VOGONS


First post, by boggsman

User metadata
Rank Newbie
Rank
Newbie

Hi, I am looking to buy a PCI graphics card. I found this card: 109-74400-10. To me this looks like a Rage 128 VE 64-bit card. But on the sticker it says R128P. It only has two memory chips. Is there any possible way this card is a Rage 128 Pro with 128-bit memory? Thanks

Attachments

  • s-l1600a.jpg
    Filename
    s-l1600a.jpg
    File size
    514.09 KiB
    Views
    526 views
    File license
    Public domain
  • s-l1600.jpg
    Filename
    s-l1600.jpg
    File size
    519.9 KiB
    Views
    526 views
    File license
    Public domain

Reply 2 of 6, by Trashbytes

User metadata
Rank Oldbie
Rank
Oldbie
Putas wrote on 2024-01-30, 05:58:

It is a 64-bit card. Probably Pro, the stickers hardly ever lie. Amazing card, it seems it uses two ICs to make it work on PCI.

hardly .. mhm I have a Radeon 7000 that is actually a 7500 just with the 7000 sticker on it.

Certainly surprised me when both drivers and HWinfo picked it up as a 7500.

Reply 4 of 6, by Thermalwrong

User metadata
Rank Oldbie
Rank
Oldbie

There's some great pictures of the card close up here: https://www.ebay.com/itm/404405378718

109card.jpg
Filename
109card.jpg
File size
206.01 KiB
Views
413 views
File license
CC-BY-4.0

Most memory chips from the mainline DRAM manufacturers have pretty sensible naming. By that I mean, the re-mark bargain bin chips can have nonsense part codes, but Micron, Samsung etc put the bit-width in the part code so you should see the number 16 or 32 in a DRAM part code.
In this picture we can see that the part code has 2x DRAM chips with a '32' in the part name so 64-bits in total. That was pretty common in the SDRAM era of video cards so it's equivalent to maybe a TNT2-M64.

Later video cards seemed to settle on 16-bit wide SGRAM / DDR SGRAM in the TSOP (2 sides with legs) package, with 32-bit wide chips for the QFP (4 sides with legs) packages and BGA (no legs). I've found that if the part code of one DRAM chip on the card can be seen, you can add up how many are on the card with the number of bits to determine whether it's a 64-bit or 128-bit card - I just made the mistake of buying a Geforce 5700 with 4x '16' DRAM chips so that's a 64-bit card, because I couldn't see the DRAM part code and assumed those were 32-bit per chip...
128-bit cards would have at least 4x BGA / PQFP chips or 8x '16' TSOP chips.

If this PCI Rage card had 4x '32' SDRAM chips then it would be 128-bit.

Reply 5 of 6, by progman.exe

User metadata
Rank Member
Rank
Member
Trashbytes wrote on 2024-01-30, 06:12:

hardly .. mhm I have a Radeon 7000 that is actually a 7500 just with the 7000 sticker on it.

Certainly surprised me when both drivers and HWinfo picked it up as a 7500.

Markets get segmented to maximise income, and combined with economy of scale for a manufacturer, it might be more profitable overall (for one company, for a while, at least) to make one card but sell it with different labels. Some end customers pay full whack, some people get a free "upgrade".

And the lower-end cards sometimes being oddly fast can help with the reputation of the products.

Or it goes the other way, and because of problems at the card maker they cannot make enough 7000s, so mark up some 7500s as 7000s and just take a short-term loss rather than risk losing commercial buyers.

Or it is a labeling/packaging mistake, and if the company noticed it could have been cheaper to just let the cards go rather than re-do labels and packaging. Companies have machines to apply labels and box-up, but the other way would be manual. Just sell the cards! 😀

Reply 6 of 6, by Minutemanqvs

User metadata
Rank Member
Rank
Member

Just one note about the Rage 128 PCI, there are lots of them that were used in Apple computers with a BIOS incompatible with a x86 PC. Just be aware of that and do your research.

Searching a Nexgen Nx586 with FPU, PM me if you have one. I have some Athlon MP systems and cookies.