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Hackers, Hackers, Hackers !....

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First post, by Intel486dx33

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The USA in under attack by hackers from around the globe.
It has become worst in the last 10 years.

My home network has been attacked from operatives in europe and South America.

I have lost 2 NAS drives in my WD Mycloud’s.

Losts all my DOS programs and files i had saved from 1993.

My home network in now off-line.

I received Alerts from my. ISP as to hackers trying to access my network.

But no good. It’s all gone now.

Anyone else experiencing these problems ?

Reply 3 of 19, by darry

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Sad occurence . That is one of the reasons I still keep an offline copy of my most important data . USB hard drives are cheap .

NAS setups are great for convenience, but you are always a hack or a catastrophic PSU failure from disaster .

Another thing I do is to keep most of my NAS data read only through SAMBA . That way if some crypto ransomware gets through, my most important stuff is protected

Reply 5 of 19, by DracoNihil

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I hear all this about "hackers" yet I've yet to become a victim to this, what even is the catch?

Do people just, not use properly configured firewalls, arbitrarily block inbound connections from known bad actor IP ranges (even firewalling against entire regional ranges like Russia, Ukraine, China, Hong Kong, Korea, etc), and the most obvious don't have any program actively listening for outside connections 24/7?

Even when I used to primarily use Windows all those many years ago I never had someone remotely trash my PC or anything of that general nature.

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Reply 6 of 19, by cyclone3d

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Is this another troll post or just another person that didn't have proper backups?

And your ISP alerting you to hackers? First time I have ever heard of something like that. Are you sure you didn't go to a compromised web site that had one of those fake big red warning pop-ups about your computer being hacked?

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Reply 8 of 19, by brownk

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By the very moment you turn up & open up any port on a cloud instance, you'll be bombarded with all sorts of known attacks to mankind.

If someone could make a FPS game out of those harzadous activities, that would more brutal than Doom Eternal for sure.

Reply 11 of 19, by clueless1

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Very good hackers generally don't care about going after the average person. If you've done something to stand out to them, or pissed them off in some way, that could motivate them to focus their sights on you.

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Reply 12 of 19, by junglemontana

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I see incoming trash traffic all the time in the log of my router which is online 24/7. And so far nothing bad has happened. I think the traffic amounts have actually decreased since the worst IoT malware epidemics.

Hackers don't cause your hard disks to break. The correct method of protection against failing hardware - as well as ransomware and accidental deletion - is to take backups of all important files and keep them in a safe storage.

Reply 16 of 19, by Intel486dx33

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Errius wrote on 2020-04-15, 15:12:

Warm weather arrives = hard drives start failing. Same story every year.

Yes, My MyCloud NAS drives were old but it was the fact that my ISP has an app that alerts you of hackers try to sniff your ports or trying to gain access to you drives. Also My Mycloud NAS drives also this feature but they are not working now so I can access the log files.

Anyways, I think the platers are still good on my NAS hard drives. I think the PCB or Heads on the hard-drive are bad.

Could a hacker have caused these drives to fail ?
Some malicious code that could destroy NAS drives ?

Reply 17 of 19, by imi

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that's not hackers that is simply bots, and everyone that is connected to the internet will get port scans eventually, that's just life in the internet and the reason why you have a layer in between your home network and the outside world.

Reply 18 of 19, by Zup

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Intel486dx33 wrote on 2020-04-15, 15:21:

Could a hacker have caused these drives to fail ?
Some malicious code that could destroy NAS drives ?

I don't think that hackers did that, but I know at least two methods of killing hard disks: using SATA security features and using power save features.

Unsing the SATA features, you could try to set the HPA feature to cover (almost) the entire disk. The disk won't be physically damaged but would be unusable. Also, there are SATA commands to set passwords, lock disks and secure erase.

About power saving... well I know of some devices that their firmware (if not upgraded) slowly killed disks. They use an embedded Linux that made the disks go into power save mode as quick as possible. On the other hand, it wrote some data to their logs frequently (not so frequent that avoided the HDD sleeping, but enough to awake it quickly). So the HDD was constantly doing load-unload cycles, to the point that the disks failed after a time. I've seen some disks that SMART reported more than 1.8 million load-unload cycles... and the manufacturer webs stated that they guaranteed about 600k. Note that this behaviour won't kill your disks inmediatly, but you'll have a physical failure over time (it usually takes more than a year on that devices to kill a disk).

I guess that (if a hacker can write to the OS files) it could replicate the second method, or use the first one to make most people throw their disks away. In any case, if I were a hacker and wanted to kill your data, I'd use the typical dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sda command. It's easier and faster.

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