VOGONS


First post, by Intel486dx33

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I saw this computer on auction and I bid on it but it sold to a higher bidder.

Does anyone know anything about this computer ?

Why is it called an “investor”

It’s an IBM PS/1 Investor tower.

Originally came with a 486dx2-66.

What is the difference between the “investor” model and the “value” model ?

Photos from sellers posts.

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Reply 3 of 18, by Caluser2000

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The maintenance manual is readily available like any other in the PS/1 line up. Basicly just an IBM branded 486 tower with pretty standard components and a silly name.

There's a glitch in the matrix.
A founding member of the 286 appreciation society.
Apparently 32-bit is dead and nobody likes P4s.
Of course, as always, I'm open to correction...😉

Reply 4 of 18, by Anonymous Coward

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Ha, I didn't know creative labled 6x CD-ROM drives as "hex" speed. I guess their marketing team wasn't as uptight as Intel's, who avoided calling the 686 a "hexium", and relabled the 666MHz model as the 667 so not to alienate their Christian customers.

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Reply 5 of 18, by Intel486dx33

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Caluser2000 wrote:

The maintenance manual is readily available like any other in the PS/1 line up. Basicly just an IBM branded 486 tower with pretty standard components and a silly name.

Yes, I understand it’s a PS/1 model 2168-P89 but why did they call it an “investor” ?
Not all model 2168 are labeled “investor”.

Link:
http://ps-2.kev009.com/pcpartnerinfo/ctstips/c776.htm

Spring 1994 IBM PS/1 models in the Spring 1994 product line: 2133-18A, 20C, 21C, 23C, 52D 2155-RS1 2168-38C, 57C w/Aria sound ca […]
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Spring 1994
IBM PS/1 models in the Spring 1994 product line:
2133-18A, 20C, 21C, 23C, 52D
2155-RS1
2168-38C, 57C
w/Aria sound card
2155-CC1
2168-BB1, US1
w/Sound Blaster sound card
2155-77C, 79C, 87C, NM1, RS2
2168-SR1

Reply 6 of 18, by Caluser2000

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I did mention silly name.

Intel486dx33 wrote:

I'd never had guessed. I'm quite well aware of PS/1 specs. I've had a few myself. Not particularly interesting systems really. Pretty average at the time apart from the first PS/1s series which were odd, or is that unique, in the way they were assembled.

Last edited by Caluser2000 on 2019-09-26, 03:56. Edited 3 times in total.

There's a glitch in the matrix.
A founding member of the 286 appreciation society.
Apparently 32-bit is dead and nobody likes P4s.
Of course, as always, I'm open to correction...😉

Reply 8 of 18, by Intel486dx33

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Oh, I see. It just has to do with the stores from which they where sold ? And slight configuration changes.

The “IBM PS/1 “Consultant” are usually 486sx-25 CPU with 4mb ram and ET4000 graphics. 8kb cache. With NO cache upgrade available. CPU upgradable with Intel overdrive OPD486SX-25 486sx25@50mhz. With NO Math-co processor Or Intel DX20DP66 overdrive with Math-co Processor or Intel DX40DP75 Overdrive CPU.

The “IBM Essential” is a 486dx CPU with 8mb ram and Cirrus logic 542x video with cache upgrade up to 256kb.
CPU upgradable with Intel 486dx2-66 or 486dx4-100 Overdrive CPU.

The “IBM Multimedia” edition comes with a 486dx-50 CPU, 8mb ram and upgradable to 256kb cache.
CPU upgradable with Intel 486dx2-66 or 486dx4-100 Overdrive CPU.

So this “IBM PS/1 Investor” must have been a highly upgradable version. Originally came with a 486dx2-66 CPU, 8mb ram. Cache upgradeable to at least 256kb.
CPU upgradable with Intel 486dx2-66 or 486dx4-100 Overdrive CPU or Pentium Overdrive CPU.

So you want to stay away from the IBM PS/1 Consultant “Value” model.( low end model ).
And the “Investor” being the top of the line PS/1.

Low end to High lists:
PS/1 expert ( small case, 25MHz/20MHz Intel i386SX) ( 1993 )
PS/1 Consultant - Value, 486sx-25 ( 1993 )
PS/1 Advisor
Ps/1 Essential 486dx ( 1993 )
PS/1 486dx Multimedia with sound blaster and 2x CDROM ( 1994 )
PS/1 486dx Investor with Sound Blaster and 6x CDROM ( 1994 )

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Reply 9 of 18, by SpectriaForce

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Anonymous Coward wrote:

I guess their marketing team wasn't as uptight as Intel's, who avoided calling the 686 a "hexium", and relabled the 666MHz model as the 667 so not to alienate their Christian customers.

Lol I didn't know that 🤣 Oh the evil Pentium III 666 😈 I thought that they sold it as a 667 because the actual clock speed is 666.66 MHz.

for my clearance sale of old pc hardware click here

Reply 10 of 18, by SpectriaForce

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Intel486dx33 wrote:
Oh, I see. It just has to do with the stores from which they where sold ? And slight configuration changes. […]
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Oh, I see. It just has to do with the stores from which they where sold ? And slight configuration changes.

The “IBM PS/1 “Consultant” are usually 486sx-25 CPU with 4mb ram and ET4000 graphics. 8kb cache. With NO cache upgrade available. CPU upgradable with Intel overdrive OPD486SX-25 486sx25@50mhz. With NO Math-co processor Or Intel DX20DP66 overdrive with Math-co Processor or Intel DX40DP75 Overdrive CPU.

The “IBM Essential” is a 486dx CPU with 8mb ram and Cirrus logic 542x video with cache upgrade up to 256kb.
CPU upgradable with Intel 486dx2-66 or 486dx4-100 Overdrive CPU.

The “IBM Multimedia” edition comes with a 486dx-50 CPU, 8mb ram and upgradable to 256kb cache.
CPU upgradable with Intel 486dx2-66 or 486dx4-100 Overdrive CPU.

So this “IBM PS/1 Investor” must have been a highly upgradable version. Originally came with a 486dx2-66 CPU, 8mb ram. Cache upgradeable to at least 256kb.
CPU upgradable with Intel 486dx2-66 or 486dx4-100 Overdrive CPU or Pentium Overdrive CPU.

So you want to stay away from the IBM PS/1 Consultant “Value” model.( low end model ).
And the “Investor” being the top of the line PS/1.

Low end to High lists:
PS/1 expert ( small case, 25MHz/20MHz Intel i386SX) ( 1993 )
PS/1 Consultant - Value, 486sx-25 ( 1993 )
PS/1 Advisor
Ps/1 Essential 486dx ( 1993 )
PS/1 486dx Multimedia with sound blaster and 2x CDROM ( 1994 )
PS/1 486dx Investor with Sound Blaster and 6x CDROM ( 1994 )

Reading the old article in that magazine, it seems that the Valuepoint is another model, targeted at the low end of the corporate market (less expansion options). The PS/1 is a consumer friendly version of the Valuepoint (with additional software). I find the PS/1 names very confusing, not sure what for stuff they were smoking at IBM 🤣

for my clearance sale of old pc hardware click here

Reply 11 of 18, by H3nrik V!

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Intel486dx33 wrote:

The “IBM PS/1 “Consultant” are usually 486sx-25 CPU with 4mb ram and ET4000 graphics. 8kb cache. With NO cache upgrade available. CPU upgradable with Intel overdrive OPD486SX-25 486sx25@50mhz. With NO Math-co processor Or Intel DX20DP66 overdrive with Math-co Processor or Intel DX40DP75 Overdrive CPU.

I'm almost certain that also the odp486sx has fpu. First generation Overdrives were AFAIK named after the series, they were supposed to update rather than what they actually were ..

Please use the "quote" option if asking questions to what I write - it will really up the chances of me noticing 😀

Reply 13 of 18, by red_avatar

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Bah I envy you Americans! You get such cheap old school hardware showing up for peanuts while us Europeans have to shell out 3-4 times as much for similar hardware except it's a lot less likely to hit the market!

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Reply 14 of 18, by Caluser2000

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Errius wrote:

14" monitor @ 1024x768.

What must that have done to people's eyesight?

800 x 600 was more realistic. Even then the IBM monitors were'nt that great. Much better off with a VeiwSonic. Even some of the more gereric brands of monitors were better.

There's a glitch in the matrix.
A founding member of the 286 appreciation society.
Apparently 32-bit is dead and nobody likes P4s.
Of course, as always, I'm open to correction...😉

Reply 15 of 18, by H3nrik V!

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Errius wrote:

14" monitor @ 1024x768.

What must that have done to people's eyesight?

I ran 1024x768 on a 14 inch back in the days .. And it only ran that at 77? Hz INTERLACED 🤣

Please use the "quote" option if asking questions to what I write - it will really up the chances of me noticing 😀

Reply 16 of 18, by ph4nt0m

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red_avatar wrote:

Bah I envy you Americans! You get such cheap old school hardware showing up for peanuts while us Europeans have to shell out 3-4 times as much for similar hardware except it's a lot less likely to hit the market!

Well, $255 for the tower + postage + sales tax isn't exactly cheap, but it's a very nice retro machine anyway. Although IBM has more interesting machines to offer in their PS/2 model line. I've got myself recently a PS/2 Model 77s (9577) with the Lacuna planar for $33 + $30 postage because the seller was from a bordering state. A little bit rusty, but working and that's what matters most.

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Reply 17 of 18, by Intel486dx33

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ph4nt0m wrote:
red_avatar wrote:

Bah I envy you Americans! You get such cheap old school hardware showing up for peanuts while us Europeans have to shell out 3-4 times as much for similar hardware except it's a lot less likely to hit the market!

Well, $255 for the tower + postage + sales tax isn't exactly cheap, but it's a very nice retro machine anyway. Although IBM has more interesting machines to offer in their PS/2 model line. I've got myself recently a PS/2 Model 77s (9577) with the Lacuna planar for $33 + $30 postage because the seller was from a bordering state. A little bit rusty, but working and that's what matters most.

Ah, so your the lucky buyer. Good luck with this nice machine.

Reply 18 of 18, by ph4nt0m

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Intel486dx33 wrote:
ph4nt0m wrote:
red_avatar wrote:

Bah I envy you Americans! You get such cheap old school hardware showing up for peanuts while us Europeans have to shell out 3-4 times as much for similar hardware except it's a lot less likely to hit the market!

Well, $255 for the tower + postage + sales tax isn't exactly cheap, but it's a very nice retro machine anyway. Although IBM has more interesting machines to offer in their PS/2 model line. I've got myself recently a PS/2 Model 77s (9577) with the Lacuna planar for $33 + $30 postage because the seller was from a bordering state. A little bit rusty, but working and that's what matters most.

Ah, so your the lucky buyer. Good luck with this nice machine.

Nah, I watched the auction on this PS/1 because I bought many IBM parts from this seller in the past, but didn't bid because the price went way too high in the final minutes.

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