSB while keeping AGP in spec, unlike the fabled 440BX. I'm curious to compare one with i815 and see if it was worth it or not, especially since the i820 was awfully close to rivalling the 440BX in performance, just like the i815.

Anyway, that's enough rambling! I hope you found this somewhat interesting.

I have a bunch of Rimms from a huge batch of SDRAM I bought and have been looking for a Tually board capable of running RDRAM looks like I will have to look for a slot 1 board that has Rimm support since RDRAM Tually boards appear to be as rare as DDR based ones. I guess I could fire up a Willamette based build but I dont honestly like P4s enough to drop cash on a Rimm based board for one.

I do havea board that can run FC SDRAM but I have yet to find any FC SDRAM to put into it to see if its any faster than normal SDRAM, one day I shall find some on eBay finger crossed !

Oh noes, the cap let the shmooo out 😁

Reply 44319 of 45423, by igna78

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Meatball wrote on 2022-05-03, 02:53:

I completed my set of 66MHz Celerons, from the original 266MHz up to the 766MHz. I also picked up another Slocket - I like the Pentium II casing on this one.

Congratulations: a nice collection that traces the history of a CPU that made so many people happy in the Slot1/Socket370 era 😄

Low cost, good overclocking and good gaming performance - good times 😄

In 1998 I was a happy boy with Abit BH6 + Celeron 300A ❤️