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First post, by twiz11

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i am not happy with how extremely monetized games are these days, I mean in 20-30 years when we look back and say hey this is classic gaming, how much of it will still exist?

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Reply 1 of 52, by Robin4

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Thats why a love the older games like XT and so one..

A game doesnt have to be look technically high-end to give you pleasure..
The older games are nicer because are a lot simpler.

Today only graphics seems to have a big role, if a game looks good..

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Reply 3 of 52, by Gmlb256

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Robin4 wrote on 2023-01-01, 03:46:
Thats why a love the older games like XT and so one.. […]
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Thats why a love the older games like XT and so one..

A game doesnt have to be look technically high-end to give you pleasure..
The older games are nicer because are a lot simpler.

Today only graphics seems to have a big role, if a game looks good..

Wolfenstein 3-D, DOOM and Quake (all of them from id Software, PC gaming was seen as a joke by many prior these three games) did look high-end back then when they were introduced to the consumers, making users to upgrade or replace their computers to get a decent experience.

Nothing new, just a perfect example of nostalgia filter.

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Reply 4 of 52, by RandomStranger

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That's why I think retro will basically end somewhere between 2012 and the the end of Windows 7 3rd party support. Past that, home computing almost completely became a service. What will be the point of building a retro PC 20 years fro now out of today's hardware with outdated version of Windows 10 for software that is unavailable because they were subscription based cloud services or require launchers of which the old version can no longer connect to the service provider and the new versions don't run on the old OS?

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Reply 5 of 52, by leileilol

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like in the subject of 2 threads ago it's set off hard by microsoft entering the console gaming industry and the benchmark of capitalism domino'd from there, but that's not to say there wasn't any shameless schemes prior to that point.

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Reply 6 of 52, by MrFlibble

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RandomStranger wrote on 2023-01-01, 09:33:

What will be the point of building a retro PC 20 years fro now out of today's hardware with outdated version of Windows 10 for software that is unavailable because they were subscription based cloud services or require launchers of which the old version can no longer connect to the service provider and the new versions don't run on the old OS?

Wouldn't it be possible to put a contemporary Linux distro on such a machine? Or has MS wired Windows into firmware so hard Linux is no longer an option?

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Reply 7 of 52, by RandomStranger

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MrFlibble wrote on 2023-01-01, 13:18:
RandomStranger wrote on 2023-01-01, 09:33:

What will be the point of building a retro PC 20 years fro now out of today's hardware with outdated version of Windows 10 for software that is unavailable because they were subscription based cloud services or require launchers of which the old version can no longer connect to the service provider and the new versions don't run on the old OS?

Wouldn't it be possible to put a contemporary Linux distro on such a machine? Or has MS wired Windows into firmware so hard Linux is no longer an option?

You could, but isn't doing retro is about nostalgia and using the hardware of back than the way you did back then? Running Linux would definitely make them more viable, but less nostalgic for most.

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Reply 8 of 52, by DosFreak

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twiz11 wrote on 2023-01-01, 02:32:

i am not happy with how extremely monetized games are these days, I mean in 20-30 years when we look back and say hey this is classic gaming, how much of it will still exist?

That depends on how much effort you put into it.
I've made backup copies of all "my" games with the information and programs required to run them since 1990, for those that don't (pretty much everyone) then they have to rely on a game company or service or a so called "abandonware" site.
If you continue to play online games that can't be run without company provided servers then that's on you. Don't do that or if you do then don't expect any longevity.
As far as "classic gaming" this is will be defined by whatever influencer or game company tells you what it is and everyone will eat it up.
You can't change the world unless you have the power to do so, stay away from what you don't like, use your brain and put the work in to save what you do and you'll be fine.

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Reply 9 of 52, by Joseph_Joestar

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twiz11 wrote on 2023-01-01, 02:32:

i am not happy with how extremely monetized games are these days, I mean in 20-30 years when we look back and say hey this is classic gaming, how much of it will still exist?

Nowadays, I buy most of my games on GOG since they are DRM-free and come with offline installers which you can store on an external hard drive or backup using optical media.

On the flip side, not every game that I want is available on GOG.

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Reply 10 of 52, by konc

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leileilol wrote on 2023-01-01, 03:53:

*cough*scenery disks*cough*shareware filler schemes*cough*double dragon 3*cough*telegaming*cough*

What's the story with double dragon 3?

Edit: Oh you probably mean the ability to purchase power-ups with coins in the arcade version

Last edited by konc on 2023-01-01, 16:17. Edited 1 time in total.

Reply 11 of 52, by lolo799

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leileilol wrote on 2023-01-01, 03:53:

*cough*scenery disks*cough*shareware filler schemes*cough*double dragon 3*cough*telegaming*cough*

Scenery disks add playable content atleast, speech packs on the other hand...

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Reply 12 of 52, by zyzzle

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They sure are, yes, they're ridiculously monetized. It's "cooked" into the games now. Everything is a paywall of some sort, the very object of the game is often to pay your way through, as the game can't be completed without a severe additional drain on the wallet.

Give me 40-year old, 30 year-old-games any time. You wasted quarters at the Arcade, but when or if you got good enough, a single quarter could last you for an evening of entertainment. Now, your $60 or $70 provides pretty graphics and mindnumbingly stupid visual effects, but very little actual entertainment. It's all visual overload now. Games cost more than movies, with budgets in the tens-to-hundreds of millions of dollars. It is patently absurd to see how far we've devolved in 40 years. Those hundreds of millions of $$$ have to be made up, and you've got paywalls, and you don't actually "own" anything any more, just the right to pay to play it.

Reply 13 of 52, by RandomStranger

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zyzzle wrote on 2023-01-04, 05:30:

Now, your $60 or $70 provides pretty graphics and mindnumbingly stupid visual effects, but very little actual entertainment. It's all visual overload now.

And why even raise the price from 60 to 70? Sure, games are more expensive today than they were 20 years ago, but distribution is a lot cheaper and the market is over 10× bigger and after all these there are post-launch monetization in basically everything.

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Reply 14 of 52, by Unknown_K

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I don't know, some of the games I have for Amiga for example came with receipts and they were not cheap (adjusted for inflation).

I miss games you could play alone without needing internet or other players. Diablo 2 was the last version I liked.

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Reply 15 of 52, by Ensign Nemo

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Unknown_K wrote on 2023-01-04, 06:46:

I don't know, some of the games I have for Amiga for example came with receipts and they were not cheap (adjusted for inflation).

I miss games you could play alone without needing internet or other players. Diablo 2 was the last version I liked.

I assume that a lot of us just traded shareware and pirated games back in the 90s, so many of us probably have an inaccurate idea of the costs back then. I was just a kid and only bought a few shareware games and one single retail game myself. On a side note, I don't think that it's really the cost that bugs people. I don't mind giving $60 to a small team who are passionate about their game, rather than a giant company that tries to squeeze every penny out of you. A lot of well known games from the 80s and 90s only sold in the tens of thousands, so it feels better throwing a few bucks to those developers.

On your second point, the indie games have you covered. For example, I have sunk more hours in Terraria than any other game, almost entirely during singleplayer. I also only paid like $2.50 for it!

Reply 16 of 52, by RandomStranger

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Ensign Nemo wrote on 2023-01-04, 08:08:
Unknown_K wrote on 2023-01-04, 06:46:

I don't know, some of the games I have for Amiga for example came with receipts and they were not cheap (adjusted for inflation).

I miss games you could play alone without needing internet or other players. Diablo 2 was the last version I liked.

I assume that a lot of us just traded shareware and pirated games back in the 90s, so many of us probably have an inaccurate idea of the costs back then. I was just a kid and only bought a few shareware games and one single retail game myself.

That's sort of truer where I live than for more western countries. The 90's in a former eastern bloc country meant 3 things when it came to video games.

Home computers just weren't a thing and consoles were rare and mostly bootleg versions of Nintendo until the PS2 era, gaming culture was far behind and not taken seriously at all.

Almost everything was pirated/bootleg, people during communism just got used to not buying anything and bootlegging was a serious business. An older coworker of mine bought his first apartment off of copying CDs and MCs. There were official bootlegging shops in town. Well as official as they can be.

Inflation made legal games even more inaccessible. Even at around 2000 when things have mostly settled down already, games were proportionally 2 to 3 times as expensive as they are today.

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Reply 17 of 52, by newtmonkey

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There's a great video on Youtube summarizing what is so awful about the monetization practices being put into use today:

https://youtu.be/g16heGLKlTA

What is being done today is on a whole different level from a straightforward commercial transaction like buying an expansion pack (or even a speech pack), and is even very different from the arcade game model in the 70s through 90s. The major difference is that, previously, you generally knew what you were getting. In arcades, you were spending a quarter to play until you got a game over; if you could get skilled enough, you could play for a long time on that quarter. At home, you were spending XX dollars to get an expansion to a game you enjoyed or additional content... I'd actually put most DLC in this same category; it's clear what you are getting, and whether that's worth it to you depends on what you want.

The stuff being done today is predatory. Things like using multiple types of in-game currency as a "layer" between real currency and content, and then selling in-game currency in "packs" that are just slightly off from the costs of things (for example, all content is sold in multiples of 100 units of currency, but you can only buy packs of 95 units of currency), or tying paid content to a "loyalty" score that requires you to play X days in a row in order to retain the content you paid for.

It's easy to say, well, just don't play these heavily monetized free-to-play games... but this kind of predatory monetization works extremely well and is basically "free money" for publishers, and if people don't take a stand now, it's going to find its way into games of all types.

Reply 18 of 52, by ZellSF

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twiz11 wrote on 2023-01-01, 02:32:

i am not happy with how extremely monetized games are these days, I mean in 20-30 years when we look back and say hey this is classic gaming, how much of it will still exist?

Heavily monetized games are a minority. Only the biggest AAA titles really bother to any significant extent. So I don't think that all that much will be gone based on that.

Reply 19 of 52, by RandomStranger

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ZellSF wrote on 2023-01-04, 21:31:
twiz11 wrote on 2023-01-01, 02:32:

i am not happy with how extremely monetized games are these days, I mean in 20-30 years when we look back and say hey this is classic gaming, how much of it will still exist?

Heavily monetized games are a minority. Only the biggest AAA titles really bother to any significant extent. So I don't think that all that much will be gone based on that.

No. It's that only the biggest AAA titles induce an uproar. Anti-consumer post launch monetization affect every level of gaming, people just don't care as much if the game is cheap or free.

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