VOGONS


First post, by OSkar000

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I have an Dell XPS R450 that I have plans to upgrade with a faster CPU.

Is there any chance that it could work with a Slot 1 to Socket 370 adaptor with built in VRM and run a Tualain or Coppermine on it? It happily accepts a P3 500 (Katmai).

I know that I'm limited to 100mhz bus but I can live with that.

Reply 1 of 6, by Standard Def Steve

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In my Dell XPS T550, I run a Celeron 1400 on a Lin-Lin FC-PGA2 adapter sitting atop a passive (no VRM) Asus slocket.
I set the jumpers on the Lin-Lin to request 1.4v, and the jumpers on the Asus slocket to passthrough the voltage request. The Dell/Intel motherboard seems more than happy to provide the 1.4v necessary for Tualatin CPUs.

The R450 is slightly older, but since your adapter has a built in VRM, it should work just fine--at least with Coppermine CPUs. Tualatin support will depend on the range of your adapter's VRM (can it get down to 1.5v?), and whether or not it will take FC-PGA2 chips.

Standard Def Rigs
Super P3: PIII-S @ 1.63 GHz/FSB155 | 2GB DDR-310 | 6800GT AGP | 500GB 7200 RPM
Super G4: 2x PowerPC 7455 @ 1.5 GHz | 2GB DDR-333 | 7800GS AGP | 300GB 10k RPM
Super G5: 4x PowerPC 970 @ 2.5 GHz | 16GB DDR2-533 | x1950XT PCIe | 512GB SSD

Reply 2 of 6, by darry

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Standard Def Steve wrote on 2021-01-05, 16:45:

In my Dell XPS T550, I run a Celeron 1400 on a Lin-Lin FC-PGA2 adapter sitting atop a passive (no VRM) Asus slocket.
I set the jumpers on the Lin-Lin to request 1.4v, and the jumpers on the Asus slocket to passthrough the voltage request. The Dell/Intel motherboard seems more than happy to provide the 1.4v necessary for Tualatin CPUs.

The R450 is slightly older, but since your adapter has a built in VRM, it should work just fine--at least with Coppermine CPUs. Tualatin support will depend on the range of your adapter's VRM (can it get down to 1.5v?), and whether or not it will take FC-PGA2 chips.

AFAIK, the only socket 370 to slot 1 adapter with an onboard VRM is the Powerleap PL-IP3/T . Anything else, at most allows you to override the CPU's VID and request a given voltage from the motherboard's VRM circuit. AFAIK, If the motherboard does not recognize the CPU's VID (or whatever value set on slotket) value or cannot comply, the CPU can receive anything between the lowest voltage the VRM circuit can provide up the highest, or some kind of default value in between . The exact behavior will depend on the motherboard design.

Reply 3 of 6, by Paadam

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You can just set the voltage to 1.8 volts and any Coppermine will happily work with that.
People just do not bother to search enough, this topic has been beaten to death..

Many 3Dfx and Pentium III-S stuff.
My amibay FS thread: www.amibay.com/showthread.php?88030-Man ... -370-dual)

Reply 4 of 6, by OSkar000

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I'm acutally not sure if it has a VRM built in but it has jumpers for setting the voltage. I think its worth a try at least.

It seems to support as low as 1.3v so if the motherboard can handle it there shouldn't be a problem.

Ill check if I can find anything useful about the VRM on the motherboard before I try anything.

Reply 5 of 6, by darry

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Paadam wrote on 2021-01-05, 18:39:

You can just set the voltage to 1.8 volts and any Coppermine will happily work with that.
People just do not bother to search enough, this topic has been beaten to death..

I am not volunteering (yet), but this and other subjects might be great material for either a WIKI entry or a FAQ . There is a lot of great material on the forum, but finding it can be challenging for someone new to a given subject and who consequently does not already have a good sense of what he/she might need to look for . Just my two cents .

Reply 6 of 6, by chinny22

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You can also widen the search to include Intel SE440BX motherboards which may have a bit more info on the web

Thats right, Intel themselves were the manufactures of the motherboard with the evil ATX but not ATX connector in your PC. That and the onboard sound is about the only changes made from their own board