VOGONS

Common searches


What do you drive?

Topic actions

Reply 400 of 413, by bjwil1991

User metadata
Rank l33t
Rank
l33t

I do a visual inspection on a monthly basis on my car and it still needs work done. The exhaust needs patching for the time being (exhaust leak and loud noises, but the engine is quiet as a mouse) until I can buy a catalytic converter, resonator, and muffler and get them installed by a professional or my one friend.

Discord: https://discord.gg/U5dJw7x
Systems from C64 to FX-6300.

Reply 402 of 413, by sf78

User metadata
Rank Oldbie
Rank
Oldbie
wiretap wrote on 2020-01-24, 11:43:

I do all that myself.. I don't need the government to force me. And corrosion/rust is common, as we salt the roads in the winter. You can't find a car older than 1 year without rust on the undercarriage.

It's not about forcing anything, just a safety issue. And it's not like we have some two-party system that dictates our way of life either. Anyway, I had the misfortune of riding in a car where the front subframe collapsed because it had rusted from the upper portion inside out. No way of seeing it if you just inspect it form the bottom yourself. Besides, how many people actually do any kind of work on their cars these days? Most won't even do an oil change so they have no idea if anything actually works as it should. When it comes to rust I've seen 10 year old Audi's that have virtually nothing on them, my 15 year old ex-Volvo had only superficial rust on the back subframe. There are a lot of other models that do exhibit spots that tend to collect salt and mud that are more prone to rusting, but I'm glad I don't have to spend my time trying to figure it all out as there's someone who'll do it for me on year to year basis. And I'm not against tuning or removing mufflers or any other tinkering that has nothing to do with the cars road worthiness, it just baffles me that someone wouldn't want to have their car in the best possible condition regarding the safety and driving.

Reply 403 of 413, by wiretap

User metadata
Rank Oldbie
Rank
Oldbie
sf78 wrote on 2020-02-03, 10:56:
wiretap wrote on 2020-01-24, 11:43:

I do all that myself.. I don't need the government to force me. And corrosion/rust is common, as we salt the roads in the winter. You can't find a car older than 1 year without rust on the undercarriage.

It's not about forcing anything, just a safety issue. And it's not like we have some two-party system that dictates our way of life either. Anyway, I had the misfortune of riding in a car where the front subframe collapsed because it had rusted from the upper portion inside out. No way of seeing it if you just inspect it form the bottom yourself. Besides, how many people actually do any kind of work on their cars these days? Most won't even do an oil change so they have no idea if anything actually works as it should. When it comes to rust I've seen 10 year old Audi's that have virtually nothing on them, my 15 year old ex-Volvo had only superficial rust on the back subframe. There are a lot of other models that do exhibit spots that tend to collect salt and mud that are more prone to rusting, but I'm glad I don't have to spend my time trying to figure it all out as there's someone who'll do it for me on year to year basis. And I'm not against tuning or removing mufflers or any other tinkering that has nothing to do with the cars road worthiness, it just baffles me that someone wouldn't want to have their car in the best possible condition regarding the safety and driving.

Like I said, I do all my own work on my cars, inspect them thoroughly, own the OBDII readers for diagnosing issues, etc. I don't need anyone else to tell me what I need done with my vehicles. If I see there's a safety issue, I correct it. If that requires taking it into a shop because it is beyond my scope of repair skill, I'll do that. I deal with a lot more complicated problems on a daily basis at work, and far more critical to public safety (nuclear power). Spotting stress corrosion cracking, flow accelerated corrosion, intergranular stress cracking, galvanic corrosion, etc is all 2nd nature to me since I look for it daily. It isn't like I would get a better inspection at a dealer or inspection service center -- they only hire people that barely slept their way through high school and smoke pot on their lunch break.. I've seen it first hand.

If other people don't want to maintain their vehicles, that is up to them as well. I worked at a car dealer for my first year out of high school (2004), and I saw all sorts of cars come in daily that I wondered how they even got from point A to point B. We recommended repairs, but couldn't force them -- since that is the responsibility of the individual. If they want to drive a death trap that falls apart around them in a crash, good for them. If someone's broke ass vehicle causes damage to mine, that is on them as well. I can easily sue for $100k for a fender bender and win if I feel so inclined. Also, nothing is preventing anyone from taking their vehicle in for inspections. Pretty much every dealership I've been to already does this as part of a routine maintenance session, oil change, brake pad changes, etc.

Circuit Board Repair Manuals
Turbo Display Project
Dual Socket 8 Project

Reply 404 of 413, by henryVK

User metadata
Rank Member
Rank
Member

It's interesting how you argue that the average person can't and, in fact, shouldn't be trusted with basic maintenance but yet still arrive at that conclusion.

Maybe it's worth mentioning that in Germany, inspections are performed by inspection agencies and not garages. To most people, I think, the engineers and technicians at these agencies are the imbodiment of strict and exacting professionals. It's funny, because it's so antithetical to the image of "people that barely slept their way through high school and smoke pot on their lunch break" that you conjure up.

Anway, I'm always amazed at these differences and how deeply ingrained certain cultural beliefs are. Like, otherwise I wouldn't even realise how much of my behaviour is informed by the firm belief that -- to put it very plainly -- if everybody just obey the rules, we can have a relatively safe evironment for everyone to enjoy their lives in.

Reply 405 of 413, by wiretap

User metadata
Rank Oldbie
Rank
Oldbie
henryVK wrote on 2020-02-03, 14:03:

It's interesting how you argue that the average person can't and, in fact, shouldn't be trusted with basic maintenance but yet still arrive at that conclusion.

Maybe it's worth mentioning that in Germany, inspections are performed by inspection agencies and not garages. To most people, I think, the engineers and technicians at these agencies are the imbodiment of strict and exacting professionals. It's funny, because it's so antithetical to the image of "people that barely slept their way through high school and smoke pot on their lunch break" that you conjure up.

Anway, I'm always amazed at these differences and how deeply ingrained certain cultural beliefs are. Like, otherwise I wouldn't even realise how much of my behaviour is informed by the firm belief that -- to put it very plainly -- if everybody just obey the rules, we can have a relatively safe evironment for everyone to enjoy their lives in.

I never said they shouldn't get their car inspected and/or repaired. However if they don't, that's up to them. I support maintaining equipment in proper working order, however I don't support government force to do it. If someone has an impact on another person due to negligence, they should face consequences in the court of law.

Also, I didn't just conjure up that image.. I worked at a car dealer who does these type of repairs, have family members on my wife's side of the family who work at auto repair places, and have friends who work there.. The majority of the people there have nothing but a basic education and a very high amount of the employees are alcoholics or get high every day. My own boss when I worked there totalled 3 customer cars driving drunk in them.. This is pretty common, at least in the US from every place I've bought a car or had it serviced at.

Circuit Board Repair Manuals
Turbo Display Project
Dual Socket 8 Project

Reply 406 of 413, by bjwil1991

User metadata
Rank l33t
Rank
l33t

I do the same thing. Some things that require professionals, such as suspension work, I take it to the shop to get it fixed. Any other issues I come across, I do it myself. Saved a ton of money from late 2018-mid 2019 when I replaced the spark plugs, got the cooling system flushed and repaired, and some small items, like parts of the fuel system (fuel cap, EVAP canister purge valve, fuel pump pressure sensor). Hasn't stalled at all and I installed new speakers in the front of my car. 2x 60W speakers, which aren't bad at all, except the balance/fade knob keeps pulling off of my stereo. All 6 speakers work on my car (I have 2 tweeters, 2 5.25" front. and 2 6"x9" rear speakers).

Discord: https://discord.gg/U5dJw7x
Systems from C64 to FX-6300.

Reply 407 of 413, by sf78

User metadata
Rank Oldbie
Rank
Oldbie
wiretap wrote on 2020-02-03, 11:47:

Spotting stress corrosion cracking, flow accelerated corrosion, intergranular stress cracking, galvanic corrosion, etc is all 2nd nature to me since I look for it daily. It isn't like I would get a better inspection at a dealer or inspection service center -- they only hire people that barely slept their way through high school and smoke pot on their lunch break.. I've seen it first hand.

That does sound terrifying indeed. I assumed you needed a bachelors degree in engineering to even apply for the job, but I guess you have lower requirements for that.

One other benefit came to mind as the history of the car (failed inspections, modifications, mileage etc. ) can be traced as far back as 10 years so if you're buying a used car you can check out the information online (for a small fee) to see that the car is what it actually should be. I'm sure many other countries have similar records, but I'm not familiar with them.

Reply 408 of 413, by ODwilly

User metadata
Rank Oldbie
Rank
Oldbie

I have two different vehicles since the last time I posted here ages ago with my 97 Pontiac. Guess I'll need to snap some pictures and post them when I wake up in the morning 😀
1989 Toyota Camry with now 89k miles ( 73k when I bought it) w/ 2.0 4cylinder/auto. Then I just bought my first pickup. 1985 Standard cab/long bed Ford F250 4x4 with the 6.9 IDI Diesel and Auto with a whopping 116k miles on it. Lived it's entire life from new on a farm and passed on down through the family until I got my hands on her. Bought her to haul my new 24ft travel trailer/house and to haul loads of wood and such to make money with on the side.

Main pc: Asus Rampage Gene ii, X5650, 250gb Samsung Evo, RX480, 12gb Crucial DDR3 1600.

Reply 411 of 413, by ODwilly

User metadata
Rank Oldbie
Rank
Oldbie

Here they are. Both old enough to be eligible for collector plates.

Attachments

Main pc: Asus Rampage Gene ii, X5650, 250gb Samsung Evo, RX480, 12gb Crucial DDR3 1600.

Reply 413 of 413, by pentiumspeed

User metadata
Rank Member
Rank
Member

Anyone if have to, get a chrysler with 3.6L V6, late ones are pretty good and the early one had already fixed under recall is pretty good to have as well. I'm not interested in VW and Fords, too much issues. And tend to be expensive.

In 2003 thru 2011, I had Caravan Voyager 1987 with 3speed driven by 2.2L 4 cylinder topped by the carburetor (swapped for weber). Bought it for 700 CDN body was good too! Drove well for my needs even loaded down, saved lot of money doing the repairs and adjustments myself. Finally gave out from age and rust reasons and someone somehow hurt the engine at one point before acquired it and finally got too stiff in winter 2009. That starter had hard time turning fast enough to fire off effectively but will turn freely and run nicely if heated by engine's cooling heater also no problems during summer. Didn't get down to bottom of why engine is stiff if cold enough (even spring). Probably cylinder or valve stuck shut but I doubt about valves. When turned by starter, engine lurches once a revolution till finally fires off then shake badly like a steam loco with one cylinder chugging shakily, holding open throttle, about a minute later, loosens up and run like top and is fine rest of day till sat overnight if I forgot to plug heater in. I can tell the difference too much friction in one cylinder and the between and missing.

I nearly replaced 2.2L with 2.5L but couldn't:
I had trouble finding a one year only 1988 crankshaft timing belt sprocket for unique 2.5L rebuild in 2010, despite everything else is same for both 2.2/2.5 engine parts except for few parts are different and had all the parts needed. Both old crank and sprocket torsion vibrated even that bolt is properly torqued, eventually galled/eroded away due to very small diameter crank snout by design due to 5 bolts on the sprocket for pulleys and sprocket is pressed on and kept in place with a bolt and washer. Reason for choice of 1988 engine block, was tall deck meant long rod helps some with torque, 1989 and later went back to standard height for both 2.2/2.5 blocks, just the pistons, rods and cranks are different between two.

Cheers,