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First post, by gidierre

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(I had expected it to be worse than it turned out)

we had a discussion here :
does he ever say Klaatu barada nicto or not ?

Warning: spoilers

to me, he (Klaatu) kind of mutters something to that effect, after being hit
but it could have been any other words

come think of it, the situation he's in is not the same as in the 1951 original movie, so it shouldn't make much sense if he issues the very same command (?)
unless his and Gort's language is but an endless pitch variation around a couple of words, like R. Sheckley's "Shall We Have a Little Talk?"

We often forgive those who bore us, but we cannot forgive those whom we bore. (La Rochefoucauld)

Reply 1 of 10, by DosFreak

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Keanu Reeves movie.....so it's a rental.

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Reply 3 of 10, by gidierre

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now

finally found the answer here
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0970416/trivia

The line "Klaatu barada nikto" from The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951), was reused in this film at Keanu Reeves's insistence. The line was used in The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951) to revive a mortally-wounded Klaatu, while in this film it has been used in a reversed situation: to give Klaatu a human body to inhabit.

In the original, Klaatu instructs Helen to say the famous line "Klaatu Barada Nichto" to Gort in the event of his death. Klaatu never speaks this line directly to Gort.

Keanu Reeves recorded the line "Klaatu barada nikto" twice, and one recording was played backward and spliced with the other (which was left normal) to make the overall dialog sound more otherworldly.

EDIT

valnar wrote:

It was entertaining, but it completely missed the point of the original movie, and therefore really isn't a remake

that's right, it keeps the title, but the plot twists and not for the best.

Well, there was an improvement though: 😀
at Professor Barnhardt's aka J. Cleese of Monty Python fame Klaatu is being overwhelmed listening to what seems to be
one of the Goldberg variations (J.S. Bach!) reconciling him to our world.

There's an earthling I would have liked to see brought down by nanorobot (?) power, but it'd hardly be "politically correct" to say who it should be 😜

Last edited by gidierre on 2009-01-05, 01:58. Edited 3 times in total.

We often forgive those who bore us, but we cannot forgive those whom we bore. (La Rochefoucauld)

Reply 4 of 10, by dh4rm4

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I did and it was crap. As valnar said it completely missed the point of the original and turned it into a formulaic action movie with cameos of popular college TV stars.

valnar : There is no "I, Robot story." It's a book of short stories by Asimov. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I,_Robot#Contents

The director of I Robot wanted to convey the overarching content of the book with special attention the laws of robotics and how they'lll impact on society by writing his own 'detective' story that fitted with the theme. Unfortunately the studio turned his ideas into a marketing excercise and used overtly simple mechanics to do so.

gid : This is the closest I've seen to what the phrase was meant to mean and I'm watching the original right now. 😉

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Klaatu_barada_nikto

Reply 5 of 10, by gidierre

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dh4rm4 wrote:

gid : This is the closest I've seen to what the phrase was meant to mean and I'm watching the original right now. 😉
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Klaatu_barada_nikto

the original b/w 1951 movie by Robert Wise ? 😁 😁

Klaatu speaks out "the most famous phrase ever spoken by an extraterrestrial!" ROFL

Don't you think the 1951 scenes with Gort within the spaceship were absolutely exquisite and terrifying ?

I wasn't born yet in 1951, but sometimes I wonder how the relatively naive audiences of the Fifties might have sit through it 😳 😵

Btw have you read the 1941 short story (Farewell To The Master) behind the first movie (although it's a different plot), it seems it's not copyrighted anymore so it's freely readable online 😎

We often forgive those who bore us, but we cannot forgive those whom we bore. (La Rochefoucauld)

Reply 6 of 10, by dh4rm4

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Yes.

It's true, it's been misquoted and referred to in many other science fiction, fantasy other genre works.

Yes, especially consider the time in which they were released.

I wonder about that also. Cold War kids would've stayed but I'm sure there were many parents who walked out.

Not yet, but it is on my ever lengthening reading list.

Reply 7 of 10, by butterfly

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I enjoyed far better the 1951 movie and that doesn't surprise me cos it happened with several remakes (i.e.: Invasion of the Body-Snatchers from the 70's which was a remake itself). Older movies have a more "theatrical" (in the original meaning of the term) flavour and that keeps me more thrilled but that's a shame cos Hollywood could really do better considered the special effects and the money involved nowadays. Now I don't wanna criticize saying that movies today are only and exclusively marketing projects (compared to marketing and art of older ones) but it's all business baby!

Reply 8 of 10, by gidierre

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dh4rm4 wrote:

Not yet, but it is on my ever lengthening reading list.

should you need the link to it, it's here
http://thenostalgialeague.com/olmag/bates.html

it's really a short one, although I couldn't help looking up the dictionary quite a few times nonetheless 🙄
intriguing story, though, if anything to see how they elaborated on it to the whole "progressive" 1951 plot

butterfly wrote:

I enjoyed far better the 1951 movie and that doesn't surprise me cos it happened with several remakes (i.e.: Invasion of the Body-Snatchers from the 70's which was a remake itself)

btw did you know Body Snatchers has reached the 2 remake level 1957/1978/1994....

Afaict the more one is acquainted with the R. Wise movie the less is going to enjoy this 2008 remake and vice versa 😀

Anyone noticed the scientists' "abduction" by the military (new vs. 1951) seems, perhaps unwillingly, reminiscent of "The Andromeda Strain" (1971) inception, copycatted from Crichton's book, and that movie was directed by none other than.. R. Wise 20 years after The Earth Stood!

We often forgive those who bore us, but we cannot forgive those whom we bore. (La Rochefoucauld)

Reply 9 of 10, by dh4rm4

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Body Snatchers was also remade in 2007 as "The Invasion". - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Invasion_(film) It wasn't bad but it missed the point of the original story by making the aliens defeatable.

Reply 10 of 10, by gidierre

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dh4rm4 wrote:

Body Snatchers was also remade in 2007 as "The Invasion"

thx for the tip

--------------------

you know, it baffles me that among the host of movie connections/spoofs
that Scary Movie 4 is made of, no less than 33 of them identified!

just noone ever afaik noticed the spoofing of the Earth Stood Still, and not the 2008 one , because of the timing (2006) 🤣

that's after giant War of the World's iPod/TriPods attack,
when all electrical powers die on earth
(but if all potential difference is gone shouldn't also muscle, including heart muscle, tissue stop contracting ?)

now all electric charge is no more, cars, planes, pc's dead

(mechanics: )
- Turn it in again, see if it'll start.
- What's going on? The car's just not working.

(kid to his useless "stuck" skateboard 😁)
- Start !

(man undressed running from washroom: 🙄 )
- My bowels have stopped moving!

if that's no spoof of the Earth Stood Still, what is?

We often forgive those who bore us, but we cannot forgive those whom we bore. (La Rochefoucauld)