VOGONS


First post, by bluejeans

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A crude method of test: - Get Puppy Linux, and install it to a USB pendrive. - Boot puppy and get Wakepup2 (it's a floppy boot d […]
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A crude method of test:
- Get Puppy Linux, and install it to a USB pendrive.
- Boot puppy and get Wakepup2 (it's a floppy boot disk).

Insert wakepup2 floppy, and the Puppy pendrive. The floppy runs under DOS, and has A LOT of USB drivers. You may use it to check what drivers (if any) works with your hardware.

(BTW: I guess that you will need only Wakepup to see if it read your USB disk)

I just want to use a usb keyboard and mouse after the system has already detected AT/serial ones plugged in.

Reply 1 of 1, by .legaCy

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bluejeans wrote:
A crude method of test: - Get Puppy Linux, and install it to a USB pendrive. - Boot puppy and get Wakepup2 (it's a floppy boot d […]
Show full quote

A crude method of test:
- Get Puppy Linux, and install it to a USB pendrive.
- Boot puppy and get Wakepup2 (it's a floppy boot disk).

Insert wakepup2 floppy, and the Puppy pendrive. The floppy runs under DOS, and has A LOT of USB drivers. You may use it to check what drivers (if any) works with your hardware.

(BTW: I guess that you will need only Wakepup to see if it read your USB disk)

I just want to use a usb keyboard and mouse after the system has already detected AT/serial ones plugged in.

I don't know about this but if your motherboard has built in usb and the "Legacy USB Support"(or something like that) it will work under dos without any shenanigans.
but if not, well give it a try.

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