VOGONS


PSU Voltage Concerns

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Reply 20 of 23, by 386SX

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From my experience I can agree with many saying the Barton 3200+ and the Thunderbird 1400 really requires a 5V strong good quality PSU which specifications are real and possibly dedicated for those cpus. I don't know if nowdays some PSU manufacturer did some serious 5V strong/ripples free model out there, but with the ones I tried (nothing expensive but also some low end Corsair one) the 5V line went really down too much and ended up using some Enermax of those times that really had no problem (if they still works). Also the Athlon cpu I suppose had mostly no power saving logic and from what I can remember even in idle/desktop with a low end vga, it draws from the wall plug 110W the whole computer to goes up depending on the vga and the gpu load. But the cpu load actually didn't stress much more the wattage if I remember correctly. What it requires, it requires it all the time with no variation, this might be also something to consider. Lately I tried a P4 Northwood @ 3Ghz and while it was heavy too on the PSU, in linux it had a kernel module to adjust freqs/voltages and in idle the wattage went down to 80W for the whole computer.
Also the ripple thing for the retro boards it'd be interesting to know which modern cheap psu has been tested to be safe beside the 5V wattage requirement to use with a very old mainboard like an AT one.

Reply 21 of 23, by gdjacobs

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That Jeantech is using Teapo capacitors. They're second tier but probably fine in this application (assuming there's a good path for air past that toroidal choke). Other than not going with Jap caps, it doesn't look like they skimped much component wise. The board looks fully populated and everything seems well sized for the load. I really like the two stages of input protection with the nice filter can.

There's a lot of things to like about this supply, but the two big questions are 1) what's airflow like across the output filter section (top board in the first picture) and 2) how much service has it already put in. Even good caps need replacement when they're really long in the tooth.

All hail the Great Capacitor Brand Finder

Reply 22 of 23, by janskjaer

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@gdjacobs - Some really good points there. I was anticipating the capacitors not to have been of the highest quality, but certainly a standard above the rest. I agree that the build quality is rather high and they've really gone all out on the components.

To answer your question, it has seen 0 hours. It's brand new old stock. Hence the consideration for using over the very, very used Seasonic which looks like it has seen regular usage for the past 14 years.

The Jeantech also appears to have been designed in a time when PSUs were being catered for Socket A era boards. Just small features such as a floppy connector and a total of 2 SATA connectors, which is in stark contrast to the Seasonic.

Regarding the air flow, because I've not used the PSU yet, I cannot comment on it. Because there are a lot of components in there in addition to the inverted ones, it does seem a little cramped. How can I monitor this throughout its usage? Periodic temperature checks?
It has dual 80mm fans and due to the PSU being situated in the base of the case, the base fan will be facing up into the case (rather than suffocating itself by facing down), pulling from a good, strong air flow through the case from the front (via 2x 120mm fans) and flowing through to the rear (purged by a rear 120mm fan).

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Reply 23 of 23, by gdjacobs

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janskjaer wrote on 2020-07-03, 09:46:

Regarding the air flow, because I've not used the PSU yet, I cannot comment on it. Because there are a lot of components in there in addition to the inverted ones, it does seem a little cramped. How can I monitor this throughout its usage? Periodic temperature checks?
It has dual 80mm fans and due to the PSU being situated in the base of the case, the base fan will be facing up into the case (rather than suffocating itself by facing down), pulling from a good, strong air flow through the case from the front (via 2x 120mm fans) and flowing through to the rear (purged by a rear 120mm fan).

You probably could see the air path with a smoke generator, but I think a lot is common sense. I can't see very clearly if the path is blocked by a heat sink oriented the wrong way around.

Since it's NOS, I think this PSU will give you years of good service (unless it has airflow problems or other issues not shown in the pics).

All hail the Great Capacitor Brand Finder