VOGONS


Dual 386 Motherboard??????

Topic actions

First post, by 2Mourty

User metadata
Rank Member
Rank
Member

Browsing ebay and saw this:

http://cgi.ebay.com/Vintage-Intel-PAT38PI-1-1 … #ht_3940wt_1161

Is there really such a thing as a dual 386 motherboard. If there is why? Was there an OS that could actually take advantage of that back in the day?

Maybe the other socket is for a 387 fpu.....

Reply 4 of 44, by GL1zdA

User metadata
Rank Oldbie
Rank
Oldbie

Dual 386 computer existed in the form of the Compaq SystemPro, but it was only supported by Windows NT 3.1. (It was a custom, asymetric design). As you can see in the picture, there were actually processor daughterboards, not just sockets on the mainboard. You can find a nice file-server comparison including 386 SystemPro in InfoWorld (browse to page 55, there's some problem with googles page numeration). I can't think of any other computer using more than one 386 CPU. There were more dual (and more) 486 based servers, but these were mostly custom designs. (If you browse the pictures on1 and 2 on stason, you probably find some dual 486 motherboards). Dual processor workstation motherboards become more popular with the Pentium and the 430NX chipset (motherboards like Tyan S1462 @stason, manual).

getquake.gif | InfoWorld/PC Magazine Indices

Reply 9 of 44, by 2Mourty

User metadata
Rank Member
Rank
Member

This site is such an amazing virtual fount of knowledge! Now for some reason, and I don't know why, a dual 486 sounds kind of cool!

Reply 10 of 44, by WolverineDK

User metadata
Rank Oldbie
Rank
Oldbie
2Mourty wrote:

This site is such an amazing virtual fount of knowledge! Now for some reason, and I don't know why, a dual 486 sounds kind of cool!

Yeah if we obey the rules we can see the gems that are on this forum. And yes I must say, that this forum is really a fountain of knowledge. And me ? I am just trying to hold on and learn as much as possible from the other guys.
And I speak highly in regards to this forum because of its living information database of knowledge between the members.

Reply 11 of 44, by Svenne

User metadata
Rank Member
Rank
Member
2Mourty wrote:

This site is such an amazing virtual fount of knowledge! Now for some reason, and I don't know why, a dual 486 sounds kind of cool!

😁
However, that would probably require Windows NT 4.0, since Windows 9x cannot handle more than one CPU.

Intel C2D 2.8 GHz @ 3.0 GHz | ASUS P5KPL | ASUS GTS250 1 GB | 4GB DDR2-800 | 500 GB SATA | Win 7 Pro/Ubuntu 9.10

Reply 12 of 44, by Amigaz

User metadata
Rank Oldbie
Rank
Oldbie
Svenne wrote:
2Mourty wrote:

This site is such an amazing virtual fount of knowledge! Now for some reason, and I don't know why, a dual 486 sounds kind of cool!

😁
However, that would probably require Windows NT 4.0, since Windows 9x cannot handle more than one CPU.

Or why not Windows NT3.1? NT4.0 is too "new" 😁

My retro computer stuff: https://lychee.jjserver.net/#16136303902327

Reply 13 of 44, by GL1zdA

User metadata
Rank Oldbie
Rank
Oldbie
Amigaz wrote:

Or why not Windows NT3.1? NT4.0 is too "new" 😁

Out of the box NT 3.1 supports only custom multiprocessor servers like the SystemPro, Wyse or AST. You won't be able to run it on an MPS compliant motherboard unless you get the MP specification v1.1 HAL installation kit.

EDIT: linked to the wrong topic 😜.

Last edited by GL1zdA on 2010-01-19, 21:56. Edited 1 time in total.

getquake.gif | InfoWorld/PC Magazine Indices

Reply 14 of 44, by Amigaz

User metadata
Rank Oldbie
Rank
Oldbie
GL1zdA wrote:
Amigaz wrote:

Or why not Windows NT3.1? NT4.0 is too "new" 😁

Out of the box NT 3.1 supports only custom multiprocessor servers like the SystemPro, Wyse or AST. You won't be able to run it on an MPS compliant motherboard unless you get the MP specification v1.1 HAL installation kit.

Really? I'm running Win NT3.1 on my 486 Eisa system

My retro computer stuff: https://lychee.jjserver.net/#16136303902327

Reply 15 of 44, by GL1zdA

User metadata
Rank Oldbie
Rank
Oldbie
Amigaz wrote:
GL1zdA wrote:
Amigaz wrote:

Or why not Windows NT3.1? NT4.0 is too "new" 😁

Out of the box NT 3.1 supports only custom multiprocessor servers like the SystemPro, Wyse or AST. You won't be able to run it on an MPS compliant motherboard unless you get the MP specification v1.1 HAL installation kit.

Really? I'm running Win NT3.1 on my 486 Eisa system

But it is uniprocessor, isn't it? There's a standard HAL for uniprocessor systems, but not for multiprocessor ones (except for the Intel MPS kit).

EDIT: same as above. linked to the wrong topic.

Last edited by GL1zdA on 2010-01-19, 21:56. Edited 1 time in total.

getquake.gif | InfoWorld/PC Magazine Indices

Reply 16 of 44, by Amigaz

User metadata
Rank Oldbie
Rank
Oldbie
GL1zdA wrote:
Amigaz wrote:
GL1zdA wrote:

Out of the box NT 3.1 supports only custom multiprocessor servers like the SystemPro, Wyse or AST. You won't be able to run it on an MPS compliant motherboard unless you get the MP specification v1.1 HAL installation kit.

Really? I'm running Win NT3.1 on my 486 Eisa system

But it is uniprocessor, isn't it? There's a standard HAL for uniprocessor systems, but not for multiprocessor ones (except for the Intel MPS kit).

You're right, I didn't read you post good enough 😜

My retro computer stuff: https://lychee.jjserver.net/#16136303902327

Reply 18 of 44, by LightningCrash

User metadata
Rank Newbie
Rank
Newbie

Hate to bump an old thread, but the 387 coprocessors i saw were 68-pin. That second socket in the listing looks like it's 132/133-pin

ETA: on further inspection and counting it looks like the socket is 121 pins

Reply 19 of 44, by Tetrium

User metadata
Rank l33t++
Rank
l33t++
LightningCrash wrote:

Hate to bump an old thread, but the 387 coprocessors i saw were 68-pin. That second socket in the listing looks like it's 132/133-pin

ETA: on further inspection and counting it looks like the socket is 121 pins

Looks like a socket for the weitek

http://www.cpu-collection.de/?l0=co&l1=Weitek&l2=386%20FPU