VOGONS


First post, by Brute389

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I understand there has been an in-depth look at 802.11g and WPA2 support on this site as well as other sites, and I have been seriously considering some of the models reccommending in those posts. However, I wanted to see if there was any evidence that 802.11n cards might work with win98. It appears some individuals were interested in looking into the matter, but I want to ask if anyone has come up with any results on the subject? Thanks.

Reply 2 of 12, by darry

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Brute389 wrote on 2020-09-19, 01:27:

I understand there has been an in-depth look at 802.11g and WPA2 support on this site as well as other sites, and I have been seriously considering some of the models reccommending in those posts. However, I wanted to see if there was any evidence that 802.11n cards might work with win98. It appears some individuals were interested in looking into the matter, but I want to ask if anyone has come up with any results on the subject? Thanks.

According to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_802.11n-2009 , the first draft approved draft of 802.11N was in November 2006, which is after Windows 98SE's and Windows Millennium end of life ( July 11, 2006) . Someone releasing drivers for a new product for an EOL operating system is unlikely . Unless a given card's drivers for newer operating system happen to work under Windows 9x , you are unlikely to get 802.11n under Windows 9x .

That said, there exist wireless client-bridge type devices that will allow any Ethernet equipped device, regardless of operating system, to connect to a wireless network . Some of those support 802.11n and likely faster/newer standards . Alternatively, one can make a client-bridge device using a DD-WRT or OpenWRT compatible router .

Reply 3 of 12, by Brute389

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darry wrote on 2020-09-19, 01:51:
Brute389 wrote on 2020-09-19, 01:27:

I understand there has been an in-depth look at 802.11g and WPA2 support on this site as well as other sites, and I have been seriously considering some of the models reccommending in those posts. However, I wanted to see if there was any evidence that 802.11n cards might work with win98. It appears some individuals were interested in looking into the matter, but I want to ask if anyone has come up with any results on the subject? Thanks.

According to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_802.11n-2009 , the first draft approved draft of 802.11N was in November 2006, which is after Windows 98SE's and Windows Millennium end of life ( July 11, 2006) . Someone releasing drivers for a new product for an EOL operating system is unlikely . Unless a given card's drivers for newer operating system happen to work under Windows 9x , you are unlikely to get 802.11n under Windows 9x .

That said, there exist wireless client-bridge type devices that will allow any Ethernet equipped device, regardless of operating system, to connect to a wireless network . Some of those support 802.11n and likely faster/newer standards . Alternatively, one can make a client-bridge device using a DD-WRT or OpenWRT compatible router .

Interesting, so would that mean I would connect a laptop to via ethernet to a device to achieve a connection? Are there portable versions of such devices because I'm interested in using on with an old laptop and would like to preserve portability.

Reply 4 of 12, by darry

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wiretap wrote on 2020-09-19, 01:43:

Airlink AWLC6070 might work. Looks like it has a Win9x driver package available.

The only driver pack I could find does not have Windows 9x drivers .

It is Airlink101_AWL6070_20080125_.zip from driverguide.com

Reply 5 of 12, by darry

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Brute389 wrote on 2020-09-19, 02:01:
darry wrote on 2020-09-19, 01:51:
Brute389 wrote on 2020-09-19, 01:27:

I understand there has been an in-depth look at 802.11g and WPA2 support on this site as well as other sites, and I have been seriously considering some of the models reccommending in those posts. However, I wanted to see if there was any evidence that 802.11n cards might work with win98. It appears some individuals were interested in looking into the matter, but I want to ask if anyone has come up with any results on the subject? Thanks.

According to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_802.11n-2009 , the first draft approved draft of 802.11N was in November 2006, which is after Windows 98SE's and Windows Millennium end of life ( July 11, 2006) . Someone releasing drivers for a new product for an EOL operating system is unlikely . Unless a given card's drivers for newer operating system happen to work under Windows 9x , you are unlikely to get 802.11n under Windows 9x .

That said, there exist wireless client-bridge type devices that will allow any Ethernet equipped device, regardless of operating system, to connect to a wireless network . Some of those support 802.11n and likely faster/newer standards . Alternatively, one can make a client-bridge device using a DD-WRT or OpenWRT compatible router .

Interesting, so would that mean I would connect a laptop to via ethernet to a device to achieve a connection? Are there portable versions of such devices because I'm interested in using on with an old laptop and would like to preserve portability.

I do not know if there are battery-powered ones, if that is what you mean, but there are definitely relatively small DD-WRT and/or OpenWRT compatible WIFI routers that could be considered "portable" while still requiring AC power .

Reply 6 of 12, by Brute389

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darry wrote on 2020-09-19, 02:02:
wiretap wrote on 2020-09-19, 01:43:

Airlink AWLC6070 might work. Looks like it has a Win9x driver package available.

The only driver pack I could find does not have Windows 9x drivers .

It is Airlink101_AWL6070_20080125_.zip from driverguide.com

I looked at the AWLC6070 actually earlier. I heard that somebody said they got it working with win98; however, I found the manual and it doesn't list win98 as supported.

Reply 7 of 12, by Brute389

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darry wrote on 2020-09-19, 02:06:
Brute389 wrote on 2020-09-19, 02:01:
darry wrote on 2020-09-19, 01:51:

According to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_802.11n-2009 , the first draft approved draft of 802.11N was in November 2006, which is after Windows 98SE's and Windows Millennium end of life ( July 11, 2006) . Someone releasing drivers for a new product for an EOL operating system is unlikely . Unless a given card's drivers for newer operating system happen to work under Windows 9x , you are unlikely to get 802.11n under Windows 9x .

That said, there exist wireless client-bridge type devices that will allow any Ethernet equipped device, regardless of operating system, to connect to a wireless network . Some of those support 802.11n and likely faster/newer standards . Alternatively, one can make a client-bridge device using a DD-WRT or OpenWRT compatible router .

Interesting, so would that mean I would connect a laptop to via ethernet to a device to achieve a connection? Are there portable versions of such devices because I'm interested in using on with an old laptop and would like to preserve portability.

I do not know if there are battery-powered ones, if that is what you mean, but there are definitely relatively small DD-WRT and/or OpenWRT compatible WIFI routers that could be considered "portable" while still requiring AC power .

Yeah that's the unfortunate thing when researching this for laptops as I would like to preserve the portability but it sounds like I will have to make compromises somewhere 🙁.

Reply 8 of 12, by Stiletto

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darry wrote on 2020-09-19, 02:06:
Brute389 wrote on 2020-09-19, 02:01:
darry wrote on 2020-09-19, 01:51:

According to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_802.11n-2009 , the first draft approved draft of 802.11N was in November 2006, which is after Windows 98SE's and Windows Millennium end of life ( July 11, 2006) . Someone releasing drivers for a new product for an EOL operating system is unlikely . Unless a given card's drivers for newer operating system happen to work under Windows 9x , you are unlikely to get 802.11n under Windows 9x .

That said, there exist wireless client-bridge type devices that will allow any Ethernet equipped device, regardless of operating system, to connect to a wireless network . Some of those support 802.11n and likely faster/newer standards . Alternatively, one can make a client-bridge device using a DD-WRT or OpenWRT compatible router .

Interesting, so would that mean I would connect a laptop to via ethernet to a device to achieve a connection? Are there portable versions of such devices because I'm interested in using on with an old laptop and would like to preserve portability.

I do not know if there are battery-powered ones, if that is what you mean, but there are definitely relatively small DD-WRT and/or OpenWRT compatible WIFI routers that could be considered "portable" while still requiring AC power .

There's USB powered WiFi repeater/bridges.

Something like this, tho I don't have any experience with this specific one: https://www.amazon.com/Wireless-Ethernet-Netw … r/dp/B01GF6GST4

I know they've been discussed somewhere on VOGONS.

"I see a little silhouette-o of a man, Scaramouche, Scaramouche, will you
do the Fandango!" - Queen

Stiletto

Reply 9 of 12, by Brute389

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Stiletto wrote on 2020-09-19, 02:45:
There's USB powered WiFi repeater/bridges. […]
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darry wrote on 2020-09-19, 02:06:
Brute389 wrote on 2020-09-19, 02:01:

Interesting, so would that mean I would connect a laptop to via ethernet to a device to achieve a connection? Are there portable versions of such devices because I'm interested in using on with an old laptop and would like to preserve portability.

I do not know if there are battery-powered ones, if that is what you mean, but there are definitely relatively small DD-WRT and/or OpenWRT compatible WIFI routers that could be considered "portable" while still requiring AC power .

There's USB powered WiFi repeater/bridges.

Something like this, tho I don't have any experience with this specific one: https://www.amazon.com/Wireless-Ethernet-Netw … r/dp/B01GF6GST4

I know they've been discussed somewhere on VOGONS.

Thats interesting that you can power some of these through the usb alone. So it seems like I will either go the route of using a bridge or I resort to a 802.11g pcmcia card. I appreciate the info, and if you have anything else to add that will be greatly appreciated!

Reply 10 of 12, by Yushatak

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I know I'm bumping an old topic here, but the fact that I found it means that others might still find this of interest..

The referenced driver pack for the 6070 above called "Airlink101_AWL6070_20080125_.zip" doesn't have folders for anything but XP and Vista x86/x64, but the inf file for the x86 XP driver uses a "Chicago" signature and lists 98SE, ME, 2K, XP as targets in the comments at the top - it should work.

Wanted to hunt down an N card for 98SE and it seems that is the one to find.

Reply 11 of 12, by Jasin Natael

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I have gotten a few PCI/USB DLINK ones working with Windows 98 and WPA2, but you have to use the DLINK connection wizard. It works just fine but I was limited to Wireless G.
It is worth noting however that it killed performance on the system even when not in use. This was a K6-3+ machine. Didn't seem to hurt the PIII system I was testing it on nearly as much however.

I'm sorry but i can't remember the chipsets on the cards offhand.

Reply 12 of 12, by Yushatak

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I noticed performance impact from having DLink PCMCIA/CardBus 802.11g devices on my Toshiba Librettos (tiny top-of-the-line original Pentium boxes) as well, I imagine too much processing is happening on the machine-end rather than the card for weaker systems to be comfortable. There's not really any fixing that, though, other than to not use the card when you don't need it for something. Since the machine can't really *use* that much speed at that point it might make more sense to use a 802.11b connection, to be honest, but it's not exactly accessible these days, you kinda have to have that explicitly set up.

The reason I seek an 802.11n card is that that will be supported on networks and network hardware for quite a while longer and it just barely stretches the limits of what 9x supports (it's always fun to push limits even if it doesn't serve a real purpose, at least for me).

There are a number of 802.11g cards that work with 9x, there's a 3com one with a collapsible antenna that sits inside the slot when not in use (and it disables the card when pushed in, which is nice due to the taxing of the hardware to use it from earlier machines in that era) for instance, and lately I've been using D-Link DWL-G650 cards in my Librettos. There are of course PCI cards for desktop users.

If you're cool with 802.11b there's even more options, even for older machines in PCMCIA like the Cisco Aironet 350 as well as ISA<->PCMCIA which I've used with that card on a 486 desktop this way under DOS/WFW - quite a satisfying thing to make work.

One of the issues is even with drivers most of these things don't support modern encryption (still WPA2 somehow even though that's not very secure). Using the Odyssey client solves that if you can find a copy that works and get it configured properly, but the D-Link client works as well. It's all hit-or-miss depending on the software unless you use a third party one like Odyssey.