VOGONS


First post, by JustJulião

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Hi,

It's my first post here.
I'm an engineer from Portugal. I'm working for a company which has a HUGE forgotten stock of old hardware. I use some of my free time to make it alive again and play on it.

A while ago, I came accross a PowerVR PCX2.
I know this card is rare and exciting for technical reasons, but this one is even rarer because it appears to be a Videologic model, not the "common" Matrox one.

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Problem is, this little girl has been poorly stored in a box with many bulk VGA cards and is now damaged :

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I tested it, in an "all or nothing" move. Surprisingly, it's """working""". Textures appear to be replaced with rainbows but geometry seemed surprisingly correct.
Of course, the simple fact it shows something positively surprised me but what if it could be any better ?

First, since I never used a PowerVR 1 card before, and saw it was sometimes tricky to make it work, maybe I can test it on a more compatible system.
I tested it on a DFI K6BV3+ (Via MVP3 chipset) with latest bios flashed.
The 2D card is a late 6326 (Diamond Speedster).
Does this system have any reason to show bad results with a PowerVR card ?
Should I test it on another one ?
Should I test it with other drivers ? I tested Videologic's last ones.
I think I might refrain trying too hard considering its condition though.

Second, how to repair it ? Do you think it could be repaired with some professional care ? I have basic soldering skills but I never soldered something this complex and I don't have the appropriate iron anyways.

Thanks !

Last edited by JustJulião on 2021-10-01, 13:54. Edited 2 times in total.

Reply 1 of 5, by BitWrangler

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What I would do is cut a piece of thin plastic off a drink bottle or something, about 2cm square, convenient to hold, and work it between the pins that are squished together until they all have a noticable space. Then take any pencil type soldering iron and touch all the "feet" of the pins on that row in case they are making bad contact. Then see where that gets you. System in question should be reasonable for testing, might not show peak performance, but should work.

Unicorn herding operations are proceeding, but all the totes of hens teeth and barrels of rocking horse poop give them plenty of hiding spots.

Reply 3 of 5, by cyclone3d

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I use an x-acto blade to straighten out bent legs like that. As long as you make sure they aren't touching each other and have a good solder connection to the board you should be good.

Just have to be very careful so you don't damage them or the board.

A lamp with magnifying glass is a great help when working on stuff like that.

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Reply 4 of 5, by kikipcs

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I'd check for lifted pins on that chip. They might not seem like they would be lifted, but they could. You could try sliding in a thin piece of paper under the legs to check that.

Otherwise as users above - straighten out the pins while exercising extra care.

And don't be worried about your soldering skills - if need be you could go to any laptop/phone repair shops (they have reflow machines) and ask for a reflow of the chip. Just don't tell them it's a rare card 😉