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Worst tips from tech support

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Reply 20 of 47, by Brickpad

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I work in tech. support. One of our "senior" techs. removed all the doors from the servers racks (again, "senior" tech.) because, paraphrasing here, "the servers will overheat and melt the solder." I'm pretty sure that by the time the solder reaches its melting point our data center will be an inferno. I simply cannot imagine the leaps in logic he took to come up with that. This is also the same guy who tells us we cannot name a computer the same as the username else the computer will get confused. This is also a guy who likes to brag that he has a Bachelor's degree (in an unrelated field) and an MCSE certification.

Yeah.

Reply 21 of 47, by cyclone3d

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Tell him that he can download more RAM. He will probably believe it.

Yamaha YMF modified setupds and drivers
Yamaha XG resource repository - updated November 27, 2018
Yamaha YMF7x4 Guide
AW744L II - YMF744 - AOpen Cobra Sound Card - Install SB-Link Header

Reply 22 of 47, by Brickpad

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cyclone3d wrote on 2021-06-07, 23:55:

Tell him that he can download more RAM. He will probably believe it.

This guy has some serious odd quirks. He's a real life Nick Burns too.

Reply 23 of 47, by chinny22

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386SX wrote on 2021-06-07, 16:00:

Anyway about tech helpdesk they should let customers decide which levels they can speak to because most times some people really would need a support from people that actually understand that customers already did most of the tests themself. Lately I bought a DVD home player (a cheap one) and obviously opened and tried there was not any remote control feedback between it and the IR receiver. I tried everything and once I bring it back to the store I told them all the tests I did and the only explanation was or a faulty remote control or a faulty IR receiver. They couldn't say anything as they saw that some people understand the basics of how things works and I bought another better one (even if most are cheap too even good brands ones).

Disagree,
I've found most people at least while something is covered by warranty, don't see it as their problem. I love when they call and say "your dvd player is broken"
um no, mine is fine but thanks for the concern. I'm happy to help you troubleshoot yours.
Mostly they just want a new one, well referb but again most people don't realise this, it's new to them and thats all that matters.
(I actually don't have a problem with this, if it's under warranty I see no problem minimising down time they get a replacement and we'll referb and send that unit out to the next person)

As for letting people choose their support level, problem with that is everyone would say it needs senior support.
I am a senior engineer and thank god only on the helpdesk once in a while but the amount of trivial jobs you get because this person thinks that not been able to print to their preferred printer is end of the world.
Doesn't matter that the person sitting 2 desks away computer doesn't turn on so unable to work at all.

What most company's are bad at is escalating to the next level.
1st line should always be first point of call, let them go thought their standard check list, have you done A, B, C
You have and it hasn't worked? ok let me escalate to the next level. It really should be that simple.

Reply 24 of 47, by BitWrangler

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https://xkcd.com/806/

tech_support.png

Unicorn herding operations are proceeding, but all the totes of hens teeth and barrels of rocking horse poop give them plenty of hiding spots.

Reply 25 of 47, by Jasin Natael

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I once had my ISP CenturyLink (DSL) completely change my PPPoE credentials without telling me. Of course this broke my internet. Then I was told there was a service outage in my area and it would be resolved within 24 hours. Come to find out there was no outage, they just changed my credentials and if I had not been for me asking them to verify them so that I could re-bridge my modem (after they made me reset the modem, twice) they wouldn't have ever figured out the problem.

There are other similar stories with multiple different ISPs/software vendors as I work in third party IT. But that is the most recent one I can think of that affected me personally.

Reply 26 of 47, by Mister Xiado

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Having worked for AT&T for a decade (do not imitate, extreme risk of self-termination), it killed me inside to hear customers' stories about stupid suggestions from support. I absolutely hated that by random chance, someone got to talk to me, and my insanely obscure experiences were the perfect solution to their problem. I once spoke with a doctor whose dog had unplugged the USB cable for her BlackBerry during a software update. She said she had thousands of important contacts and records on the phone, and was desperate to recover them, but had been told that she had to get a new phone. I walked her through verifying the presence of the AUTOMATED BACKUP FILE created prior to any updates, and then putting the phone in recovery mode. Restored the software, and then restored the backup. Also had her copy the backup onto a memory card and told her to keep it somewhere safe, like a deposit box, or at work. If she hadn't gotten to speak with me, I don't know what would have happened, but it probably wouldn't have been good. That kind of distress really grinds on you.

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Reply 27 of 47, by 386SX

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chinny22 wrote on 2021-06-08, 09:40:
Disagree, I've found most people at least while something is covered by warranty, don't see it as their problem. I love when the […]
Show full quote
386SX wrote on 2021-06-07, 16:00:

Anyway about tech helpdesk they should let customers decide which levels they can speak to because most times some people really would need a support from people that actually understand that customers already did most of the tests themself. Lately I bought a DVD home player (a cheap one) and obviously opened and tried there was not any remote control feedback between it and the IR receiver. I tried everything and once I bring it back to the store I told them all the tests I did and the only explanation was or a faulty remote control or a faulty IR receiver. They couldn't say anything as they saw that some people understand the basics of how things works and I bought another better one (even if most are cheap too even good brands ones).

Disagree,
I've found most people at least while something is covered by warranty, don't see it as their problem. I love when they call and say "your dvd player is broken"
um no, mine is fine but thanks for the concern. I'm happy to help you troubleshoot yours.
Mostly they just want a new one, well referb but again most people don't realise this, it's new to them and thats all that matters.
(I actually don't have a problem with this, if it's under warranty I see no problem minimising down time they get a replacement and we'll referb and send that unit out to the next person)

As for letting people choose their support level, problem with that is everyone would say it needs senior support.
I am a senior engineer and thank god only on the helpdesk once in a while but the amount of trivial jobs you get because this person thinks that not been able to print to their preferred printer is end of the world.
Doesn't matter that the person sitting 2 desks away computer doesn't turn on so unable to work at all.

What most company's are bad at is escalating to the next level.
1st line should always be first point of call, let them go thought their standard check list, have you done A, B, C
You have and it hasn't worked? ok let me escalate to the next level. It really should be that simple.

It's a good point. But I suppose that the different levels logic most of the times remains to the first level like the problem is often when not always the customer and I suppose and understand many times it might be probably but sometimes there're also customers that before calling for a tech support would try anything to just make the product work. I usually tend to hope it should be unlikely any brand new product might have such problems once unboxed but still many times happens that the product really has problems even if never used before.

Reply 28 of 47, by Hezus

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I bought Anno 1701 from GoG.com but it kept crashing on large scenario's. The tech support gave me the best suggestion ever: don't play the big scenario's.

I kid you not. Their fix to a broken game was not playing the game.

Visit my YT Channel!

Reply 29 of 47, by Miphee

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Hezus wrote on 2021-06-08, 20:12:

Their fix to a broken game was not playing the game.

We all know games with huge glitches that never got fixed. Some of those are game-breaking bugs.
If the developers didn't fix it then customer support has no chance in hell helping the buyer.
All this for a $50-70 game that you can't even return.

Reply 30 of 47, by shamino

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We had very unreliable cable internet with Suddenlink in rural California. For a few years though, when I called I'd be connected to some guy who knew what he was doing and would have an intelligent conversation with me to identify the problem. That was nice. Then it all changed and I started reaching the generic front line support that had no clue and was just trying to find a way to dismiss your call.
Then it all changed again and when our internet was out for 2 solid weeks, they didn't answer the phone at all. The bill still came though.

Speaking generically, whenever you run into a clueless front line rep, I'll encourage everybody to just be patient and polite until they get you to the next level. My sister used to work phone support for a retailer and there were days when she had to go to the restroom to cry. It can be a stressful job because they get a lot of people who think they can get better service by being irritable and nasty. Of course there's rare exceptions where the rep themselves wants to have a fight, but that's usually not the case.

I think the worst "support" experience I can think of wasn't with a computer company, it was with U-Haul. I have no idea how that company is still in business today. Back in the 90s and 2000s they were hopeless. They basically never had anything you reserved. They'd take 15 minutes to print a receipt for each customer, sometimes send last minute "updates" requiring you to drive to another town to get your trailer, or alternatively making you wait while *they* drove to another town to get your equipment, etc. It was as much fun dealing with U-Haul as the DMV. I think they're a little better in the last ~10 years but still pretty bad.

One of the worst experiences was with this dumb variation of their tow dolly that doesn't have proper ramps on it. Instead the back end of it just drops down and you have to drive up a very short, sharply angled ramp. No car can use this because the overhang from the front wheels to the front of the car just hits the ramp before the wheels have even reached it. Maybe a truck can use it, but not any realistic car.

We got screwed with one of these, having told them exactly what car we were towing at the time of the reservation, and there was just no way it could get up the ramp. Drive back to the facility, hours wasted. They had several of the proper style of dollies at the facility but they refused to let us swap it. So then it's time to get out the phone and call UHaul Central. Time to start arguing about why we can't use their cheapass dolly and need the properly designed model. They insist that if the car won't fit then it must have been "modified". No, it's stock, it's exactly the car we said it was for the reservation, and hardly any stock car made in the last 30+ years could ever use this thing. They flat out refused to resolve the problem, acting as if we had picked the dolly and not them.
About a year later the same exact issue came up again with a different car. That time the rental place was a smaller outfit (a UHaul affiliate/franchisee/whatever). He gave us a refund which was all he could do since he didn't have any other dollies. He was as annoyed with UHaul as we were. I like to think he probably complained and somebody at the company might actually listen when it's an affiliate making the complaint, instead of a lowly customer.

Few years later we made the mistake of reserving a truck from UHaul for a move. They gave us a shorter truck than we had reserved. We had to leave a lot of things behind because of that.
We dealt with Penske once. They seemed way better in that experience, better organized, and at the same time easy going and accommodating. When it came time for our move they were willing to price match against UHaul. It was a huge mistake that we didn't take them up on that because I bet they would have had the correct truck, probably sitting in the parking lot pointed out with the engine idling at the crack of dawn on moving day. Instead we had UHaul.

Reply 31 of 47, by BitWrangler

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shamino wrote on 2021-06-08, 23:47:

I think the worst "support" experience I can think of wasn't with a computer company, it was with U-Haul. I have no idea how that company is still in business today. Back in the 90s and 2000s they were hopeless. They basically never had anything you reserved. They'd take 15 minutes to print a receipt for each customer, sometimes send last minute "updates" requiring you to drive to another town to get your trailer, or alternatively making you wait while *they* drove to another town to get your equipment, etc. It was as much fun dealing with U-Haul as the DMV. I think they're a little better in the last ~10 years but still pretty bad.

Ah man yeah, I've had some huge problems with Uhaul. Reserve stuff and they don't have it, no shit I'm bringing the truck back late when the loading dolly didn't come with it as it was supposed to and everything had to be humped one box at a time by hand, instead of 4 or 5 per trip. All their stuff is broken too, they're like "Yeah, get it repaired on your dime while your rental clock is ticking and we'll eventually refund you the repair cost." Tried them at one of those "neighbourhood" dealers, was total farce.. but they were cheap, so next time went to the larger regional one, still a freaking nightmare.

Unicorn herding operations are proceeding, but all the totes of hens teeth and barrels of rocking horse poop give them plenty of hiding spots.

Reply 32 of 47, by cyclone3d

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I've never really had an issue with U-haul other then me needing to rent a truck in the middle of nowhere because I had a vehicle break down.

They had the trailer but the only truck they had in that town was on of the largest when all I needed was a small 1-ton.

Back in the day they even let me rent a trailer and hook it up to a Plymouth Reliant K-car. Technically the trailer was way too big for the car to haul but I did it anyway. Went from Arizona to Florida. Going up long hills and The car couldn't keep above about 40mph.

Yamaha YMF modified setupds and drivers
Yamaha XG resource repository - updated November 27, 2018
Yamaha YMF7x4 Guide
AW744L II - YMF744 - AOpen Cobra Sound Card - Install SB-Link Header

Reply 33 of 47, by Hezus

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Miphee wrote on 2021-06-08, 22:04:
We all know games with huge glitches that never got fixed. Some of those are game-breaking bugs. If the developers didn't fix it […]
Show full quote
Hezus wrote on 2021-06-08, 20:12:

Their fix to a broken game was not playing the game.

We all know games with huge glitches that never got fixed. Some of those are game-breaking bugs.
If the developers didn't fix it then customer support has no chance in hell helping the buyer.
All this for a $50-70 game that you can't even return.

Luckily this was only a few EUR on GoG so it wasn't a total waste.

Also, I didn't blame the tech support guy for the bug itself. They don't develop the games and most of them are really old. If he'd offered me my money back because it was something they couldn't fix, then I would have been fine with it. It was just the "well.. just don't play it-solution" that flabbergasted me.

Visit my YT Channel!

Reply 34 of 47, by chinny22

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386SX wrote on 2021-06-08, 17:43:
chinny22 wrote on 2021-06-08, 09:40:
Disagree, I've found most people at least while something is covered by warranty, don't see it as their problem. I love when the […]
Show full quote
386SX wrote on 2021-06-07, 16:00:

Anyway about tech helpdesk they should let customers decide which levels they can speak to because most times some people really would need a support from people that actually understand that customers already did most of the tests themself. Lately I bought a DVD home player (a cheap one) and obviously opened and tried there was not any remote control feedback between it and the IR receiver. I tried everything and once I bring it back to the store I told them all the tests I did and the only explanation was or a faulty remote control or a faulty IR receiver. They couldn't say anything as they saw that some people understand the basics of how things works and I bought another better one (even if most are cheap too even good brands ones).

Disagree,
I've found most people at least while something is covered by warranty, don't see it as their problem. I love when they call and say "your dvd player is broken"
um no, mine is fine but thanks for the concern. I'm happy to help you troubleshoot yours.
Mostly they just want a new one, well referb but again most people don't realise this, it's new to them and thats all that matters.
(I actually don't have a problem with this, if it's under warranty I see no problem minimising down time they get a replacement and we'll referb and send that unit out to the next person)

As for letting people choose their support level, problem with that is everyone would say it needs senior support.
I am a senior engineer and thank god only on the helpdesk once in a while but the amount of trivial jobs you get because this person thinks that not been able to print to their preferred printer is end of the world.
Doesn't matter that the person sitting 2 desks away computer doesn't turn on so unable to work at all.

What most company's are bad at is escalating to the next level.
1st line should always be first point of call, let them go thought their standard check list, have you done A, B, C
You have and it hasn't worked? ok let me escalate to the next level. It really should be that simple.

It's a good point. But I suppose that the different levels logic most of the times remains to the first level like the problem is often when not always the customer and I suppose and understand many times it might be probably but sometimes there're also customers that before calling for a tech support would try anything to just make the product work. I usually tend to hope it should be unlikely any brand new product might have such problems once unboxed but still many times happens that the product really has problems even if never used before.

Agree this time! 😀
I guess its the same in just about all industries (I don't think its any secret that retail is really bad) but you can break customers down to 3 groups.
Helpful and Knowledgeable, The people who have done as much of the ground work tat they can do to speed up the process to achieve the end result.
Helpful but not Knowledgeable, The people that have come to you for your expertise as they know the task is beyond their skillset.
Unhelpful, maybe knowledgeable, maybe not. but they have already made their minds up on what should be done beforehand and insist on telling you on how to proceed.

On the other side of the coin though I think companies haven't helped the relationship.
IT specifically screwed itself in the 2000's? when companies saw moving helpdesks to places like India a good way to cut costs. Not necessarily a bad thing if done properly but you can tell often they are been asked to support products they have no idea about, if its not in the script then they are just as clueless as you causing customers to expect to have to fight for a decent level of service.

shamino wrote on 2021-06-08, 23:47:

Speaking generically, whenever you run into a clueless front line rep, I'll encourage everybody to just be patient and polite until they get you to the next level. My sister used to work phone support for a retailer and there were days when she had to go to the restroom to cry. It can be a stressful job because they get a lot of people who think they can get better service by being irritable and nasty. Of course there's rare exceptions where the rep themselves wants to have a fight, but that's usually not the case.

Very much this!
A small amount has to be tolerated as the rep needs to understand the user is simply frustrated but as the customer you need to show the same respect as you would expect from your customers.
Yes first line is usually the kids just out of Uni, but everyone has to start somewhere. Just as you (hopefully) don't yell at the person with the trainee badge behind the bar for taking too long to make your coffee .
run thought their script get it out the way, usually it wont take more then 15 minutes then everyone can move onto the next level.

That's how I've worked for 20+ years working in IT not to mention my personal life, that's a lot of tech support tickets raised and don't have any real horror stories. A few that have taken maybe double the time it should have to been resolved but resolved all the same.

Reply 35 of 47, by eisapc

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Brickpad wrote on 2021-06-07, 19:56:

... This is also a guy who likes to brag that he has a Bachelor's degree (in an unrelated field) and an MCSE certification.

Ah, a Minesweeper Consultant and Solitaire Expert.

Reply 36 of 47, by chrismeyer6

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eisapc wrote on 2021-06-09, 11:43:
Brickpad wrote on 2021-06-07, 19:56:

... This is also a guy who likes to brag that he has a Bachelor's degree (in an unrelated field) and an MCSE certification.

Ah, a Minesweeper Consultant and Solitaire Expert.

That's awesome and I might have to use that

Reply 37 of 47, by 386SX

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chinny22 wrote on 2021-06-09, 09:13:
Agree this time! :) I guess its the same in just about all industries (I don't think its any secret that retail is really bad) b […]
Show full quote
386SX wrote on 2021-06-08, 17:43:
chinny22 wrote on 2021-06-08, 09:40:
Disagree, I've found most people at least while something is covered by warranty, don't see it as their problem. I love when the […]
Show full quote

Disagree,
I've found most people at least while something is covered by warranty, don't see it as their problem. I love when they call and say "your dvd player is broken"
um no, mine is fine but thanks for the concern. I'm happy to help you troubleshoot yours.
Mostly they just want a new one, well referb but again most people don't realise this, it's new to them and thats all that matters.
(I actually don't have a problem with this, if it's under warranty I see no problem minimising down time they get a replacement and we'll referb and send that unit out to the next person)

As for letting people choose their support level, problem with that is everyone would say it needs senior support.
I am a senior engineer and thank god only on the helpdesk once in a while but the amount of trivial jobs you get because this person thinks that not been able to print to their preferred printer is end of the world.
Doesn't matter that the person sitting 2 desks away computer doesn't turn on so unable to work at all.

What most company's are bad at is escalating to the next level.
1st line should always be first point of call, let them go thought their standard check list, have you done A, B, C
You have and it hasn't worked? ok let me escalate to the next level. It really should be that simple.

It's a good point. But I suppose that the different levels logic most of the times remains to the first level like the problem is often when not always the customer and I suppose and understand many times it might be probably but sometimes there're also customers that before calling for a tech support would try anything to just make the product work. I usually tend to hope it should be unlikely any brand new product might have such problems once unboxed but still many times happens that the product really has problems even if never used before.

Agree this time! 😀
I guess its the same in just about all industries (I don't think its any secret that retail is really bad) but you can break customers down to 3 groups.
Helpful and Knowledgeable, The people who have done as much of the ground work tat they can do to speed up the process to achieve the end result.
Helpful but not Knowledgeable, The people that have come to you for your expertise as they know the task is beyond their skillset.
Unhelpful, maybe knowledgeable, maybe not. but they have already made their minds up on what should be done beforehand and insist on telling you on how to proceed.

On the other side of the coin though I think companies haven't helped the relationship.
IT specifically screwed itself in the 2000's? when companies saw moving helpdesks to places like India a good way to cut costs. Not necessarily a bad thing if done properly but you can tell often they are been asked to support products they have no idea about, if its not in the script then they are just as clueless as you causing customers to expect to have to fight for a decent level of service.

shamino wrote on 2021-06-08, 23:47:

Speaking generically, whenever you run into a clueless front line rep, I'll encourage everybody to just be patient and polite until they get you to the next level. My sister used to work phone support for a retailer and there were days when she had to go to the restroom to cry. It can be a stressful job because they get a lot of people who think they can get better service by being irritable and nasty. Of course there's rare exceptions where the rep themselves wants to have a fight, but that's usually not the case.

Very much this!
A small amount has to be tolerated as the rep needs to understand the user is simply frustrated but as the customer you need to show the same respect as you would expect from your customers.
Yes first line is usually the kids just out of Uni, but everyone has to start somewhere. Just as you (hopefully) don't yell at the person with the trainee badge behind the bar for taking too long to make your coffee .
run thought their script get it out the way, usually it wont take more then 15 minutes then everyone can move onto the next level.

That's how I've worked for 20+ years working in IT not to mention my personal life, that's a lot of tech support tickets raised and don't have any real horror stories. A few that have taken maybe double the time it should have to been resolved but resolved all the same.

I understand the stressing part of these jobs and I suppose often the customers lost of patience is related to those automated logics that happens like people feeling those "check lists" are somehow a lost of time for them and maybe this has some truth from the customer point of view. I mean that not everything should always be categorized into a check lists basis like an automated voice phone support and sometimes it feels everything's like that even if obviously the support people has not any faults, it's just the way work is designed nowdays.
I sometime think the nowdays way of working for both customers and employees is too much "abstract" and there's not much freedom to use our own experience or intuition into our jobs.
For example I always didn't like the opening/closing "Tickets" software logic where everything seems like a cold managed system without any human priority management and everything seems to be counted, timed, costs, whatever.. I remember once I worked into sw testing I had my own way of doing platform tests that even if very obsolete with papers, pen, mails, directly speaking with sw developers it "just worked" fine. Instead when a new superior came that didn't even know what we were working on, it wanted to redesign all the ways we usually worked with who knows futuristic "test department" ideas where it wasn't really needed at all.
Maybe sometimes older ways of working even with pen and papers, without loosing time with useless work meetings at late evenings or things like that, are just enough and more human than any delivered Tickets from a cold software.

Reply 38 of 47, by Shagittarius

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386SX wrote on 2021-06-09, 16:22:
I understand the stressing part of these jobs and I suppose often the customers lost of patience is related to those automated l […]
Show full quote
chinny22 wrote on 2021-06-09, 09:13:
Agree this time! :) I guess its the same in just about all industries (I don't think its any secret that retail is really bad) b […]
Show full quote
386SX wrote on 2021-06-08, 17:43:

It's a good point. But I suppose that the different levels logic most of the times remains to the first level like the problem is often when not always the customer and I suppose and understand many times it might be probably but sometimes there're also customers that before calling for a tech support would try anything to just make the product work. I usually tend to hope it should be unlikely any brand new product might have such problems once unboxed but still many times happens that the product really has problems even if never used before.

Agree this time! 😀
I guess its the same in just about all industries (I don't think its any secret that retail is really bad) but you can break customers down to 3 groups.
Helpful and Knowledgeable, The people who have done as much of the ground work tat they can do to speed up the process to achieve the end result.
Helpful but not Knowledgeable, The people that have come to you for your expertise as they know the task is beyond their skillset.
Unhelpful, maybe knowledgeable, maybe not. but they have already made their minds up on what should be done beforehand and insist on telling you on how to proceed.

On the other side of the coin though I think companies haven't helped the relationship.
IT specifically screwed itself in the 2000's? when companies saw moving helpdesks to places like India a good way to cut costs. Not necessarily a bad thing if done properly but you can tell often they are been asked to support products they have no idea about, if its not in the script then they are just as clueless as you causing customers to expect to have to fight for a decent level of service.

shamino wrote on 2021-06-08, 23:47:

Speaking generically, whenever you run into a clueless front line rep, I'll encourage everybody to just be patient and polite until they get you to the next level. My sister used to work phone support for a retailer and there were days when she had to go to the restroom to cry. It can be a stressful job because they get a lot of people who think they can get better service by being irritable and nasty. Of course there's rare exceptions where the rep themselves wants to have a fight, but that's usually not the case.

Very much this!
A small amount has to be tolerated as the rep needs to understand the user is simply frustrated but as the customer you need to show the same respect as you would expect from your customers.
Yes first line is usually the kids just out of Uni, but everyone has to start somewhere. Just as you (hopefully) don't yell at the person with the trainee badge behind the bar for taking too long to make your coffee .
run thought their script get it out the way, usually it wont take more then 15 minutes then everyone can move onto the next level.

That's how I've worked for 20+ years working in IT not to mention my personal life, that's a lot of tech support tickets raised and don't have any real horror stories. A few that have taken maybe double the time it should have to been resolved but resolved all the same.

I understand the stressing part of these jobs and I suppose often the customers lost of patience is related to those automated logics that happens like people feeling those "check lists" are somehow a lost of time for them and maybe this has some truth from the customer point of view. I mean that not everything should always be categorized into a check lists basis like an automated voice phone support and sometimes it feels everything's like that even if obviously the support people has not any faults, it's just the way work is designed nowdays.
I sometime think the nowdays way of working for both customers and employees is too much "abstract" and there's not much freedom to use our own experience or intuition into our jobs.
For example I always didn't like the opening/closing "Tickets" software logic where everything seems like a cold managed system without any human priority management and everything seems to be counted, timed, costs, whatever.. I remember once I worked into sw testing I had my own way of doing platform tests that even if very obsolete with papers, pen, mails, directly speaking with sw developers it "just worked" fine. Instead when a new superior came that didn't even know what we were working on, it wanted to redesign all the ways we usually worked with who knows futuristic "test department" ideas where it wasn't really needed at all.
Maybe sometimes older ways of working even with pen and papers, without loosing time with useless work meetings at late evenings or things like that, are just enough and more human than any delivered Tickets from a cold software.

Many companies efforts to become "Agile" are really just an excuse to wrestle development control away from devs and into the hands of Sales and Marketing. Often times this results in the opposite intent of agile, which was simply created to remove barriers and time syncs from individuals and teams attempting to get their jobs done most efficiently. But in the business world managers grab on to what they think will help them do what they want with a process or product and the actual intent of a dev process gets lost, as it has with the idea of "Agile".

Usually what Sales and Marketing wants to do is take customer requests and implement them ASAP thinking mistakenly that customers actually know what they want. They don't, what you need is designers and dev team who can read between the customer request lines and figure out the actual product to create. Companies that go the route of catering directly to customers will not last.

Reply 39 of 47, by 386SX

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Shagittarius wrote on 2021-06-09, 16:25:

Many companies efforts to become "Agile" are really just an excuse to wrestle development control away from devs and into the hands of Sales and Marketing. Often times this results in the opposite intent of agile, which was simply created to remove barriers and time syncs from individuals and teams attempting to get their jobs done most efficiently. But in the business world managers grab on to what they think will help them do what they want with a process or product and the actual intent of a dev process gets lost, as it has with the idea of "Agile".

Also not to mention the atmosphere that is created in the work places where everything became a sort of smiling sharks swimming pool like I never remember it was (that much) in the early 2000's and I suppose even before.
The concept of armony in the work place between not only basic employees but between superiors and them imho has showed their failures in some of my work experiences. When superiors are not even happy themself cause the big career they did/wanted/got and it should have been obvious at first about the downsides, that shouldn't let the work place to become a sort of everyone vs everyone career battle. I've seen people eating everydays in front of the screen of their computer not because they weren't allow to go outside eating or whatever, but because the amount of work to solve became simply impossible to solve with the absurd nerves breaking logic of "If you can solve two problems, there's always the space for another one to solve and so on until you can't even remember how many problems are opened" or other times because that was their way to show superiors they really cared about their work while I often supposed it didn't make any differences.

Last edited by 386SX on 2021-06-09, 17:45. Edited 1 time in total.