VOGONS


First post, by Stojke

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How though would it be to replace an damaged ISA slot on an GA486AM/S motherboard?

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Sorry for high quality image 😀

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Reply 3 of 17, by Stojke

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The plastic bended 10 pins the opposite way and now they dont align with the others 😀
Tried to force them back but no luck.

I bought this board to resell it but i guess im out of luck 🤣

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Reply 5 of 17, by Stojke

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I am thinking of sending the board to a friend of mine who has such tools. But how pleased would somebody be with an modified motherboard?

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Reply 6 of 17, by luckybob

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Stojke wrote:

I am thinking of sending the board to a friend of mine who has such tools. But how pleased would somebody be with an modified motherboard?

well, it depends on how you spin it. If you tell people you frankensteined parts from another board to make this one work, and this is just an average board, people probably won't like it.

I'd stay away from the words salvage, solder,de-solder, etc. Just say you fixed a broken slot.

It is a mistake to think you can solve any major problems just with potatoes.

Reply 7 of 17, by Robin4

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Stojke wrote:

I am thinking of sending the board to a friend of mine who has such tools. But how pleased would somebody be with an modified motherboard?

Why should anybody care? Why should de-solder/ solder dont do anything good to the part..
If i should buy a part like this, i should be more angry on the fact if there is been messed with the bios chips.. Some people do think that it would `been compatible` with every other 286 / 386 board. But thats itsnt true..
This is due to if the board is using the same chipset.. You cant just use an bios from an opti chipset and using it on an UMC one..
But there is nothing bad about to repair an ISA slot for an new one..Its stil is an ISA slot..
As long as you clean solder, there is not much to complain to the purchasing side.

And the other think is just to be honest when you selling to board.. Not going to lie about you want to see it..
And provide enough and clear infomation when you going to sell the board.

~ At least it can do black and white~

Reply 8 of 17, by Stojke

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Honestly, i share the same opinion. As long as it works and is done well no problem.
This model is pretty good from what I read, would be a shame to throw it away 😀

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Reply 9 of 17, by Logistics

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Find a replacement card-edge slot with GOLD-PLATED contacts, and say you upgraded that slot for use with quality sound cards or fast ISA graphics adapters.

Reply 11 of 17, by luckybob

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Logistics wrote:

Find a replacement card-edge slot with GOLD-PLATED contacts, and say you upgraded that slot for use with quality sound cards or fast ISA graphics adapters.

+1

It is a mistake to think you can solve any major problems just with potatoes.

Reply 12 of 17, by Auzner

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Use a solder pot or a heatgun. The slot is bad anyways so melting the plastic won't matter. Just don't hit the adjacent slots! If you do this correctly, with a matching part, and it tests working, don't even mention you replaced the slot. It's extra info practically nobody needs to worry about. Unfortunately if you've never done this before it probably won't look factory your first try. The effort involved is up to you.

Reply 13 of 17, by Stojke

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If only they existed 😁

Thats the only thing i am afraid off, if i use too much heat i could bend the board or overheat something.
I never really practiced with an heat gun before. But i have spare ISA slots from old IBM computers. I also have some white ones 😀

[edit]

White ones are yellow (gold plated)! 🤣

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Reply 14 of 17, by DNSDies

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Use one of these, if you do a lot of desoldering:
http://www.amazon.com/Hakko-808-KIT-Contained … l/dp/B00FZPTEK2

$180 may seem like a lot, but if you've ever tried to desolder a double sided ground pin before with bad tools, you'll know it's not a bad price.

Desoldering the ground pin will be the hardest part, since the entire ground plane of the board will wick away heat from the solder.
You'll either have to heat up and mix in a low temp solder, or use a gun like I listed above to reliably desolder those.

Reply 15 of 17, by Stojke

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That looks pretty cool! I always wanted an automated desoldering tool. I have an analogue model, but it tends to overheat things before it becomes useful. I practiced on an older motherboard and it made marks in the PCB.

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Reply 16 of 17, by DNSDies

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The trick to easy desoldering is high heat, intense suction, and very little contact with the actual PCB.

I find it helps to add new solder to old points, simply because it helps the older stuff flow easier, and gives your desoldering iron something to melt without jamming it into the PCB and praying you don't lift the traces.