VOGONS


First post, by GabrielKnight123

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Hi all, I have 10 PCI video cards that I would like to know the specifications for to find out the Vram size and clock can someone tell me a good dos program that is free that can do this.

Reply 1 of 10, by cyclone3d

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Slap them in a newer computer and use GPU-Z.

I don't think there is a DOS program that will tell you specs like that.

You can always look up the brand/model number of the video card.

If you are unsure about the amount of RAM, you can always look up the specs of the RAM chips.

Yamaha YMF modified setupds and drivers
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AW744L II - YMF744 - AOpen Cobra Sound Card - Install SB-Link Header

Reply 2 of 10, by F2bnp

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GPU-Z won't help here, as it only really recognizes Nvidia, AMD/ATi and Intel GPUs. Instead, I'd try HWInfo for DOS which should tell you all you need. Alternatively, you can look the cards up by checking stickers on the backside or perhaps PCB markings on the front side.

Reply 3 of 10, by dionb

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If these are PCI adapters from the VRAM (as opposed to DRAM, SGRAM or SDRAM) era, don't bank on getting relevant info from any software tool. At best a tool can tell you what everything is running at currently, but not what the specifications are. Just read the chips, that's the only way to really know. If you can't figure out what the numbers are trying to say, post them here and we should be able to help.

Reply 4 of 10, by shamino

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There's a tool called "Video Memory Stress Test" which has both DOS and Windows versions. It can detect the memory size and maybe the GPU type (not sure about that). I've only tried it (the DOS version) with a few versions of S3 Trio64V+ and Virge but it's at least worked with those so far. One of those was an 8MB Virge VX card, which it saw and tested the full RAM size of (not just 4MB as I assumed it would be limited to).

Reply 5 of 10, by Ozzuneoj

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I found an old version of Everest that works perfectly for this. It detects some pretty obscure stuff with high accuracy, even without drivers installed.

Now for some blitting from the back buffer.

Reply 6 of 10, by cyclone3d

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Ozzuneoj wrote:

I found an old version of Everest that works perfectly for this. It detects some pretty obscure stuff with high accuracy, even without drivers installed.

Sweet! What is the exact version?

Yamaha YMF modified setupds and drivers
Yamaha XG resource repository - updated November 27, 2018
Yamaha YMF7x4 Guide
AW744L II - YMF744 - AOpen Cobra Sound Card - Install SB-Link Header

Reply 7 of 10, by Falcosoft

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The predecessor of AIDA64/Everest was originally written for DOS. It has a pretty rich database about DOS/Win9x era hardware.
AIDA(16) :

Filename
thor_aida16en.zip
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508.54 KiB
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Fair use/fair dealing exception

Edit:
I have just noticed that newer versions of AIDA(16) has missing testing/benchmark functionality. Here's an older version that still has it.

Filename
AIDA_10.zip
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825.45 KiB
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52 downloads
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Reply 8 of 10, by Ozzuneoj

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cyclone3d wrote:
Ozzuneoj wrote:

I found an old version of Everest that works perfectly for this. It detects some pretty obscure stuff with high accuracy, even without drivers installed.

Sweet! What is the exact version?

Sorry, I forgot about this! I just checked and the version I use is Everest Home 2.01. I've used it on XP and 98SE and its fantastic. I'm not sure exactly how it gets the information but I used it to check the core and memory clocks, ROP\TMU organization and memory type (SDR\DDR) on tons of old ATi Rage, Nvidia TNT2 and Geforce 2 MX cards. It was extremely helpful, and as mentioned, it didn't require any drivers to be installed for the cards.

It was pretty amazing to finally figure out which cards were better than others. A fancy looking generic Geforce 2 "MX 400" with a gold heatsink that I'd used from time to time turned out to have the same specs as an MX200, despite having faster SDRAM chips. 64bit, not DDR and underclocked? Yeesh... thank you Everest for helping me to realize this before I used it in a system that actually needed the 3D performance of at least an MX400.

Now for some blitting from the back buffer.

Reply 10 of 10, by GabrielKnight123

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Thanks for all the suggestions I tried Aida and it works ok-ish just dont try the summary because it hangs my system and Everest worked the best but some of my cards were reported wrongly so im now looking into trying a good bench mark tool to use in Dos I dont know and I dont have any experience with them but can someone point me in the right direction to run tests to see which of the cards I have is the fastest?