VOGONS


First post, by pico1180

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So, there I was, going to jump the power header when my metal tool slipped off the power header and touched the adjoining headers. I'm not sure if it made contact with one of the speaker header pins, or one of the key lock pins. All I know is, sparks flew and the system shut down.

On restart the board comes to life, spins fans, makes CPU's hot; all the good things you would expect. But it wont POST.

Of all the things that can kill a board, tell me this isn't one of them. I had big plans for this baby. Tell me she can be revived.

Reply 5 of 15, by luckybob

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"Not sure what i should be focusing in on."

well, the idea would be to locate a skidmark. Nothing obvious, so rasz_pl's reply is the likely outcome.

It is a mistake to think you can solve any major problems just with potatoes.

Reply 6 of 15, by rick6

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Try to measure the pins that shouldn't be grounded to ground. For example if the HDD led positive side is grounded (which shouldn't be obviously), follow it to the next component and make sure if that it isn't bad.
Most likely they all go straight to the chipset, which at that point i would consider it a lost cause.

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Reply 7 of 15, by meljor

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Few years ago I had the EXACT same thing, also with a p3b-f. Killed instantly. I felt pretty stupid for beeing so lazy and not using a proper button (or something with similar function).

After that I always grabbed a simple connector with 2 wires to start motherboards. Now, a few years later I find myself using the screwdriver again..... until the next stupid mistake comes along...

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Reply 8 of 15, by colpoz

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🤣!

I'm the third one who did this same stupid thing on my P3B-F!
I remember that after touching the two wrong pins, a small chip on the board flashed and gone away with a nice column of smoke... 😀

But the board didn't die!

it continued to work perfectly, with the only drawback that the only way to switch off the system was to remove the power cable! Turn off from Windows or from holding the power button did't work anymore!

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Reply 11 of 15, by Cyrix200+

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It looks to me there is some burn damage on the upper left pin (PWR)? You should check the backside of the board also (or do you have a picture?). Best case scenario there is a simple short somewhere.

Do you have a POST analysis card?

Reply 13 of 15, by rasz_pl

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colpoz wrote:
LOL! […]
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🤣!

I'm the third one who did this same stupid thing on my P3B-F!
I remember that after touching the two wrong pins, a small chip on the board flashed and gone away with a nice column of smoke... 😀

But the board didn't die!

it continued to work perfectly, with the only drawback that the only way to switch off the system was to remove the power cable! Turn off from Windows or from holding the power button did't work anymore!

now that changes things considerably, maybe there is something between pins and chipset (transistor/TTL gates)

Reply 14 of 15, by varrol

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rasz_pl wrote:
colpoz wrote:
LOL! […]
Show full quote

🤣!

I'm the third one who did this same stupid thing on my P3B-F!
I remember that after touching the two wrong pins, a small chip on the board flashed and gone away with a nice column of smoke... 😀

But the board didn't die!

it continued to work perfectly, with the only drawback that the only way to switch off the system was to remove the power cable! Turn off from Windows or from holding the power button did't work anymore!

now that changes things considerably, maybe there is something between pins and chipset (transistor/TTL gates)

I had that behaviour on this mobo when running damaged RAM + sometimes it was doing a reset on power button press. Of course those are old dusty stuff and there might have been another reason besides bad memory (cause I cleaned up it carefully before finding out about the memory).

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Reply 15 of 15, by HanJammer

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If it's a matter of 'zapped chipset' then the easy solution is to replace the chipset. Not as hard or expensive as you may think, and there's plenty of cheap/broken BX motherboards you can use as donors.

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