VOGONS


First post, by mpe

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Sorted out my original issues. Looking for help with identifying vendor and model of this motherboard:

VSr9ZgV.jpg

Intel 420EX (Aries) Socket 3.

There was only a handful of Aries board apart from Intel Ninja AFAIK and unlike most of them this one doesn't seem to be based on the reference design (namely 4 SIMM slots, PS/2 mouse onboard, >33 MHz support, etc.)

The only visible identifiers on the board are these:
150-0061-001 REV C
QP1uLgb.jpg

BIOS chip (AMI WinBios dated 07/25/1994)
0Nf9Zu8.jpg

POST screen:
41-0702-428007-072594-ARIES-P
qWt4Vx3.jpg

They seem to be using S prefixes for jumpers (S1, S2, ...). Fortunately, everything seems to be well described on the board.

Blog|NexGen 586|S4

Reply 1 of 8, by PC Hoarder Patrol

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Seems AMI aren't much help

AMI BIOS Strings.png
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and whoever it is, their only other board, 40-0203-428007-00101111-060692-AR810: ??? (Model 3/486 ) (Chipset: SIRUS AR-810 ISA) is also unidentified.

Reply 2 of 8, by perhenden

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I have one too. On mine, the S/N area appears to be blank, but with a sticker on top off it. The sticker says "Warranty void if broken o 3912". Otherwise nothing to add. My guess is that this is an industrial board.

Reply 4 of 8, by explorerdotexe

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mpe wrote on 2020-01-13, 21:25:
Sorted out my original issues. Looking for help with identifying vendor and model of this motherboard: […]
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Sorted out my original issues. Looking for help with identifying vendor and model of this motherboard:

VSr9ZgV.jpg

Intel 420EX (Aries) Socket 3.

There was only a handful of Aries board apart from Intel Ninja AFAIK and unlike most of them this one doesn't seem to be based on the reference design (namely 4 SIMM slots, PS/2 mouse onboard, >33 MHz support, etc.)

The only visible identifiers on the board are these:
150-0061-001 REV C
QP1uLgb.jpg

BIOS chip (AMI WinBios dated 07/25/1994)
0Nf9Zu8.jpg

POST screen:
41-0702-428007-072594-ARIES-P
qWt4Vx3.jpg

They seem to be using S prefixes for jumpers (S1, S2, ...). Fortunately, everything seems to be well described on the board.

Nice board! As for the ID, i tried looking to see if the string had any clue of a manufacturer (which is usually located in the part after "0702-42") but nothing came up, and the board has no indication of a manufacturer/name on it. So this still likely remains an unknown board. By the way, would you mind dumping the BIOS of this board if possible? Thanks.

Last edited by explorerdotexe on 2021-09-12, 08:51. Edited 2 times in total.

Fresh off playing Pinball on the school computers.

Reply 5 of 8, by chublord

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This is the first time I've seen this chipset. Very cool, how does it perform vs the contemporary SiS, UMC, and Opti chipsets?

IBM Valuepoint 486 DX4-100, Opti 802G, 50 MHz FSB, Voodoo1+S3 864, Quantum Fireball EX 4.0 GB, Seagate Medalist 1.6 GB, 128 MB FPM, 256k L2

Reply 6 of 8, by jakethompson1

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chublord wrote on 2021-09-11, 22:00:

This is the first time I've seen this chipset. Very cool, how does it perform vs the contemporary SiS, UMC, and Opti chipsets?

I've always understood that prior to the Triton, choosing an Intel chipset would only be for "nobody got fired for buying IBM" situations--i.e. nothing spectacular about them and maybe even worse performance than the competitive ones.

Reply 7 of 8, by explorerdotexe

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jakethompson1 wrote on 2021-09-11, 22:12:
chublord wrote on 2021-09-11, 22:00:

This is the first time I've seen this chipset. Very cool, how does it perform vs the contemporary SiS, UMC, and Opti chipsets?

I've always understood that prior to the Triton, choosing an Intel chipset would only be for "nobody got fired for buying IBM" situations--i.e. nothing spectacular about them and maybe even worse performance than the competitive ones.

Intel chipsets, although present in the 486 era, weren't actually that commonly used until around Socket 4/5.

Fresh off playing Pinball on the school computers.

Reply 8 of 8, by pentiumspeed

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Intel did some chipsets for 386SX and 386DX boards. Not counting the cache controllers (385SX, 385DX and 395DX) chipset intel also produced.

Cheers,

Great Northern aka Canada.