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Reply 20 of 24, by luckybob

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It was a late socket A thing. If memory serves. Pull the heatsink off a working P4 and equivalent amd, and the latter would usually save itself, where the p4 would start a fire.

Early socket A boards quite often had a thermistor inside the socket, but it really didn't make a big difference

It is a mistake to think you can solve any major problems just with potatoes.

Reply 22 of 24, by ultra_code

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Doornkaat wrote on 2021-07-04, 09:42:

Guess AMD was a bit behind in tech.

Because they didn't include a thermal sensor in their CPUs?

Yep. 😀

Okay, for real, though: was space that limited that they couldn't put a thermal sensor in-die?

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Reply 23 of 24, by bofh.fromhell

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the_ultra_code wrote on 2021-07-04, 12:34:
Doornkaat wrote on 2021-07-04, 09:42:

Guess AMD was a bit behind in tech.

Because they didn't include a thermal sensor in their CPUs?

Yep. 😀

Okay, for real, though: was space that limited that they couldn't put a thermal sensor in-die?

I guess someone has to be the first one to do it.
And this time it was Intel with the coppermine P3 (?).
Tho it was very rudimentary IIRC, it just halted the CPU when temperatures were deemed to high.

Reply 24 of 24, by Oetker

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luckybob wrote on 2021-07-04, 09:21:

Pull the heatsink off a working P4 and equivalent amd, and the latter would usually save itself, where the p4 would start a fire.

I think it was the other way round.