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First post, by derSammler

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So here's a short overview of the no-name notebook that I've restored in the last few days. It's apparently a MiTAC 4022 which was imported and sold in Germany under the "Lintec" brand (or "Fintec"? - hard to say because of the font they used).

Specs:
* CPU: UMC Green CPU U5SX, 33 MHz (installed by me, had an Intel DX2/66 originally, which ran way too hot)
* RAM: 4 MB (upgradable to 8 or 20 MB using proprietary RAM modules)
* Graphics: Chips & Technologies 65525 series, 512 KB, VLB
* 9.5" color dual-scan passive screen
* 1.44 MB slim-line floppy drive
* integrated track ball (not working, unfortunately)
* 2.5" internal IDE, attached a CF-card adapter to it (of course 😉 )
* a single PCMCIA 2.0 slot on the front with native BIOS support (no drivers required to access storage cards from DOS! It can even boot from them)
* docking port, VGA, 1x parallel, 1x serial, 1x PS/2 combo port for mouse/keyboard

This thing is quite odd in some ways. The lowest-spec version with an SX25 and monochrome display was sold for $999, so this was a budget notebook. However, it has features you would not expect from a budget notebook. E.g. there's a theft-protection tab on the back that can be pulled out and is fully made of very strong metal (like the inner part it is connected to). The whole construction is also very sturdy. The BIOS however is where things get really interesting. It has integrated user management. You can create up to three users and give them permission. You can create a user that can only read from floppy or hard disk, but not write to it (how cool is that?). There's also a "Server mode", though I have no idea what that is supposed to do...

Too bad it has no sound hardware. While the display is passive anyway, I tried playing DOOM on it and was surprised. Ghosting is almost not there and you can play fast-moving games just fine.

Last edited by derSammler on 2019-12-22, 18:42. Edited 2 times in total.

Reply 2 of 7, by athlon-power

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derSammler wrote:

* CPU: UMC Green CPU U5SX, 33 MHz (installed by me, had an Intel DX2/66 originally, which ran way too hot)

What the hell was a DX2/66 doing in a computer like that anyways? I'm going to assume that was a last-ditch attempt to squeeze a little more performance out of the machine before it hit its solid "EOL," by a previous user. I think the UMC CPU was a good choice to try and reduce power consumption and heat output while still retaining some performance compared to what a standard 486SX might give you.

Is the plastic over the CPU alright? I'm going to assume it is, but considering my DX2 has a huge heatsink compared to what that probably had glued onto the chip, I'd be surprised if it didn't manage to get to plastic-warping levels, or at least give you a nice "warm plastic," smell when it had been running for too long or doing intensive things.

derSammler wrote:

Too bad it has no sound hardware.

If you want to bend the rules a little, you could potentially get a parallel port "sound card," and while most of these solutions are new, there are some versions of this that are closer to the era that laptop would've been used in. That being said, if the goal of this was to put together a sensible, more budget-oriented laptop for the time, that may not fit in so well.

Where am I?

Reply 3 of 7, by derSammler

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This one came with the DX2-66. The MiTAC 4022 had no fixed hardware configuration, you could order it with various options for display, CPU, RAM, and hard disk. Lowest CPU option was an SX-25, highest one was the DX2-66.

The heatsink you see in the picture is part of the case and connects to the metal frame inside - helping dissipate heat. It's not that you burnt your fingers on the heatsink with the DX2 installed, but everything just got too hot for my taste. And I agree, it was wasted anyway. A system with only 4 megs of RAM should not use a DX2-66.

I own two parallel port sound cards: the mighty ADLIPT (OPL2LPT) and a Covox clone. Tested both. The Covox works great and I spent hours listening to MOD files with it. The ADLIPT however could not be installed, as the parallel port is recessed with almost no clearance around, so it collides with the 3d-printed case of the ADLIPT. I may get the newer OPL3LPT at some point.

Reply 4 of 7, by derSammler

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I've dumped the driver disks that came with it. Sadly, disk 3 was not original and actually empty. I guess someone wanted to rescue the damaged disk 3 onto that new floppy but failed. It was supposed to contain the PCMCIA stuff. However, disk 1 and 2 were fine, find them attached.

Reply 5 of 7, by Bondi

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Cool stuff!
I liked the feature of BIOS support for PCMCIA storage. It's very convenient.
Some of my thinkpads can boot from PCMCIA card. But you cannot access it (without drivers) unless you boot form it.

PCMCIA Sound Cards chart

Reply 6 of 7, by my03

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Sorry for bumping this very old thread.

I have (i believe) the same system as this Mitac 4022, but in my case it is called "SLT486DLB". Googling the (few) images that are available, i'm almost certain that they are the same. My machine has two PCMCIA slots (on in the front and one on the right-hand side) and it has the DX/2-66 cpu, no sound capabilities and 20MB ram (which i guess would be the maximum??).

I asked about this machine earlier when i got it and a forum user pointed me in the direction of Mitac: What is this machine (odd clone laptop - 486 dx66)

Are there any documentation available online related to the Mitac 4022 btw? I can't find any at least 🙁

Reply 7 of 7, by my03

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bumping this thread a bit. Have no issues at all with the dx2/66 (heat wise) and consider possibilities to bring it all up to 133 or slightly lower. Of course, issue is the regulator and how much it builds on top... Was there ever any very slim regulators around?